A report on Moravia and Old Church Slavonic

Example of the Cyrillic alphabet: excerpt from the manuscript "Bdinski Zbornik" written in Old Slavonic, 1360
Rolling hills of the Králický Sněžník massif, Horní Morava, near the border with Bohemia
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A page from the Gospel of Miroslav, Serbian medieval manuscript, a 12th-century Byzantine-Slavonic book, National Library of Serbia.
Šance Dam on the Ostravice River in the Moravian-Silesian Beskids; the river forms the border with Silesia.
The Introduction of the Slavonic Liturgy in Great Moravia (1912), by Alphonse Mucha, The Slav Epic
Steppe landscape near Mohelno
"Simeon I of Bulgaria, the Morning Star of Slavonic Literature". (1923), by Alphonse Mucha, The Slav Epic
Venus of Vestonice, the oldest surviving ceramic figurine in the world
Pálava mountains with Věstonice Reservoir, area of palaeolithic settlement
Territory of Great Moravia in the 9th century: area ruled by Rastislav (846–870) map marks the greatest territorial extent during the reign of Svatopluk I (871–894), violet core is origin of Moravia.
Saint Wenceslas Cathedral in Olomouc, seat of bishops of Olomouc since the 10th century and the current seat of the Archbishopric of Olomouc, the Metropolitan archdiocese of Moravia
Moravian nationality, as declared by people in the 1991 census
Moravian Slovak costumes (worn by men and women) during the Jízda králů ("Ride of the Kings") Festival held annually in the village of Vlčnov (southeastern Moravia)
Old ethnic division of Moravians according to an encyclopaedia of 1878
Lednice Castle
Punkevní Cave in the Moravian Karst
Bohemia and Moravia in the 12th century
Church of St. Thomas in Brno, mausoleum of Moravian branch House of Luxembourg, rulers of Moravia; and the old governor's palace, a former Augustinian abbey
12th century Romanesque St. Procopius Basilica in Třebíč
The Moravian banner of arms, which first appeared in the medieval era<ref>{{cite conference|first1 = Zbyšek|last1 = Svoboda|first2 = Pavel|last2 = Fojtík|first3 = Petr|last3 = Exner|first4 = Jaroslav|last4 = Martykán|title = Odborné vexilologické stanovisko k moravské vlajce|book-title = Vexilologie. Zpravodaj České vexilologické společnosti, o.s. č. 169|pages = 3319, 3320|publisher = Česká vexilologická společnost|date = 2013|location = Brno|url = http://www.moravska-vlajka.eu/dokumenty/vexilologie-169.pdf}}</ref><ref>{{cite conference|first = František|last = Pícha|title = Znaky a prapory v kronice Ottokara Štýrského|book-title = Vexilologie. Zpravodaj České vexilologické společnosti, o.s. č. 169|pages = 3320–3324|publisher = Česká vexilologická společnost|date = 2013|location = Brno|url = http://www.moravska-vlajka.eu/dokumenty/vexilologie-169.pdf}}</ref>
Habsburg Empire Crown lands: growth of the Habsburg territories and Moravia's status
Administrative division of Moravia as crown land of Austria in 1893
Jan Černý, president of Moravia in 1922–1926, later also Prime Minister of Czechoslovakia
A general map of Moravia in the 1920s
In 1928, Moravia was merged into Moravia-Silesia, one of four lands of Czechoslovakia, together with Bohemia, Slovakia and Subcarpathian Rus.
The Tatra 77 (1934)
WIKOV Supersport (1931)
Thonet No. 14 chair
The speed train Tatra M 290.0 Slovenská strela 1936
Zlín XIII aircraft on display at the National Technical Museum in Prague
Zetor 25A tractor
Comenius
Gregor Mendel
František Palacký
Jaromír Mundy
Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk
Leoš Janáček
Sigmund Freud
Edmund Husserl
Alphonse Mucha
Adolf Loos
Tomáš Baťa
Kurt Gödel
Emil Zátopek
Milan Kundera
Ivan Lendl
Electron microscope Brno
Aeroplane L 410 NG by Let Kunovice
Precise rifle scope by MeOpta
The (modern) BREN gun M 2 11
The modern street car EVO 2
Diesel railway coach class Bfhpvee295

The result was the mission of Saints Cyril and Methodius who translated liturgical books into Slavonic, which had lately been elevated by the Pope to the same level as Latin and Greek.

- Moravia

Later use of the language in a number of medieval Slavic polities resulted in the adjustment of Old Church Slavonic to the local vernacular, though a number of South Slavic, Moravian or Bulgarian features also survived.

- Old Church Slavonic

4 related topics with Alpha

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Statue of Svatopluk on Bratislava Castle, Slovakia

Svatopluk I of Moravia

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Statue of Svatopluk on Bratislava Castle, Slovakia
Statue of Svatopluk I in Loštice, Czech Republic
The ruins of a Moravian fort on Kostolec Hill at Ducové (Slovakia)
The papal letter Scire vos volumus, written in 879 by Pope John VIII to Svatopluk I
Sure and disputed territories of Great Moravia under Svatopluk I (according to modern historians)
The legend of Svatopluk's three wands
Svatopluk I disguised as a monk in the court of Arnulf, King of East Francia (from the 14th-century Chronicle of Dalimil)

Svatopluk I or Svätopluk I, also known as Svatopluk the Great (Latin: Zuentepulc, Zuentibald, Sventopulch, Zvataplug; Old Church Slavic: Свѧтопълкъ and transliterated Svętopъłkъ; Polish: Świętopełk; Greek: Σφενδοπλόκος, Sphendoplókos), was a ruler of Great Moravia, which attained its maximum territorial expansion during his reign (870–871, 871–894).

Svatopluk seems to have wanted to appease the German clergy who opposed the conducting of the liturgy in Old Church Slavonic, and he expelled the disciples of Methodius from Moravia in 886, after their teacher's death.

"Saints Cyril and Methodius holding the Cyrillic alphabet," a mural by Bulgarian iconographer Z. Zograf, 1848, Troyan Monastery

Cyril and Methodius

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Cyril (born Constantine, 826–869) and Methodius (815–885) were two brothers and Byzantine Christian theologians and missionaries.

Cyril (born Constantine, 826–869) and Methodius (815–885) were two brothers and Byzantine Christian theologians and missionaries.

"Saints Cyril and Methodius holding the Cyrillic alphabet," a mural by Bulgarian iconographer Z. Zograf, 1848, Troyan Monastery
Cyril and Methodius, painting by Jan Matejko, 1885
Saints Cyril and Methodius in Rome. Fresco in San Clemente
Saint Cyril and Methodius by Stanislav Dospevski, Bulgarian painter
The Baška tablet is an early example of the Glagolitic from Croatia
A cartoon about Saints Cyril and Methodius from Bulgaria in 1938. The caption reads : Brother Cyril, go tell those who are inside to learn the alphabet so they know freedom (свобода) and anarchy (слободия) are not the same.
Saints Cyril and Methodius procession
Basilica of St.Cyril and Methodius in Moravian Velehrad, Czech Republic
Cross Procession in Khanty-Mansiysk on Saints Cyril and Methodius Day in May 2006
Inauguration of the monument to Saints Cyril and Methodius in Saratov on Slavonic Literature and Culture Day
Thessaloniki - monument of the two Saints gift from the Bulgarian Orthodox Church
Bulgaria - Statue of the two Saints in front of the SS. Cyril and Methodius National Library in Sofia
Bulgaria - Statue of the two Saints in front of the National Palace of Culture in Sofia
North Macedonia - The monument in Ohrid
North Macedonia - Statue of Cyril and Methodius near the Stone Bridge in Skopje
Czech Republic - Statue of Saints Cyril and Methodius at the Charles Bridge in Prague
Czech Republic - Saints Cyril and Methodius monument in Mikulčice
Czech Republic - Statue of Saint Methodius at the Holy Trinity Column in Olomouc in Moravia
Ukraine - The monument in Kiev
Russia - the monument in Khanty-Mansiysk
Serbia - the monument to Saints Cyril and Methodius in Belgrade
Opening of Cyril and Methodius monument in Donetsk
Statue, Saints Cyril and Methodius, Třebíč, Czech Republic

They are credited with devising the Glagolitic alphabet, the first alphabet used to transcribe Old Church Slavonic.

It is a common misconception that Cyril and Methodius were the first to bring Christianity to Moravia, but the letter from Rastislav to Michael III states clearly that Rastislav's people "had already rejected paganism and adhere to the Christian law."

Great Moravia in the late 9th century

Great Moravia

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The first major state that was predominantly West Slavic to emerge in the area of Central Europe, possibly including territories which are today part of the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Austria, Germany, Poland, Romania, Serbia and Ukraine.

The first major state that was predominantly West Slavic to emerge in the area of Central Europe, possibly including territories which are today part of the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Austria, Germany, Poland, Romania, Serbia and Ukraine.

Great Moravia in the late 9th century
Great Moravian sword from Blatnica, unearthed in the 19th century, originally interpreted as a burial equipment from a "ducal" mound
The core of Great Moravia
Principalities and lands within Great Moravia
Jewelry from a princely burial site at Kolín, 850–900 AD
Spherical gombiki from the Mikulčice Archaeological Park
Map of Moravia within East Francia in 814
A map presenting the theory of the co-existence of two principalities (Moravia and Nitra) before the 830s
Modern depiction of Rastislav as an Orthodox saint
Constantine and Methodius in Rome
Statue of Svatopluk I on Bratislava Castle, Slovakia
The papal bull Scire vos volumus of 879 addressed to Svatopluk
Icon of St Gorazd, a disciple of St Cyril and Method of Moravian origin, who was the designated successor of archbishop Method
Svatopluk I with three twigs and his three sons—Mojmír II, Svatopluk II and Predslav
Reconstruction of a Great Moravian gatehouse and ramparts in Thunau am Kamp, Austria
Foundations of a pre-Romanesque rotunda at the Great Moravian court in Ducové
Svatopluk I disguised as a monk in the court of Arnulf, King of East Francia (from the 14th-century Chronicle of Dalimil)
Church of St. Margaret of Antioch in Kopčany, Slovakia, one of remaining buildings for which the Great Moravian origin is considered
Stone foundations of a church in Valy u Mikulčic, Czech Republic
Exhibition Among the tribes and the state. Room with the Early medieval princely burial from Kolín (Starý Kolín), 850–900 AD
An example of the Glagolitic script created by Saint Cyril for the mission in Great Moravia (Baščanska ploča from Croatia). The inscribed stone slab records Croatian king Zvonimir's donation of a piece of land to a Benedictine abbey in the time of abbot Drzhiha.
A silver cross from Mikulčice
Great Moravia in a school book

The kingdom saw the rise of the first ever Slavic literary culture in the Old Church Slavonic language as well as the expansion of Christianity, first via missionaries from East Francia, and later after the arrival of Saints Cyril and Methodius in 863 and the creation of the Glagolitic alphabet, the first alphabet dedicated to a Slavic language.

He and other historians identify the former with modern Moravia in the Czech Republic, and the latter with the Principality of Nitra in present-day Slovakia.

Classification of Czech within the Balto-Slavic branch of the Indo-European language family. Czech and Slovak make up a "Czech–Slovak" subgroup.

Czech language

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West Slavic language of the Czech–Slovak group, written in Latin script.

West Slavic language of the Czech–Slovak group, written in Latin script.

Classification of Czech within the Balto-Slavic branch of the Indo-European language family. Czech and Slovak make up a "Czech–Slovak" subgroup.
The Bible of Kralice was the first complete translation of the Bible into the Czech language from the original languages. Its six volumes were first published between 1579 and 1593.
Josef Dobrovský, whose writing played a key role in reviving Czech as a written language.
Official use of Czech in Vojvodina, Serbia (in light blue)
Praha, Texas
A Czech vowel chart
A Czech-language sign at the entrance to a children's playground
A street named after Božena Němcová with her name declined in the genitive case (a sign probably from the time of the Protectorate).
The handwritten Czech alphabet
Josef Jungmann, whose Czech-German dictionary laid the foundations for modern Standard Czech.
Dialects of Czech, Moravian, Lach, and Cieszyn Silesian spoken in the Czech Republic. The border areas, where German was formerly spoken, are now mixed.
A headstone in Český Krumlov from 1591. The inscription features the distinctive Bohemian diphthong, spelled.
Traditional territory of the main dialect groups of Moravia and Czech Silesia. Green: Central Moravian, Red: East Moravian, Yellow: Lach (Silesian), Pink: Cieszyn Silesian, Orange: Bohemian–Moravian transitional dialects, Purple: Mixed areas

The function of the written language was initially performed by Old Slavonic written in Glagolitic, later by Latin written in Latin script.

It is usually defined as an interdialect used in common speech in Bohemia and western parts of Moravia (by about two thirds of all inhabitants of the Czech Republic).