Mordechai Yosef Leiner

Rabbi instructing children in 2004

Rabbinic Hasidic thinker and founder of the Izhbitza-Radzyn dynasty of Hasidic Judaism.

- Mordechai Yosef Leiner

20 related topics

Relevance

Tomaszów Lubelski

Town in south-eastern Poland with 19,365 inhabitants (2017).

Historic County Sejm

Mordechai Yosef Leiner (1801-1854), Hasidic thinker

Izhbitza-Radzin

Name of a dynasty of Hasidic rebbes.

Shul in Izhbitza
The Central Radziner Beis Hamedrash in Bnei Brak, which houses the Radziner Yeshiva Ateres Shlomo and the Yeshiva Tiferes Yosef
Grand Rabbi Avrohom Yissochor Englard of Radzin
Grand Rabbi Shlomo Yosef Englard of Radzin - Chanukkah Tisch 5769 (2008)
Grand Rabbi Avraham Yissachor Englard of Radzin with his eldest grandson Rabbi Nosson Nochum Englard of Radzin-Yerushalayim (seated right)
Grand Rabbi Yerucham Leiner of Radzin BP
Grand Rabbi Yaakov Leiner of Radzin BP
Grand Rabbi Moshe Leiner of Radzin, about to give over a Dvar Torah at Tish for the Yahrtzeit of the Mei HaShiloach 7 Teves 5768 (2008)
Izhbitza Ghetto, circa World War II
Photo of Warsaw Street in town of Radzin, Pre-WWII
Photo of main street in town of Radzin, Pre-WWII
Grand Rabbi Mordechai Yosef Elazar Leiner of Radzin - the Tiferes Yosef (sitting left)
Burial place of the Tiferes Yosef, in Warsaw. Rebuilt after the holocaust by his son-in-law and successor Grand Rabbi Avrohom Yissochor Englard of Radzin and his grandson Rabbi Mordechai Yosef Elazar Goldschmidt
Grand Rabbi Shmuel Shlomo Leiner of Radzin (second from left - with black beard) with a group of Radziner Hasidim in pre-war Europe
Grand Rabbi Shmuel Shlomo Leiner of Radzin (on left) with the Kolbialer Rav, one of the Rebbeim at the famous Lubliner Yeshiva
Grand Rabbi Avraham Yissachor Englard of Radzin at Havdalah following the Yahrtzeit Tisch of his brother-in-law Grand Rabbi Shmuel Shlomo Leiner of Radzin 29 Iyar 5756 (1996), at the Central Radziner Institution in Bnei Brak
Grand Rabbi Avrohom Yissachor Englard of Radzin, on his left (our right) is seen Grand Rabbi Shlomo Yosef Englard of Radzin, with a group of Radziner Chasidim
Grand Rabbi Avraham Yissachor Englard of Radzin praying at the Kosel
Radziner Chassidim in the US at the Tisch of their Rebbe Grand Rabbi Avraham Yissochor Englard of Radzin commemorating the Yahrtzeit of his father-in-law the Tiferes Yosef - at his shtiebel in Crown Heights, Brooklyn - 26 Shvat 5751 (1991)
Radziner Chasidim in the USA commemorating the Yahrtzeit of the Tiferes Yosef at the shtiebel in Crown Heights - 26 Shvat 5751 (1991)
Grand Rabbi Shlomo Yosef Englard of Radzin Hoshana Rabbah in the Central Radziner Shul in Bnei Brak
L to R: Grand Rabbi Shlomo Yosef Englard of Radzin at a Tisch in the Central Radzin Institutions in Bnei Brak. To the right is Rabbi Yitzchok Englard of Radzin-Bnei Brak, to the left is Rabbi Nosson Nochum Englard of Radzin-Yerushalayim
Grand Rabbi Shlomo Yosef Englard of Radzin (left) with Rabbi Nosson Nachum Englard of Radzin-Yerushalayim (right)
Rabbi Nosson Nochum Englard of Radzin-Yerushalayim with a group of Radziner Chassidim
Rabbi Yitzchok Englard of Radzin-Bnei Brak
The Radziner Shtiebel/Beis Midrash in Boro Park
Grand Rabbi Yerucham Leiner of Radzin at the wedding of Meir Aspes, 13 November 1958
Grand Rabbi Yerucham Leiner of Radzin speaking

The first rebbe of this dynasty was Rabbi Mordechai Yosef Leiner, author of Mei Hashiloach, in the city of Izhbitza.

Hasidic Judaism

Jewish religious group that arose as a spiritual revival movement in the territory of contemporary Western Ukraine during the 18th century, and spread rapidly throughout Eastern Europe.

300px
300px
300px
The Kaliver Rebbe, Holocaust survivor, inspiring his court on the festival of Sukkot
Kvitel requests for blessing piled on the graves of the last Lubavitcher Rebbes
Hasidic family in Borough Park, Brooklyn. The man is wearing a shtreimel, and either a bekishe or a rekel. The woman is wearing a wig, called a sheitel, as she is forbidden to show her hair in public.
Rabbi Moshe Leib Rabinovich, Munkacser Rebbe, wearing a kolpik
The Dorohoi Rebbe in his traditional rabbinical Sabbath garb
Sculpture of the Hasidic movement's celebration of spirituality on the Knesset Menorah
Israel ben Eliezer's autograph
Shivchei HaBesht (Praises of the Baal Shem Tov), the first compilation of Hasidic hagiographic storytelling, was printed from manuscripts in 1815
Palace of the Ruzhin dynasty, known for its "royal" mannerism, in Sadhora.
Belzer Rebbe Aharon Rokeach (depicted 1934), who was hidden from the Nazis and smuggled out of Europe.

Mordechai Yosef Leiner of Izbica promulgated a radical understanding of free will, which he considered illusory and also derived directly from God.

Menachem Mendel of Kotzk

Hasidic rabbi and leader.

Grave of Menachem Mendel of Kotzk

One of his major students was Rabbi Mordechai Yosef Leiner of Izbica.

Shlomo Carlebach (musician)

Rabbi, religious teacher, spiritual leader, composer, and singer dubbed "the singing rabbi" during his lifetime.

Rabbi Shlomo Carlebach (left) with Rabbi Yitzchak Ginsburgh
Carlebach's grave.

Carlebach spread the teachings of Peshischa, Chabad, and Breslov, and popularized the writings of, among others, the rebbe of Ishbitz, Mordechai Yosef Leiner, and rebbe Kalonymus Kalman Shapira of Piasetzno.

Izbica

Village in the Krasnystaw County of the Lublin Voivodeship in eastern Poland.

A black-marble cenotaph at the Jewish cemetery in Izbica

In the 19th century the town was a notable centre of Hasidic Judaism, particularly thanks to the tzadik Grand Rabbi Mordechai Yosef Leiner, who was a disciple of Mendel of Kotsk, and his son Grand Rabbi Yaacov Leiner who established the Hasidic dynasty of Ishbitz.

Zadok HaKohen

Significant Jewish thinker and Hasidic leader.

He was born into a Lithuanian Rabbinic family and then became a follower of the Hasidic Rebbe, Rabbi Mordechai Yosef Leiner of Izbica, and of Yehudah Leib Eiger (grandson of the famed Rabbi Akiva Eiger, son of Rabbi Solomon Eger, and another student of Mordechai Leiner), whom he succeeded in 1888.

Yitzchak Hutner

American Orthodox rabbi and rosh yeshiva (dean).

Yitzchak Hutner at a Purim celebration in his yeshiva
New building of Yeshiva Rabbi Chaim Berlin. The building was constructed after Hutner's death.

He would only allude in the most general ways to other great mekubalim (mystics) such as the Baal Shem Tov, the Ari, Shneur Zalman of Liadi, Mordechai Yosef Leiner of Izbitz and many other great Hasidic masters, as he did with the works of Kabbalah such as the Zohar.

Simcha Bunim of Peshischa

The second Grand Rabbi of Peshischa (Przysucha, Poland) as well as one of the key leaders of Hasidic Judaism in Poland.

Woodcut picture of Simcha Bunim ca. 1824 at the approximate age of 59, commissioned by Temerl Bergson as part of the Bergson Warsaw collection. The image was confirmed by Yaakov Aryeh Guterman who was a disciple of Simcha Bunim.
Gravesite of R. Simcha Bunim in Przysucha, Poland.

Generally speaking, those who supported R. Menachem Mendel such as R. Yitzchak Meir Alter and R. Mordechai Yosef Leiner, were the more radical of R. Simcha Bunim's followers who argued that R. Simcha Bunim was adamantly against Hasidic dynasties and never wanted his son to succeeded him.

Congregation Aish Kodesh

Orthodox synagogue in Woodmere, New York.

The Piaseczna Rav, Rabbi Kalonymus Kalman Shapira, known as the Aish Kodesh
Rabbi Moshe Weinberger

Weinberger's lectures and the daily schedule of classes for men and women draw on a wide variety of Hasidic sources, including the Baal Shem Tov, Ramchal, Rebbe Nachman of Breslov, the Baal HaTanya, and Izbica, as well as the Vilna Gaon, Rabbi Tzadok Hakohen, and Rabbi Avraham Yitzchak Kook among many others.