Moore's law

Moore’s Lawcomputational powermass-producedincreasing performance18–24 month generational update in computer systems technologyapproximate doubling of computer power every 2 yearschip density increasescomputational capacitycomputer processing powerCramming more components onto integrated circuits
Moore's law is the observation that the number of transistors in a dense integrated circuit doubles about every two years.wikipedia
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Gordon Moore

Gordon E. MooreGordonGordon and Betty Moore
The observation is named after Gordon Moore, the co-founder of Fairchild Semiconductor and CEO of Intel, whose 1965 paper described a doubling every year in the number of components per integrated circuit, and projected this rate of growth would continue for at least another decade.
He is also the author of Moore's law.

Intel

Intel CorporationIntel Corp.Intel Inside
The observation is named after Gordon Moore, the co-founder of Fairchild Semiconductor and CEO of Intel, whose 1965 paper described a doubling every year in the number of components per integrated circuit, and projected this rate of growth would continue for at least another decade.
Intel Corporation was founded on July 18, 1968, by semiconductor pioneers Robert Noyce and Gordon Moore (of Moore's law), and is associated with the executive leadership and vision of Andrew Grove.

Microprocessor

microprocessorsprocessorprocessors
Advancements in digital electronics are strongly linked to Moore's law: quality-adjusted microprocessor prices, memory capacity (RAM and flash), sensors, and even the number and size of pixels in digital cameras.
MOS chips further increased in complexity at a rate predicted by Moore's law, leading to large-scale integration (LSI) with hundreds of transistors on a single MOS chip by the late 1960s.

Transistor count

transistor densitytransistorsdoubling of transistors
Moore's law is the observation that the number of transistors in a dense integrated circuit doubles about every two years.
The rate at which MOS transistor counts have increased generally follows Moore's law, which observed that the transistor count doubles approximately every two years.

Silicon

Sisilicon revolutionsilicium
Moore's law is closely related to MOSFET scaling, also known as Dennard scaling, as the rapid scaling and miniaturization of silicon MOSFETs (metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors, or MOS transistors) is the key driving force behind Moore's law.
It was the first truly compact transistor that could be miniaturised and mass-produced for a wide range of uses, The beginning of the silicon revolution has been dated to 1960, when Mohamed M. Atalla and Dawon Kahng first demonstrated their invention of the MOSFET.

International Electron Devices Meeting

IEEE International Electron Devices MeetingIEDM
The IEDM is where "Moore’s Law" got its name, as Gordon Moore first published his predictions in an article in Electronics Magazine in 1965.

Economic growth

growthGDP growthgrowth rate
Moore's law describes a driving force of technological and social change, productivity, and economic growth.
US productivity growth spiked towards the end of the century in 1996–2004, due to an acceleration in the rate of technological innovation known as Moore's law.

MOSFET

metal-oxide-semiconductorMOSMOS integrated circuit
Moore's law is closely related to MOSFET scaling, also known as Dennard scaling, as the rapid scaling and miniaturization of silicon MOSFETs (metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors, or MOS transistors) is the key driving force behind Moore's law. In 1974, Robert H. Dennard at IBM recognized the rapid MOSFET scaling technology and formulated what became known as Dennard scaling.
MOSFETs are also capable of high scalability (Moore's law and Dennard scaling), with increasing miniaturisation, and can be easily scaled down to smaller dimensions.

Exponential growth

exponentiallyexponentialgrow exponentially
The observation is named after Gordon Moore, the co-founder of Fairchild Semiconductor and CEO of Intel, whose 1965 paper described a doubling every year in the number of components per integrated circuit, and projected this rate of growth would continue for at least another decade.

22 nanometer

22 nm20 nm22
Intel stated in 2015 that their pace of advancement has slowed, starting at the 22 nm feature width around 2012, and continuing at 14 nm.
This is an indication that CMOS scaling in this area has reached a wall at this point, possibly disturbing Moore's law.

Integrated circuit

integrated circuitsmicrochipchip
Moore's law is the observation that the number of transistors in a dense integrated circuit doubles about every two years.
These advances, roughly following Moore's law, make computer chips of today possess millions of times the capacity and thousands of times the speed of the computer chips of the early 1970s.

Dennard scaling

constant field scaling
Moore's law is closely related to MOSFET scaling, also known as Dennard scaling, as the rapid scaling and miniaturization of silicon MOSFETs (metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors, or MOS transistors) is the key driving force behind Moore's law. In 1974, Robert H. Dennard at IBM recognized the rapid MOSFET scaling technology and formulated what became known as Dennard scaling.
Moore's law says that the number of transistors doubles about every two years.

International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors

ITRSITRS roadmapNational Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors
For example, the 2010 update to the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors predicted that growth would slow around 2013, and in 2015, Gordon Moore foresaw that the rate of progress would reach saturation: "I see Moore's law dying here in the next decade or so."
With the generally acknowledged sunsetting of Moore's law and, ITRS issuing in 2016 its final roadmap, a new initiative for a more generalized roadmapping was started through the IEEE's Rebooting Computing initiative, named the International Roadmap for Devices and Systems (IRDS).

Carver Mead

Carver A. Mead
Shortly after 1975, Caltech professor Carver Mead popularized the term "Moore's law".
Mead is credited by Gordon Moore with coining the term Moore's law, to denote the prediction Moore made in 1965 about the growth rate of the component count, "a component being a transistor, resistor, diode or capacitor," fitting on a single integrated circuit.

5 nanometer

5 nm3.5 nmaverage half-pitch of a memory cell expected to be manufactured circa 2019-2020
In the late 2010s, only two semiconductor manufacturers have been able to produce semiconductor nodes that keep pace with Moore's law, TSMC and Samsung Electronics, with 10 nm, 7 nm and 5 nm nodes in production (and plans for 3 nm nodes), whereas the pace has slowed down for Intel and other semiconductor manufacturers.
The 5 nm node was once assumed by some experts to be the end of Moore's law.

Flash memory

flashNANDFlash ROM
Advancements in digital electronics are strongly linked to Moore's law: quality-adjusted microprocessor prices, memory capacity (RAM and flash), sensors, and even the number and size of pixels in digital cameras.
The capacity of flash chips generally follows Moore's Law because they are manufactured with many of the same integrated circuits techniques and equipment.

Robert H. Dennard

Robert DennardDennard, Robert H.
In 1974, Robert H. Dennard at IBM recognized the rapid MOSFET scaling technology and formulated what became known as Dennard scaling.
This property underlies the achievement of Moore's Law and the evolution of microelectronics over the last few decades.

Multigate device

GAAFETgate-all-arounddouble-gate
Compared to FinFETs, which have gate dielectric on three sides of the channel, gate-all-around MOSFET (GAAFET) structure has even better gate control.
Multi-gate transistors are one of the several strategies being developed by MOS semiconductor manufacturers to create ever-smaller microprocessors and memory cells, colloquially referred to as extending Moore's law.

Very Large Scale Integration

VLSIvery-large-scale integrationvery large-scale integration
This made it possible to build high-density IC chips, enabling what would later be known as Moore's law.
Structured VLSI design had been popular in the early 1980s, but lost its popularity later because of the advent of placement and routing tools wasting a lot of area by routing, which is tolerated because of the progress of Moore's Law.

Moore's second law

Rock's law
This had led to the formulation of Moore's second law, also called Rock's law, which is that the capital cost of a semiconductor fab also increases exponentially over time.
Rock's law can be seen as the economic flip side to Moores (first) law – that the number of transistors in a dense integrated circuit doubles every two years.

Embedded system

embedded systemsembeddedembedded device
MOS chips further increased in complexity at a rate predicted by Moore's law, leading to large-scale integration (LSI) with hundreds of transistors on a single MOS chip by the late 1960s.

Electronics (magazine)

ElectronicsElectronics MagazineElectronics'' (magazine)
For the thirty-fifth anniversary issue of Electronics magazine, which was published on April 19, 1965, Gordon Moore, who was working as the director of research and development at Fairchild Semiconductor at the time, was asked to predict what was going to happen in the semiconductor components industry over the next ten years.
The magazine is best known for publishing the April 19, 1965 article by Intel co-founder Gordon Moore, in which he outlined what came to be known as Moore's Law.

Transistor

transistorstransistorizedsilicon transistor
Moore's law is the observation that the number of transistors in a dense integrated circuit doubles about every two years.

Nanoelectronics

nanoelectronicBio-nano generatordeep sub-micron
One of the key challenges of engineering future nanoscale transistors is the design of gates.
In 1965 Gordon Moore observed that silicon transistors were undergoing a continual process of scaling downward, an observation which was later codified as Moore's law.