Moravia

Habsburg MoraviaMoravianMoravaMährenDuchy of Moraviaeastern partMaehrenMoravia, Czech RepublicMoravian basinMoravian lands
Moravia (, also, ; Morava ; Mähren ; Morawy ; Moravia) is a historical region in the Czech Republic (forming its eastern part) and one of the historical Czech lands, together with Bohemia and Czech Silesia.wikipedia
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Bohemia

BohemianBöhmenAustrian Bohemia
Moravia (, also, ; Morava ; Mähren ; Morawy ; Moravia) is a historical region in the Czech Republic (forming its eastern part) and one of the historical Czech lands, together with Bohemia and Czech Silesia. Moravia borders Bohemia in the west, Lower Austria in the south(west), Slovakia in the southeast, Poland very shortly in the north, and Czech Silesia in the northeast.
In a broader meaning, Bohemia sometimes refers to the entire Czech territory, including Moravia and Czech Silesia, especially in a historical context, such as the Lands of the Bohemian Crown ruled by Bohemian kings.

Czech lands

Czechhistorical landRegion
Moravia (, also, ; Morava ; Mähren ; Morawy ; Moravia) is a historical region in the Czech Republic (forming its eastern part) and one of the historical Czech lands, together with Bohemia and Czech Silesia.
The Czech lands or the Bohemian lands (České země) are the three historical regions of Bohemia, Moravia, and Czech Silesia.

Margraviate of Moravia

MoraviaMargrave of MoraviaMoravian
The medieval and early modern Margraviate of Moravia was a crown land of the Lands of the Bohemian Crown (from 1348 to 1918), an imperial state of the Holy Roman Empire (1004 to 1806), later a crown land of the Austrian Empire (1804 to 1867) and briefly also one of 17 former crown lands of the Cisleithanian part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire from 1867 to 1918.
It comprised the region called Moravia within the modern Czech Republic.

Czech Silesia

SilesiaSilesianMoravian Silesia
Moravia (, also, ; Morava ; Mähren ; Morawy ; Moravia) is a historical region in the Czech Republic (forming its eastern part) and one of the historical Czech lands, together with Bohemia and Czech Silesia. During the early 20th century, Moravia was one of the five lands of Czechoslovakia from 1918 to 1928; it was then merged with Czech Silesia, and eventually dissolved by abolition of the land system in 1949. Moravia borders Bohemia in the west, Lower Austria in the south(west), Slovakia in the southeast, Poland very shortly in the north, and Czech Silesia in the northeast.
While not today an administrative entity in itself, Czech Silesia is, together with Bohemia and Moravia, one of the three historical Czech lands.

Olomouc

OlmützOlmutzOlomouc, Czech Republic
Before being sacked by the Swedish army during the Thirty Years' War, Olomouc was another capital.
Olomouc (,, ; locally Holomóc or Olomóc; Olmütz; Ołomuniec ; Alamóc; Olomucium or Iuliomontium) is a city in Moravia, in the east of the Czech Republic.

List of rivers of the Czech Republic

fourth longest riverprincipalRivers of the Czech Republic
The region and former margraviate of Moravia, Morava in Czech, is named after its [[List of rivers of the Czech Republic#Rivers flowing to the Black Sea (Danube basin)|principal]] river Morava.
As the Main European Watershed passes through the Czech Republic, there are three directions and principal areas of drainage (very roughly overlapping with historical territories of Bohemia, Moravia and Silesia):

First Czechoslovak Republic

CzechoslovakiaCzechoslovak RepublicCzechoslovak
During the early 20th century, Moravia was one of the five lands of Czechoslovakia from 1918 to 1928; it was then merged with Czech Silesia, and eventually dissolved by abolition of the land system in 1949.
It was composed of the territories of Austria-Hungary, having different system of administration of the former respective Austrian (Bohemia, Moravia, a small part of Silesia) and Hungarian territories (mostly Upper Hungary and Carpathian Ruthenia).

Morava (river)

MoravaMorava RiverMarch
The region and former margraviate of Moravia, Morava in Czech, is named after its [[List of rivers of the Czech Republic#Rivers flowing to the Black Sea (Danube basin)|principal]] river Morava. The land takes its name from the Morava river, which rises in the northern tip of the region and flows southward to the opposite end, being its major stream.
It is the main river of Moravia, which derives its name from it.

Moravians

MoravianMoravians (ethnic group)
The people are historically named Moravians, a subgroup of Czechs (as understood by Czechs).
Moravians (Czech: Moravané or colloquially Moraváci, outdated Moravci) are a West Slavic ethnographic group from the Moravia region of the Czech Republic, who speak the Moravian dialects of the Czech language or Common Czech or a mixed form of both.

Czechs

CzechCzech peopleBohemian
The people are historically named Moravians, a subgroup of Czechs (as understood by Czechs).
Slavs settled in Bohemia, Moravia and Austria sometime during the 6th or 7th centuries, and "assimilated the remaining Celtic and Germanic populations".

Lands of the Bohemian Crown

Bohemian CrownCrown of BohemiaBohemia
The medieval and early modern Margraviate of Moravia was a crown land of the Lands of the Bohemian Crown (from 1348 to 1918), an imperial state of the Holy Roman Empire (1004 to 1806), later a crown land of the Austrian Empire (1804 to 1867) and briefly also one of 17 former crown lands of the Cisleithanian part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire from 1867 to 1918.
In the 10th and 11th century the Duchy of Bohemia, together with Moravia (the Margraviate of Moravia from 1182 on), and Kłodzko Land were consolidated under the ruling Přemyslid dynasty.

Slavonice

Its natural boundary is formed by the Sudetes mountains in the north, the Carpathians in the east and the Bohemian-Moravian Highlands in the west (the border runs from Králický Sněžník in the north, over Suchý vrch, across Upper Svratka Highlands and Javořice Highlands to tripoint nearby Slavonice in the south).
Slavonice (Zlabings) is a town situated in the southwest of Moravia near the border with South Bohemia, Czech Republic, about a kilometre from the Austrian border, with about 2,700 inhabitants.

Suchý vrch

Its natural boundary is formed by the Sudetes mountains in the north, the Carpathians in the east and the Bohemian-Moravian Highlands in the west (the border runs from Králický Sněžník in the north, over Suchý vrch, across Upper Svratka Highlands and Javořice Highlands to tripoint nearby Slavonice in the south).
Suchý vrch Dürrer Berg; Suchy szczyt (Dry hill); (995 metres) is the highest (double-peaked) mountain of Bukovohorská mountains, eastern part of Orlické Mountains, Moravia and Bohemia Czech Republic.

Sudetes

Sudeten MountainsSudetenSudetes Mountains
Its natural boundary is formed by the Sudetes mountains in the north, the Carpathians in the east and the Bohemian-Moravian Highlands in the west (the border runs from Králický Sněžník in the north, over Suchý vrch, across Upper Svratka Highlands and Javořice Highlands to tripoint nearby Slavonice in the south).
Mount Praděd (1,491 m/4,893 ft) in the Hrubý Jeseník Mountains is the highest mountain of Moravia.

Olomouc Region

OlomoucOlomoucký krajOlomoucký Region, Czech Republic
Today Moravia including the South Moravian Region, the Zlín Region, vast majority of the Olomouc Region, southeastern half of the Vysočina Region and parts of the Moravian-Silesian, Pardubice and South Bohemian regions.
Olomouc Region (Olomoucký kraj, Kraj ołomuniecki) is an administrative unit (kraj) of the Czech Republic, located in the north-western and central part of its historical region of Moravia (Morava) and in a small part of the historical region of Czech Silesia (České Slezsko).

Zlín Region

ZlínZlinZlínský kraj
Today Moravia including the South Moravian Region, the Zlín Region, vast majority of the Olomouc Region, southeastern half of the Vysočina Region and parts of the Moravian-Silesian, Pardubice and South Bohemian regions.
Zlín Region (Zlínský kraj) is an administrative unit (kraj) of the Czech Republic, located in the south-eastern part of the historical region of Moravia.

Moravian-Silesian Region

Moravian-SilesianMoravia-SilesiaMoravian–Silesian Region
Today Moravia including the South Moravian Region, the Zlín Region, vast majority of the Olomouc Region, southeastern half of the Vysočina Region and parts of the Moravian-Silesian, Pardubice and South Bohemian regions.
The region is located in the north-eastern part of its historical region of Moravia and in most of the Czech part of the historical region of Silesia.

Javořice Highlands (Moravia)

Javořice Highlands
Its natural boundary is formed by the Sudetes mountains in the north, the Carpathians in the east and the Bohemian-Moravian Highlands in the west (the border runs from Králický Sněžník in the north, over Suchý vrch, across Upper Svratka Highlands and Javořice Highlands to tripoint nearby Slavonice in the south).
The Javořice Highlands (Czech: Javořická vrchovina, German: Jaborschützer Bergeland ) is a mountain range in Moravia, Czech Republic.

Upper Svratka Highlands

Its natural boundary is formed by the Sudetes mountains in the north, the Carpathians in the east and the Bohemian-Moravian Highlands in the west (the border runs from Králický Sněžník in the north, over Suchý vrch, across Upper Svratka Highlands and Javořice Highlands to tripoint nearby Slavonice in the south).
The Upper Svratka Highlands (Czech: Hornosvratecká vrchovina, German: Hohe Schwarza Bergeland, Polish: Wyżyna Górnoswratecka) is a mountain range in Moravia, Czech Republic.

Pardubice Region

PardubicePardubický krajEast Bohemian
Today Moravia including the South Moravian Region, the Zlín Region, vast majority of the Olomouc Region, southeastern half of the Vysočina Region and parts of the Moravian-Silesian, Pardubice and South Bohemian regions.
Pardubice Region (Pardubický kraj; Kraj pardubicki) is an administrative unit (kraj) of the Czech Republic, located mainly in the eastern part of its historical region of Bohemia, with a small part in northwestern Moravia.

Austrian Silesia

SilesiaDuchy of Upper and Lower SilesiaUpper and Lower Silesia
Between 1782–1850, Moravia (also thus known as Moravia-Silesia) also included a small portion of the former province of Silesia – the Austrian Silesia (when Frederick the Great annexed most of ancient Silesia (the land of upper and middle Oder river) to Prussia, Silesia's southernmost part remained with the Habsburgs).
Austrian Silesia consisted of two territories, separated by the Moravian land strip of Moravská Ostrava between the Ostravice and Oder rivers.

South Bohemian Region

South BohemiaSouth BohemianSouthern Bohemia
Today Moravia including the South Moravian Region, the Zlín Region, vast majority of the Olomouc Region, southeastern half of the Vysočina Region and parts of the Moravian-Silesian, Pardubice and South Bohemian regions.
South Bohemia (Jihočeský kraj, Südböhmische Region) is an administrative unit (kraj) of the Czech Republic, located mostly in the southern part of its historical land of Bohemia, with a small part in southwestern Moravia.

Vysočina Region

VysočinaVysocinaHighland (Vysočina) Region
Today Moravia including the South Moravian Region, the Zlín Region, vast majority of the Olomouc Region, southeastern half of the Vysočina Region and parts of the Moravian-Silesian, Pardubice and South Bohemian regions.
The Vysočina Region (Kraj Vysočina "Highlands Region", Region Hochland), is an administrative unit (kraj) of the Czech Republic, located partly in the south-eastern part of the historical region of Bohemia and partly in the south-west of the historical region of Moravia.

Thirty Years' War

Thirty Years WarThirty Years’ War30 Years War
Before being sacked by the Swedish army during the Thirty Years' War, Olomouc was another capital.
Soon afterward, the Bohemian conflict spread through all of the Bohemian Crown, including Bohemia, Silesia, Upper and Lower Lusatia, and Moravia.

Slovakia

SlovakSVKSlovak Republic
Moravia borders Bohemia in the west, Lower Austria in the south(west), Slovakia in the southeast, Poland very shortly in the north, and Czech Silesia in the northeast.
Together with neighbouring Moravia, the principality formed the core of the Great Moravian Empire from 833.