Morea

MoreotMoreotesMoralıMorean coastMoreotsMoréesouthern Greecethe Peloponnese peninsula in southern Greece
The Morea (Μορέας or Μωριάς) was the name of the Peloponnese peninsula in southern Greece during the Middle Ages and the early modern period.wikipedia
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Peloponnese

PeloponnesusPeloponnesianPeloponnesos
The Morea (Μορέας or Μωριάς) was the name of the Peloponnese peninsula in southern Greece during the Middle Ages and the early modern period.
During the late Middle Ages and the Ottoman era, the peninsula was known as the Morea, a name still in colloquial use in its demotic form .

Despotate of the Morea

Despot of the MoreaDespotate of MoreaMorea
The name was used for the Byzantine province known as the Despotate of the Morea, by the Ottoman Empire for the Morea Eyalet, and by the Republic of Venice for the short-lived Kingdom of the Morea. In the mid-14th century, the later Byzantine Emperor John VI Kantakouzenos reorganized Morea into the Despotate of the Morea.
Its territory varied in size during its existence but eventually grew to include almost all the southern Greek peninsula known as the Peloponnese, which was known as the Morea during the medieval and early modern periods.

Kingdom of the Morea

Venetian ruleMoreain Venetian hands
The name was used for the Byzantine province known as the Despotate of the Morea, by the Ottoman Empire for the Morea Eyalet, and by the Republic of Venice for the short-lived Kingdom of the Morea.
The Kingdom of the Morea or Realm of the Morea (Regno di Morea) was the official name the Republic of Venice gave to the Peloponnese peninsula in southern Greece (which was more widely known as the Morea until the 19th century) when it was conquered from the Ottoman Empire during the Morean War in 1684–99.

Principality of Achaea

Prince of AchaeaAchaeaPrinces of Achaea
They created the Principality of Achaea, a largely Greek-inhabited statelet ruled by a Latin (Western) autocrat.
The Principality of Achaea or of the Morea was one of the three vassal states of the Latin Empire which replaced the Byzantine Empire after the capture of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade.

Mystras

MistraMistrasMystra
The most important prince in the Morea was Guillaume II de Villehardouin (1246–1278), who fortified Mistra (Mystras) near the site of Sparta in 1249.
In late 1248, William II of Villehardouin, ruler of the Frankish Principality of Achaea, captured Monemvasia, the last remaining Byzantine outpost on the Morea.

William of Villehardouin

William II of VillehardouinWilliam II VillehardouinWilliam II
The most important prince in the Morea was Guillaume II de Villehardouin (1246–1278), who fortified Mistra (Mystras) near the site of Sparta in 1249.
As prince he conquered the remaining territory of the Peloponnese (known at the time as Morea) and built the fortress of Mistra near Sparta.

Battle of Prinitza

PrinitzaBattle of PrinitsaPrinitsa
An initial Byzantine drive to reconquer the entire peninsula failed in the battles of Prinitza and Makryplagi, and the Byzantines and Franks settled to an uneasy coexistence.
1246 – 1278)). In exchange for his freedom, William agreed to hand over a number of fortresses in the southeastern part of the Morea peninsula.

Morus (plant)

mulberrymulberriesMorus
Traditionally scholars thought the name originated from the word morea, meaning morus or mulberry, a tree which, though known in the region from the ancient times, gained value after the 6th century, when mulberry-eating silkworms were smuggled from China to Byzantium.
Mulberries are also widespread in Greece, particularly in the Peloponnese, which in the Middle Ages was known as Morea, deriving from the Greek word for the tree (undefined, ).

Battle of Makryplagi

Makryplagidefeated and capturedMakryplagi campaign
An initial Byzantine drive to reconquer the entire peninsula failed in the battles of Prinitza and Makryplagi, and the Byzantines and Franks settled to an uneasy coexistence.
At Makryplagi, the Byzantines suffered a heavy defeat, which together with their defeat at the Battle of Prinitza the previous year ended their attempted reconquest of the Morea.

John VI Kantakouzenos

John KantakouzenosJohn VI CantacuzenusJohn VI
In the mid-14th century, the later Byzantine Emperor John VI Kantakouzenos reorganized Morea into the Despotate of the Morea.
Born in Constantinople, John Kantakouzenos was the son of Michael Kantakouzenos, governor of the Morea; Donald Nicol speculates that he may have been born after his father's death and raised as an only child.

Republic of Venice

VenetianVeniceVenetian Republic
The name was used for the Byzantine province known as the Despotate of the Morea, by the Ottoman Empire for the Morea Eyalet, and by the Republic of Venice for the short-lived Kingdom of the Morea. The peninsula was captured for the Republic of Venice by Francesco Morosini during the Morean War of 1684–99.
In 1684, however, taking advantage of the Ottoman involvement against Austria in the Great Turkish War, the republic initiated the Morean War, which lasted until 1699 and in which it was able to conquer the Morea peninsula in southern Greece.

Morean War

Sixth Ottoman–Venetian WarwarBattle of Patras
The peninsula was captured for the Republic of Venice by Francesco Morosini during the Morean War of 1684–99.
Military operations ranged from Dalmatia to the Aegean Sea, but the war's major campaign was the Venetian conquest of the Morea (Peloponnese) peninsula in southern Greece.

Michael VIII Palaiologos

Michael VIIIMichael VIII PalaeologusMichael Palaiologos
After losing the Battle of Pelagonia (1259) against the Byzantine Emperor Michael VIII Palaeologus, Guillaume was forced to ransom himself by giving up most of the eastern part of Morea and his newly built strongholds.
In 1263 Michael sent 15,000 men, including 5,000 Seljuk mercenaries, to Morea with the goal of conquering the Principality of Achaea, but this expedition failed in a surprise rout at Prinitza.

Greek War of Independence

Greek RevolutionGreek independenceGreek Revolution of 1821
Ultimately, the Morea and its inhabitants provided the cradle and backbone of the Greek Revolution.
Throughout the 17th century there was great resistance to the Ottomans in the Morea and elsewhere, as evidenced by revolts led by Dionysius the Philosopher.

Francesco Morosini

Francescogreat venetian DogeMorosini
The peninsula was captured for the Republic of Venice by Francesco Morosini during the Morean War of 1684–99.
Over the next several years, he captured the Morea with the help of Otto Wilhelm Königsmarck, as well as Lefkada and parts of western Greece.

Klepht

klephtsklephteskleft
Armed bands of the klephts emerged, undeterred by the brutal repression of the Orlov Revolt.
Ottoman lands were divided up into pashaliks, also called eyalets; in the case of the lands that form present-day Greece, these were Morea and Roumelia.

Chronicle of the Morea

Chronicle of MoreaMorea, Chronicle of the
The anonymous 14th century Chronicle of the Morea relates events of the Franks' establishment of feudalism in mainland Greece following the Fourth Crusade.
West European Crusaders settled in the Peloponnese (called Morea at the time) following the Fourth Crusade.

Orlov revolt

Orlov eventsFirst Archipelago Expeditionrevolt
Armed bands of the klephts emerged, undeterred by the brutal repression of the Orlov Revolt.
Russia planned to incite Orthodox Christians to revolt, and sent agents to Bosnia, Herzegovina, Montenegro, Albania, Crete and the Morea.

List of Greek place names

List of traditional Greek place namesGreekGreek placenames
* List of traditional Greek place names

Greece

GreekHellenic RepublicGreeks
The Morea (Μορέας or Μωριάς) was the name of the Peloponnese peninsula in southern Greece during the Middle Ages and the early modern period.

Middle Ages

medievalmediaevalmedieval Europe
The Morea (Μορέας or Μωριάς) was the name of the Peloponnese peninsula in southern Greece during the Middle Ages and the early modern period.

Early modern period

early moderncolonial eraearly modern era
The Morea (Μορέας or Μωριάς) was the name of the Peloponnese peninsula in southern Greece during the Middle Ages and the early modern period.

Ottoman Empire

OttomanOttomansTurks
The name was used for the Byzantine province known as the Despotate of the Morea, by the Ottoman Empire for the Morea Eyalet, and by the Republic of Venice for the short-lived Kingdom of the Morea.

Morea Eyalet

MoreaSanjak of the MoreaEyalet of the Morea
The name was used for the Byzantine province known as the Despotate of the Morea, by the Ottoman Empire for the Morea Eyalet, and by the Republic of Venice for the short-lived Kingdom of the Morea.

Byzantine Empire

ByzantineEastern Roman EmpireByzantines
The name was used for the Byzantine province known as the Despotate of the Morea, by the Ottoman Empire for the Morea Eyalet, and by the Republic of Venice for the short-lived Kingdom of the Morea.