Moravian dialects

MoravianMoravian languagelocal dialectdialects in MoraviaEastern MoravianEastern Moravian dialectsHanakianHanakian dialectHaná dialectlocally
Moravian dialects (moravská nářečí, moravština) are the varieties of Czech spoken in Moravia, a historical region in the southeast of the Czech Republic.wikipedia
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Moravians

MoravianMoravians (ethnic group)
While the forms are generally viewed as regional variants of Czech, some Moravians (108,469 in the 2011 Census) claim them to be one separate Moravian language.
Moravians (Czech: Moravané or colloquially Moraváci, outdated Moravci) are a West Slavic ethnographic group from the Moravia region of the Czech Republic, who speak the Moravian dialects of the Czech language or Common Czech or a mixed form of both.

Olomouc

OlmützOlmutzOlomouc, Czech Republic
This may be due to absence of a single Moravian cultural and political centre (analogous to Prague in Bohemia) for most of the history, as well as the fact that both of its major cities—Brno and Olomouc—used to be predominantly inhabited by a German-speaking population. Central Moravian dialects, or Hanakian dialects (Hanak dialects, Haná dialects, hanácké nářečí, hanáčtina), are spoken in the central part of Moravia around Znojmo, Třebíč, Brno, Olomouc, Přerov, Zábřeh and Šumperk.
Olomouc (,, ; locally Holomóc or Olomóc; Olmütz; Ołomuniec ; Alamóc; Olomucium or Iuliomontium) is a city in Moravia, in the east of the Czech Republic.

Moravané

MoraviansThe Moravians
On the occasion of 2011 Census of the Czech Republic, several Moravian organizations (political party Moravané and Moravian National Community amongst others) led a campaign to promote the Moravian nationality and language.
Moreover, the party supports the codification and recognition of the Moravian language, traditionally considered a dialect of Czech by linguists and the public.

Haná

HanakiaHanakian
Central Moravian dialects, or Hanakian dialects (Hanak dialects, Haná dialects, hanácké nářečí, hanáčtina), are spoken in the central part of Moravia around Znojmo, Třebíč, Brno, Olomouc, Přerov, Zábřeh and Šumperk.
The Haná dialect (Hanakian dialect, hanáčtina) is spoken in the region, and is part of the Central Moravian dialect group (which is even often referred to as the "Hanakian dialects").

Moravia

Habsburg MoraviaMoravianMorava
Moravian dialects (moravská nářečí, moravština) are the varieties of Czech spoken in Moravia, a historical region in the southeast of the Czech Republic.
Some Moravians assert that Moravian is a language distinct from Czech; however, their position is not widely supported by academics and the public.

Moravian Wallachia

ValašskoMoravian VlachsWallachia
The Eastern group contains two dialects of specific interest, the Moravian Wallachian dialect (valašské nářečí, valašština) and the Moravian-Slovak dialect (slovácké nářečí, moravská slovenština).
The traditional dialect (rarely heard these days) represents a mixture of elements from the Czech and Slovak languages, and has a distinct lexicon of Romanian origin relating to the pastoral economy of the highlands.

Czech language

CzechcsCzech-language
Moravian dialects (moravská nářečí, moravština) are the varieties of Czech spoken in Moravia, a historical region in the southeast of the Czech Republic. While the former regional dialects of Bohemia have merged into one interdialect, Common Czech (with some small exceptions in borderlands), the territory of Moravia is still linguistically diversified.
The Moravian dialects spoken in the eastern part of the country are also classified as Czech, although some of their eastern variants are closer to Slovak.

Moravian Slovakia

SlováckoMoravian SlovakMoravian-Slovak
The Eastern group contains two dialects of specific interest, the Moravian Wallachian dialect (valašské nářečí, valašština) and the Moravian-Slovak dialect (slovácké nářečí, moravská slovenština).
Natives of this region speak the Eastern Moravian dialects of the Czech language, which are transitional dialects between Czech and Slovak.

Czech–Slovak languages

Czech–SlovakCzech-SlovakComparison of Czech and Slovak
Most varieties of Czech and Slovak are mutually intelligible, forming a dialect continuum (spanning the intermediate Moravian dialects) rather than two clearly distinct languages; standardised forms of these two languages are however easily distinguishable and recognizable, because of disparate vocabulary, orthography, pronunciation, phonology, suffixes and prefixes, the eastern Slovak dialects are more divergent and form a broader dialect continuum with the Lechitic subgroup of West Slavic, most notably Polish.

Hantec slang

Hantec
The dialects spoken in and around Brno have seen a lot of lexical influence from Hantec slang, a jargon incorporating many German and Yiddish loanwords into the local Central Moravian dialect.
*Moravian dialects

Ondřej Přikryl

Writers who have written in Hanakian dialect include Alois and Vilém Mrštík, Ondřej Přikryl and Jakub Obrovský.
He composed many poems and feuilletons written in the Hanakian dialect (belonging to the Central Moravian dialects).

Variety (linguistics)

varietiesvarietylect
Moravian dialects (moravská nářečí, moravština) are the varieties of Czech spoken in Moravia, a historical region in the southeast of the Czech Republic.

Czech Republic

CzechCZEthe Czech Republic
Moravian dialects (moravská nářečí, moravština) are the varieties of Czech spoken in Moravia, a historical region in the southeast of the Czech Republic.

Czech Silesia

SilesiaSilesianMoravian Silesia
The main four groups of dialects are the Bohemian-Moravian group, the Central Moravian group, the Eastern Moravian group and the Lach (Silesian) group (which is also spoken in Czech Silesia).

Dialect continuum

dialect clusterdialect chaincontinuum
Southeastern Moravian dialects form a dialect continuum with the closely related Slovak language, and are thus sometimes viewed as dialects of Slovak rather than Czech.

Slovak language

SlovakSlovakianSlovak-language
Southeastern Moravian dialects form a dialect continuum with the closely related Slovak language, and are thus sometimes viewed as dialects of Slovak rather than Czech.

Austria-Hungary

Austro-Hungarian EmpireAustro-HungarianAustria–Hungary
When regular censuses started in Austria-Hungary in 1880, the choice of main-communication languages in the forms prescribed in Cisleithania did not include Czech language but included the single item Bohemian–Moravian–Slovak (the others being German, Polish, Rusyn, Slovene, Serbo-Croatian, Italian, Romanian and Hungarian).

Cisleithania

AustrianCisleithania (Austria)Austria
When regular censuses started in Austria-Hungary in 1880, the choice of main-communication languages in the forms prescribed in Cisleithania did not include Czech language but included the single item Bohemian–Moravian–Slovak (the others being German, Polish, Rusyn, Slovene, Serbo-Croatian, Italian, Romanian and Hungarian).

Czechs

CzechCzech peopleBohemian
Respondents who chose Bohemian–Moravian–Slovak as their main communicating language were counted in the Austrian censuses as Czechs.

2011 Census of the Czech Republic

2011 census
On the occasion of 2011 Census of the Czech Republic, several Moravian organizations (political party Moravané and Moravian National Community amongst others) led a campaign to promote the Moravian nationality and language.

Moravian National Community

On the occasion of 2011 Census of the Czech Republic, several Moravian organizations (political party Moravané and Moravian National Community amongst others) led a campaign to promote the Moravian nationality and language.

Czech Statistical Office

Czech Statistical Office (CZSO)Český statistický úřad
The Czech Statistical Office assured the Moravané party that filling in “Moravian” as language would not be treated as ticking off “Czech”, because forms were processed by a computer and superseding Czech for Moravian was technically virtually impossible.

Bohemia

BohemianBöhmenAustrian Bohemia
While the former regional dialects of Bohemia have merged into one interdialect, Common Czech (with some small exceptions in borderlands), the territory of Moravia is still linguistically diversified.

Brno

BrünnBrno, Czech RepublicBrunn
This may be due to absence of a single Moravian cultural and political centre (analogous to Prague in Bohemia) for most of the history, as well as the fact that both of its major cities—Brno and Olomouc—used to be predominantly inhabited by a German-speaking population. Central Moravian dialects, or Hanakian dialects (Hanak dialects, Haná dialects, hanácké nářečí, hanáčtina), are spoken in the central part of Moravia around Znojmo, Třebíč, Brno, Olomouc, Přerov, Zábřeh and Šumperk. The dialects spoken in and around Brno have seen a lot of lexical influence from Hantec slang, a jargon incorporating many German and Yiddish loanwords into the local Central Moravian dialect.