Morphological derivation

derivationderivationalderivedderivational morphologyderivativederivativesderivederivational suffixderivationsderivational affixes
Morphological derivation, in linguistics, is the process of forming a new word from an existing word, often by adding a prefix or suffix, such as un- or -ness.wikipedia
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Prefix

prefixesprefixationquasi-
Morphological derivation, in linguistics, is the process of forming a new word from an existing word, often by adding a prefix or suffix, such as un- or -ness.
Prefixes, like other affixes, can be either inflectional, creating a new form of the word with the same basic meaning and same lexical category (but playing a different role in the sentence), or derivational, creating a new word with a new semantic meaning and sometimes also a different lexical category.

Suffix

suffixesendingsuffixation
Morphological derivation, in linguistics, is the process of forming a new word from an existing word, often by adding a prefix or suffix, such as un- or -ness.
Derivational suffixes can be divided into two categories: class-changing derivation and class-maintaining derivation.

Affix

suffixaffixesaffixation
Derivational morphology often involves the addition of a derivational suffix or other affix.
Affixes may be derivational, like English -ness and pre-, or inflectional, like English plural -s and past tense -ed.

Inflection

inflectedinflectional morphologyinflectional
It is differentiated from inflection, which is the modification of a word to form different grammatical categories without changing its core meaning: determines, determining, and determined are from the root determine. Derivation can be contrasted with inflection, in that derivation can produce a new word (a distinct lexeme) but isn't required to change this, whereas inflection produces grammatical variants of the same word.
In contrast, derivation is the process of adding derivational morphemes, which create a new word from existing words and change the semantic meaning or the part of speech of the affected word, such as by changing a noun to a verb.

Conversion (word formation)

conversionverbificationverbified
When derivation occurs without any change to the word, such as in the conversion of the noun breakfast into the verb to breakfast, it's known as conversion, or zero derivation.
In linguistics, conversion, also called zero derivation or null derivation, is a kind of word formation involving the creation of a word (of a new word class) from an existing word (of a different word class) without any change in form, which is to say, derivation using only zero.

Nominalization

nominalizednominalizernominalisation
Derivation that results in a noun may be called nominalization.
The term refers, for instance, to the process of producing a noun from another part of speech by adding a derivational affix (e.g., the noun legalization from the verb legalize).

Adjective

adjectivesadjectivalattributive adjective
For example, the English derivational suffix -ly changes adjectives into adverbs (slow → slowly).
In languages that have adjectives as a word class, it is usually an open class; that is, it is relatively common for new adjectives to be formed via such processes as derivation.

Agent noun

agentivenomen agentisagent
Usually, derived in the above definition has the strict sense attached to it in morphology, that is the derivation takes as an input a lexeme (an abstract unit of morphological analysis) and produces a new lexeme.

Morpheme

morphemesmorphemicderivational
However, it is important to note that derivations and inflections can share homonyms, that being, morphemes that have the same sound, but not the same meaning.
* Derivational morphemes, when combined with a root, change the semantic meaning or the part of speech of the affected word.

Lexeme

lexemeslexicallexical root
Derivation can be contrasted with inflection, in that derivation can produce a new word (a distinct lexeme) but isn't required to change this, whereas inflection produces grammatical variants of the same word.

Compound (linguistics)

compoundcompound wordcompounds
In that respect, derivation differs from compounding by which free morphemes are combined (lawsuit, Latin professor).
The addition of affix morphemes to words (such as suffixes or prefixes, as in employ → employment) should not be confused with nominal composition, as this is actually morphological derivation.

Bound and free morphemes

bound morphemefree morphemebound
Note that derivational affixes are bound morphemes – they are meaningful units, but can only normally occur when attached to another word.
Affixes may be inflectional, indicating how a certain word relates to other words in a larger phrase, or derivational, changing either the part of speech or the actual meaning of a word.

Part of speech

parts of speechclosed classword class
Such an affix usually applies to words of one lexical category (part of speech) and changes them into words of another such category.
Words are added to open classes through such processes as compounding, derivation, coining, and borrowing.

Morphology (linguistics)

morphologymorphologicalmorphologically
Derivational morphology often involves the addition of a derivational suffix or other affix.
There is a further distinction between two primary kinds of morphological word formation: derivation and compounding.

Linguistics

linguistlinguisticlinguists
Morphological derivation, in linguistics, is the process of forming a new word from an existing word, often by adding a prefix or suffix, such as un- or -ness.

Grammatical category

grammatical categoriescategoriescategory
It is differentiated from inflection, which is the modification of a word to form different grammatical categories without changing its core meaning: determines, determining, and determined are from the root determine.

Word

wordsverballexical
Such an affix usually applies to words of one lexical category (part of speech) and changes them into words of another such category.

English language

EnglishEnglish-languageen
For example, the English derivational suffix -ly changes adjectives into adverbs (slow → slowly).

Adverb

adverbsadv.abstract noun
For example, the English derivational suffix -ly changes adjectives into adverbs (slow → slowly).

Labial consonant

LabiallabialsBilabial
En- (replaced by em- before labials) is usually a transitive marker on verbs, but it can also be applied to adjectives and nouns to form transitive verbs: circle (verb) → encircle (verb) but rich (adj) → enrich (verb), large (adj) → enlarge (verb), rapture (noun) → enrapture (verb), slave (noun) → enslave (verb).