Morse code

MorseInternational Morse CodeMorse-codeCWMorse alphabetcodemilitary signalsMorse signalsMorse-coded(Morse) code
Morse code is a character encoding scheme used in telecommunication that encodes text characters as standardized sequences of two different signal durations called dots and dashes or dits and dahs.wikipedia
1,319 Related Articles

Samuel Morse

Samuel F. B. MorseSamuel F.B. MorseMorse
Morse code is named for Samuel F. B. Morse, an inventor of the telegraph.
He was a co-developer of Morse code and helped to develop the commercial use of telegraphy.

Delimiter

delimiter collisiondelimiteddelimit
The letters of a word are separated by a space of duration equal to three dots, and the words are separated by a space equal to seven dots.
Another example of a delimiter is the time gap used to separate letters and words in the transmission of Morse code.

Morse code for non-Latin alphabets

non-Latin MorseCyrillic Morse code alphabetMorse alphabets
Because many non-English natural languages use other than the 26 Roman letters, Morse alphabets have been developed for those languages.
This is a summary of the use of Morse code to represent alphabets other than Latin.

SOS

S.O.S.SOS signaldistress call
The most common distress signal is SOS – three dots, three dashes, and three dots – internationally recognized by treaty.
In International Morse Code three dots form the letter "S" and three dashes make the letter "O", so "S O S" became a common way to remember the order of the dots and dashes.

Character encoding

character setComputer encodingsencoding
Morse code is a character encoding scheme used in telecommunication that encodes text characters as standardized sequences of two different signal durations called dots and dashes or dits and dahs.
The earliest well-known electrically-transmitted character code, Morse code, introduced in the 1840s, used a system of four "symbols" (short signal, long signal, short space, long space) to generate codes of variable length.

Electrical telegraph

electric telegraphtelegraphtelegraph line
Following the discovery of electromagnetism by Hans Christian Ørsted in 1820 and the invention of the electromagnet by William Sturgeon in 1824, there were developments in electromagnetic telegraphy in Europe and America.
At the sending station, an operator would tap on a switch called a telegraph key, spelling out text messages in Morse code.

Telecommunication

telecommunicationscommunicationstelecom
Morse code is a character encoding scheme used in telecommunication that encodes text characters as standardized sequences of two different signal durations called dots and dashes or dits and dahs.
His code was an important advance over Wheatstone's signaling method.

American Morse code

American Morse
This code was used since 1844 and became known as Morse landline code or American Morse code.
American Morse Code — also known as Railroad Morse—is the latter-day name for the original version of the Morse Code developed in the mid-1840s, by Samuel Morse and Alfred Vail for their electric telegraph.

Telegraphy

telegraphtelegramcable
Morse code is named for Samuel F. B. Morse, an inventor of the telegraph.
The Morse system was adopted as the international standard in 1865, using a modified Morse code developed in Germany.

Spark-gap transmitter

spark gap transmitterspark transmitterspark transmitters
Although previous transmitters were bulky and the spark gap system of transmission was difficult to use, there had been some earlier attempts.
So spark-gap transmitters could not transmit audio, and instead transmitted information by radiotelegraphy; the operator switched the transmitter on and off with a telegraph key, creating pulses of radio waves to spell out text messages in Morse code.

Wireless telegraphy

wireless telegraphradiotelegraphywireless
On the other hand, when the first airplane flight was made from California to Australia in 1928 on the Southern Cross, one of its four crewmen was its radio operator who communicated with ground stations via radio telegraph.
In radiotelegraphy, information is transmitted by pulses of radio waves of two different lengths called "dots" and "dashes", which spell out text messages, usually in Morse code.

Friedrich Clemens Gerke

Friedrich GerkeFr. ClemensGerke
The Morse code, as it is used internationally today, was derived from a much refined proposal by Friedrich Clemens Gerke in 1848 that became known as the "Hamburg alphabet".
Friedrich Clemens Gerke (22 January 1801 – 21 May 1888) was a German writer, journalist, musician and pioneer of telegraphy who revised the Morse code in 1848.

Prosigns for Morse code

prosignprocedural signalprosigns
The International Morse Code encodes the 26 English letters A through Z, some non-English letters, the Arabic numerals and a small set of punctuation and procedural signals (prosigns).
Procedure signs or prosigns are shorthand signals used in Morse code radio telegraphy procedures, for the purpose of simplifying and standardizing communications related to radio operating issues among two or more radio operators.

On–off keying

on-off keyingOOKkeyed
Morse code is usually transmitted by on-off keying of an information-carrying medium such as electric current, radio waves, visible light, or sound waves.
On-off keying is most commonly used to transmit Morse code over radio frequencies (referred to as CW (continuous wave) operation), although in principle any digital encoding scheme may be used.

KPH (radio station)

KPHKPH (radio)KPH Radio
Licensees have reactivated the old California coastal Morse station KPH and regularly transmit from the site under either this Call sign or as KSM.
For most of the 20th century, it provided ship to shore communications including telegrams (using Morse code) and marine telex service (using radioteletype).

500 kHz

415–526.5 kHz maritime band500kHz600 meters
The United States Coast Guard has ceased all use of Morse code on the radio, and no longer monitors any radio frequencies for Morse code transmissions, including the international medium frequency (MF) distress frequency of 500 kHz.
The radio frequency of 500 kilohertz (500 kHz) has been an international calling and distress frequency for Morse code maritime communication since early in the 20th century.

Telegraph sounder

soundersSounder
By making the two clicks sound different with one ivory and one metal stop, the single needle device became an audible instrument, which led in turn to the Double Plate Sounder System.
When a telegraph message comes in it produces an audible "clicking" sound representing the short and long keypresses – "dots" and "dashes" – which are used to represent text characters in Morse code.

Theodore Roosevelt McElroy

Ted R. McElroy
In July 1939 at a contest in Asheville, North Carolina in the United States Ted R. McElroy W1JYN set a still-standing record for Morse copying, 75.2 wpm.
He holds the all-time speed record for receiving Morse code.

Amateur radio

ham radioamateur radio licenseamateur
International Morse code today is most popular among amateur radio operators, in the mode commonly referred to as "continuous wave" or "CW".
The term "ham" was first a pejorative term used in professional wired telegraphy during the 19th century, to mock operators with poor Morse code-sending skills ("ham-fisted").

Continuous wave

CWcontinuous-wavecontinuous-wave operation
International Morse code today is most popular among amateur radio operators, in the mode commonly referred to as "continuous wave" or "CW".
Information is carried in the varying duration of the on and off periods of the signal, for example by Morse code in early radio.

Radio navigation

radionavigation serviceradio navigation aidradionavigation
In aviation, pilots use radio navigation aids.
As the antenna rotated through a fixed position, typically due north, the antenna was keyed with the morse code signal of the station's identification letters so the receiver could ensure they were listening to the right station.

Telegraph key

Morse keykeyfist
Although the traditional telegraph key (straight key) is still used by some amateurs, the use of mechanical semi-automatic keyers (known as "bugs") and of fully automatic electronic keyers is prevalent today.
A telegraph key is a specialized electrical switch used by a trained operator to transmit text messages in telegraph systems, usually in Morse code.

Radio

radio communicationradio communicationswireless
When Morse code was adapted to radio communication, the dots and dashes were sent as short and long tone pulses.

Non-directional beacon

NDBNDB approachnon-directional beacon (NDB)
Radio navigation aids such as VORs and NDBs for aeronautical use broadcast identifying information in the form of Morse Code, though many VOR stations now also provide voice identification.
Each NDB is identified by a one, two, or three-letter Morse code callsign.

Signal lamp

Aldis lampMorse lampAldis lamps
Warships, including those of the U.S. Navy, have long used signal lamps to exchange messages in Morse code.
A signal lamp (sometimes called an Aldis lamp, after Arthur Cyril Webb Aldis, who invented a widely used design, or a Morse lamp ) is a visual signaling device for optical communication, typically using Morse code.