Moselle (department)

MoselleMoselle departmentdepartment of MoselleMoselle ''départementLorraine57Etang de LindreMosellanMosellansMoselle (''département'')
Moselle is the most populous department in Lorraine, in the east of France, and is named after the river Moselle, a tributary of the Rhine, which flows through the western part of the department.wikipedia
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Departments of France

departmentdépartementdepartments
Moselle is the most populous department in Lorraine, in the east of France, and is named after the river Moselle, a tributary of the Rhine, which flows through the western part of the department.
The department of Bas-Rhin and parts of Meurthe, Moselle, Vosges and Haut-Rhin were ceded to the German Empire in 1871, following France's defeat in the Franco-Prussian War.

Lorraine

Lorraine (region)Lorraine regionLothringen
Moselle is the most populous department in Lorraine, in the east of France, and is named after the river Moselle, a tributary of the Rhine, which flows through the western part of the department.
As a region in modern France, Lorraine consisted of the four departments Meurthe-et-Moselle, Meuse, Moselle and Vosges (of an historical point of view the Haute-Marne department is located in the region), containing 2,337 communes.

Momerstroff

In 1793, France annexed the enclaves of Manderen, Lixing-lès-Rouhling, Momerstroff, and Créhange (Kriechingen) – all possessions of princes of the Duchy of Luxemburg – a state of the Holy Roman Empire, and incorporated them into the Moselle département.
Momerstroff (Momersdorf) is a commune in the Moselle department in Grand Est in north-eastern France.

Manderen

Castle of ManderenTunting
In 1793, France annexed the enclaves of Manderen, Lixing-lès-Rouhling, Momerstroff, and Créhange (Kriechingen) – all possessions of princes of the Duchy of Luxemburg – a state of the Holy Roman Empire, and incorporated them into the Moselle département.
Manderen (Mandern) is a former commune in the Moselle department in Grand Est in north-eastern France.

Metz

Metz, FranceDivodurumBishop of Metz
Its prefecture (capital) was Metz.
Metz is the prefecture of the Moselle department and the seat of the parliament of the Grand Est region.

Créhange

Criechingen
In 1793, France annexed the enclaves of Manderen, Lixing-lès-Rouhling, Momerstroff, and Créhange (Kriechingen) – all possessions of princes of the Duchy of Luxemburg – a state of the Holy Roman Empire, and incorporated them into the Moselle département.
Créhange (Lorraine Franconian and German Krischingen) is a commune in the Moselle department in Grand Est in north-eastern France.

Lixing-lès-Rouhling

LixingLordship of Lixing
In 1793, France annexed the enclaves of Manderen, Lixing-lès-Rouhling, Momerstroff, and Créhange (Kriechingen) – all possessions of princes of the Duchy of Luxemburg – a state of the Holy Roman Empire, and incorporated them into the Moselle département.
Lixing-lès-Rouhling (Lixingen) is a commune in the Moselle department in Grand Est in north-eastern France.

Thionville

DiedenhofenGarcheVolkrange
It had four arrondissements: Metz, Briey, Sarreguemines, and Thionville.
Thionville (Diddenuewen; Diedenhofen ) is a commune in the northeastern French department of Moselle.

Sarreguemines

SaargemündSarreguemines ConfluencesFolpersviller
It had four arrondissements: Metz, Briey, Sarreguemines, and Thionville.
Sarreguemines (German:, Lorraine Franconian: Saargemìnn) is a commune in the Moselle department of the Grand Est administrative region in north-eastern France.

Alsace-Lorraine

Alsace-MoselleAlsace and LorraineElsass-Lothringen
Bismarck omitted only one-fifth of Moselle (the arrondissement of Briey in the extreme west of the department) from annexation, (Bismarck later regretted his decision when it was discovered that the region of Briey and Longwy had rich iron-ore deposits.) The Moselle department ceased to exist on May 18, 1871, and the eastern four-fifths of Moselle was annexed to Germany merged with the also German-annexed eastern third of the Meurthe Department into the German Department of Lorraine, based in Metz, within the newly established Imperial State of Alsace-Lorraine.
The Imperial Territory of Alsace-Lorraine (Reichsland Elsaß-Lothringen or Elsass-Lothringen; ; Moselle Franconian/D'Räichland Elsass-Loutrengen) was a territory created by the German Empire in 1871, after it annexed most of Alsace and the Moselle department of Lorraine following its victory in the Franco-Prussian War.

Sierck-les-Bains

Sierck
As a result, France ceded the exclave of Tholey (now in Saarland, Germany) as well as a few communes near Sierck-les-Bains (both territories until then part of the Moselle département) to Austria.
Sierck-les-Bains (Bad Sierck, Lorraine Franconian: Siirk/Siirck) is a commune in the Moselle department in Grand Est in north-eastern France.

Arrondissements of France

arrondissementarrondissementsdepartmental arrondissements
It had four arrondissements: Metz, Briey, Sarreguemines, and Thionville.

Meurthe-et-Moselle

Meurthe et MoselleMeurthe-et-Moselle ''département54
France merged the remaining area of Briey with the truncated Meurthe department to create the new Meurthe-et-Moselle department (a new name chosen on purpose to remind people of the lost Moselle department) with its préfecture at Nancy. Moselle is part of the current region of Grand Est and is surrounded by the French departments of Meurthe-et-Moselle and Bas-Rhin, as well as Germany (states of Saarland and Rhineland-Palatinate) and Luxembourg in the north.
Meurthe-et-Moselle is part of the administrative region of Grand Est and the traditional region of Lorraine and is surrounded by the departments of Meuse, Vosges, Bas-Rhin, and Moselle; and by the nations of Luxembourg and Belgium.

Sarrebourg

SaarburgSaarburg (Sarrebourg)
Having lost the area of Briey, it had now gained the areas of Château-Salins and Sarrebourg which before 1871 had formed one-third of the Meurthe department and which had been part of the Reichsland of Alsace-Lorraine since 1871.
Sarrebourg (Saarburg, Lorraine Franconian: Saarbuerj) is a commune in the Moselle department in Grand Est in north-eastern France.

Saarland

SaarSaar regionSaar area
As a result, France ceded the exclave of Tholey (now in Saarland, Germany) as well as a few communes near Sierck-les-Bains (both territories until then part of the Moselle département) to Austria. Moselle is part of the current region of Grand Est and is surrounded by the French departments of Meurthe-et-Moselle and Bas-Rhin, as well as Germany (states of Saarland and Rhineland-Palatinate) and Luxembourg in the north.
The state borders France (département of Moselle, which forms part of the région of Grand Est) to the south and west, Luxembourg (Grevenmacher District) to the west and Rheinland-Pfalz to the north and the east.

Château-Salins

Chateau-SalinsSalzburg (Château-Salins)Salzburgen
Having lost the area of Briey, it had now gained the areas of Château-Salins and Sarrebourg which before 1871 had formed one-third of the Meurthe department and which had been part of the Reichsland of Alsace-Lorraine since 1871.
Château-Salins (Salzburg, from 1941–44 Salzburgen) is a commune in the Moselle department in Grand Est in north-eastern France.

Treaty of Frankfurt (1871)

Treaty of Frankfurtceded to Germany1871
After the French defeat in the Franco-Prussian War of 1870–71, almost all of the Moselle department, along with Alsace and portions of the Meurthe and Vosges departments, went to the German Empire by the Treaty of Frankfurt on the grounds that most of the population in those areas spoke German dialects.

Jean Burger

Mario
Several organized groups were formed in resistance to the German occupation, notably the Groupe Mario, led by Jean Burger, and the Groupe Derhan.
He rose rapidly in the Communist Party and became departmental secretary for the Moselle anti-fascist movement Paix et Liberté ("Peace and Liberty").

Lorraine Franconian

FranciqueFrankishLorraine
As a result of German aggression during the war, the French Government actively discouraged the German heritage of the region, and the local German Lorraine Franconian dialects ceased to be used in the public realm.
Lorraine Franconian (Lorraine Franconian: Plàtt or lottrìnger Plàtt; francique lorrain or platt lorrain; Lothringisch) is an ambiguous designation for dialects of West Central German (Westmitteldeutsch), a group of High German dialects spoken in the Moselle department of the former north-eastern French region of Lorraine (See Linguistic boundary of Moselle).

Bas-Rhin

Bas Rhin67Bas-Rhin département
Moselle is part of the current region of Grand Est and is surrounded by the French departments of Meurthe-et-Moselle and Bas-Rhin, as well as Germany (states of Saarland and Rhineland-Palatinate) and Luxembourg in the north.
To the south lies the department of Haut-Rhin, the town of Colmar and southern Alsace, and to the west the department of Moselle.

Franco-Prussian War

Franco-German WarWar of 1870Franco Prussian War
After the French defeat in the Franco-Prussian War of 1870–71, almost all of the Moselle department, along with Alsace and portions of the Meurthe and Vosges departments, went to the German Empire by the Treaty of Frankfurt on the grounds that most of the population in those areas spoke German dialects.
Bismarck met Favre on 18 September at the Château de Ferrières and demanded a frontier immune to a French war of revenge, which included Strasbourg, Alsace and most of the Moselle department in Lorraine of which Metz was the capital.

Moselle

Moselle RiverMoselRiver Moselle
Moselle is the most populous department in Lorraine, in the east of France, and is named after the river Moselle, a tributary of the Rhine, which flows through the western part of the department.
The river subsequently gave its name to two French republican départements: Moselle and Meurthe-et-Moselle.

Alsace

AlsatianAlsatiansElsass
After the French defeat in the Franco-Prussian War of 1870–71, almost all of the Moselle department, along with Alsace and portions of the Meurthe and Vosges departments, went to the German Empire by the Treaty of Frankfurt on the grounds that most of the population in those areas spoke German dialects.
In 1951, Article 10 of the Deixonne Law (Loi Deixonne) on the teaching of local languages and dialects made provision for Breton, Basque, Catalan and old Provençal, but not for Corsican, Dutch (West Flemish) or Alsatian in Alsace and Moselle.

Malgré-nous

combattants alors sous l’uniforme allemandconscripted into the German Army by forceincorporation
Adolf Hitler considered Moselle and Alsace parts of Germany, and as a result the inhabitants were drafted into the German Wehrmacht.
Based on orders from Gauleiter Robert Heinrich Wagner, the regional military governor of Alsace, of 25 August 1942, some 100,000 Alsatians and 30,000 Mosellans were drafted by force into the German armed forces.

Longwy

Longwy-Briey
Bismarck omitted only one-fifth of Moselle (the arrondissement of Briey in the extreme west of the department) from annexation, (Bismarck later regretted his decision when it was discovered that the region of Briey and Longwy had rich iron-ore deposits.) The Moselle department ceased to exist on May 18, 1871, and the eastern four-fifths of Moselle was annexed to Germany merged with the also German-annexed eastern third of the Meurthe Department into the German Department of Lorraine, based in Metz, within the newly established Imperial State of Alsace-Lorraine.
After the French defeat in the Franco-Prussian War of 1870–71, almost all of the Moselle department, along with Alsace and portions of the Meurthe and Vosges departments, was ceded to the German Empire by the Treaty of Frankfurt on the ground that the population in those areas spoke German dialects.