A report on Moses ben Jacob Cordovero

Cordovero's grave in Safed

Central figure in the historical development of Kabbalah, leader of a mystical school in 16th-century Safed, Ottoman Syria.

- Moses ben Jacob Cordovero
Cordovero's grave in Safed

18 related topics with Alpha

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Jewish Kabbalists portrayed in 1641; woodcut on paper. Saxon University Library, Dresden.

Kabbalah

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Esoteric method, discipline and school of thought in Jewish mysticism.

Esoteric method, discipline and school of thought in Jewish mysticism.

Jewish Kabbalists portrayed in 1641; woodcut on paper. Saxon University Library, Dresden.
Kabbalistic prayer book from Italy, 1803. Jewish Museum of Switzerland, Basel.
Latin translation of Gikatilla's Shaarei Ora
The Ark of the Covenant in Solomon's Temple was the seat for God's presence. Ezekiel and Isaiah had prophetic visions of the angelic heavenly Chariot and Divine Throne
Grave of Rabbi Akiva in Tiberias. He features in Hekhalot mystical literature, and as one of the four who entered the Pardes
The grave of Shimon bar Yochai in Meron before 1899. A Talmudic Tanna, he is the mystical teacher in the central Kabbalistic work, the Zohar
The 13th-century eminence of Nachmanides, a classic rabbinic figure, gave Kabbalah mainstream acceptance through his Torah commentary
The leading scholars of Safed in 16th-century invigorated mainstream Judaism through new legal, liturgical, exegetical and Lurianic-mythological developments.
Synagogue Beit El Jerusalem. Oriental Judaism has its own chain of Kabbalah
The 16th-century Maharal of Prague articulated a mystical exegesis in philosophical language
Moshe Chaim Luzzatto, a leading Italian kabbalist, also wrote secular works, which the Haskalah see as the start of modern Hebrew literature
The Vilna Gaon, 18th-century leader of rabbinic opposition to Hasidism—a Kabbalist who opposed Hasidic doctrinal and practical innovations
Synagogue of the Baal Shem Tov, founder of Hasidism, in Medzhybizh (Ukraine). It gave a new phase to Jewish mysticism, seeking its popularisation through internal correspondence.
The Kabbalist (c. 1910–1920), portrait of an Hasidic man in Jewish religious clothing performed by the Austro-Hungarian Jewish painter Isidor Kaufmann (Jewish Museum, New York)
Metaphorical scheme of emanated spiritual worlds within the Ein Sof
Scheme of descending Sephirot in three columns, as a tree with roots above and branches below
In the 16–17th centuries Kabbalah was popularised through a new genre of ethical literature, related to Kabbalistic meditation
Amulet from the 15th century. Theosophical kabbalists, especially Luria, censored contemporary Practical Kabbalah, but allowed amulets by Sages
Joseph Karo's role as both legalist and mystic underscores Kabbalah's spiritualisation of normative Jewish observance
Building on Kabbalah's conception of the soul, Abraham Abulafia's meditations included the "inner illumination of" the human form
16th-century graves of Safed, Galilee. The messianic focus of its mystical renaissance culminated in Lurianic thought.
Title page of first printed edition of the Zohar, main sourcebook of Kabbalah, from Mantua, Italy in 1558
Golden age of Spanish Judaism on the Knesset Menorah, Maimonides holding Aristotle's work
Kabbalah mysticism on the Knesset Menorah, which shared some similarities of theory with Jewish Neoplatonists
Tikkun for reading through the night of Shavuot, a popular Jewish custom from the Safed Kabbalists
A version of Lekhah Dodi song to welcome the Shabbat, a cross denomination Jewish custom from Kabbalah

Abulafian elements were later incorporated into the 16th century theosophical Kabbalistic systemisations of Moses Cordovero and Hayim Vital.

Jewish diaspora expulsions. The 1492 Expulsion from Spain, motivated the messianic-national orientation of the Rabbinic scholars and mystics in 16th century Safed. Lurianism systemised this in its new Kabbalistic redemption scheme

Tohu and Tikun

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Olam HaTohu (עוֹלָם הַתֹּ֫הוּ "The World of Tohu-Chaos/Confusion") and Olam HaTikun ( "The World of Tikun-Order/Rectification") are two general stages in Jewish Kabbalah, in the order of descending spiritual worlds (Olamot).

Olam HaTohu (עוֹלָם הַתֹּ֫הוּ "The World of Tohu-Chaos/Confusion") and Olam HaTikun ( "The World of Tikun-Order/Rectification") are two general stages in Jewish Kabbalah, in the order of descending spiritual worlds (Olamot).

Jewish diaspora expulsions. The 1492 Expulsion from Spain, motivated the messianic-national orientation of the Rabbinic scholars and mystics in 16th century Safed. Lurianism systemised this in its new Kabbalistic redemption scheme
Figurative origin of Igul-Circle (potential, feminine) and Yashar-Line (manifest, masculine) in creation of the spiritual Worlds
The sephirot in the scheme of Yosher-Upright, from which the partzufim develop
Lurianism sees two kinds of Nitzutzot-Sparks: Adam included all souls. His sin materialised creation and shed soul sparks
"Every descent is for a higher ascent": sin causes new Shevirah. Providential redemption transforms darkness to light, uniting Tohu and Tikun
The תקון Tikun completed by Sabbatai Zevi, printed Amsterdam, 1666. After Zevi's conversion to Islam, the Sabbatean mystical heresy soon inverted Lurianism through the "holy sin"
Hasidic trader in Iași fair, Romania, 1845. Hasidic thought emphasised the material involvement of Lurianic messianic mysticism
Hasidic stories and thought emphasise personal travels to redeem Nitzutzot sparks, linking each individual with their providential soul tasks

This new paradigm in Kabbalah replaced the previous linear description of descent with a dynamic process of spiritual enclothement, where higher "souls" invest inwardly in lower "vessels".

The grave of Isaac Luria in Safed

Isaac Luria

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Leading rabbi and Jewish mystic in the community of Safed in the Galilee region of Ottoman Syria, now Israel.

Leading rabbi and Jewish mystic in the community of Safed in the Galilee region of Ottoman Syria, now Israel.

The grave of Isaac Luria in Safed
The grave of Isaac Luria in Safed
Ark in the Ari Ashkenazi Synagogue. While Luria, the "Lion", gave the complete traditional system of Kabbalah, Maimonides, Judaism's greatest Rationalist, is called the "Great Eagle", both images taken from the Merkabah vision of Ezekiel.

Safed over the previous decades had become a center for kabbalistic studies, led by Rabbi Moses Cordovero.

Safed

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City in the Northern District of Israel.

City in the Northern District of Israel.

The Red Mosque in Safed, 2001. It was originally built by the Mamluk sultan Baybars in 1275, and renovated or expanded by the Ottomans in 1671/72
The Mamluk mausoleum of Zawiyat Banat Hamid, originally built in 1372
The Red Mosque
Hebrew book printed by Eliezer Ashkenazi in 1579
Originally built as a caravanserai by the Ottomans in the mid-1700s, the "Saraya" (house of the governor) currently serves as a community centre
Safed in the 19th century
Muslim quarter of Safed circa 1908
Melkite Greek Catholic Church in Safed
Beit Knesset Abuhav, one of the city's historic synagogues
Street art in Safed
Beit Castel gallery in the artists' colony
Scottish church in Safed
Panorama Safed and Mount Meron
View to the east and Lake of Kinneret
Safad 1937
Mandate Police station at Mount Canaan, above Safed (1948)
Safed (1948)
Safed Citadel (1948)
Safad Municipal Police Station after the battle (1948)
Bussel House, Safad, 11 April 1948: Yiftach Brigade headquarters
View of Safed from Mount Canaan (1948)
Mandate administration building on the eastern outskirts of Safed (1948)
Yiftach Brigade, with their Hotchkiss machine guns, based at Bussel House, 1948
Druze parading in Safed after the Palmach victory in 1948
Monument to the Israeli soldiers who fought in the 1948 Arab–Israeli War
Safed in 2009
View of Safed
View of Safed
Houses in Safed
Doorway in Beit Castel gallery, Safed

After the expulsion of the Jews from Spain in 1492, many prominent rabbis found their way to Safed, among them the Kabbalists Isaac Luria and Moshe Kordovero; Joseph Caro, the author of the Shulchan Aruch and Shlomo Halevi Alkabetz, composer of the Sabbath hymn "Lecha Dodi".

Hayyim ben Mair Gabbai's Pessаh Ladonai title page, Constantinople 1560

Meir ben Ezekiel ibn Gabbai

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Kabbalist born in Spain toward the end of 1480, and living probably in the East.

Kabbalist born in Spain toward the end of 1480, and living probably in the East.

Hayyim ben Mair Gabbai's Pessаh Ladonai title page, Constantinople 1560

He must be regarded, therefore, as the precursor of Moshe Cordovero and Isaac Luria.

The sefirot consist of lights invested in vessels, similar to water poured into a glass. While taking on the shape of the glass, the water is essentially unchanged.

Ein Sof

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Understood as God prior to any self-manifestation in the production of any spiritual realm, probably derived from Solomon ibn Gabirol's ( 1021 – 1070) term, "the Endless One" (she-en lo tiklah).

Understood as God prior to any self-manifestation in the production of any spiritual realm, probably derived from Solomon ibn Gabirol's ( 1021 – 1070) term, "the Endless One" (she-en lo tiklah).

The sefirot consist of lights invested in vessels, similar to water poured into a glass. While taking on the shape of the glass, the water is essentially unchanged.

Moses ben Jacob Cordovero, who gave the first full systemization of Kabbalah in the 16th century, resolved the contradiction, explaining that the sefirot consist of lights invested in vessels.

Pardes Rimonim

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Pardes Rimonim (meaning "Pardes-Orchard of Pomegranates ", sometimes known as the Pardes) is a primary text of Kabbalah, composed in 1548 by the Jewish mystic Moses ben Jacob Cordovero in Safed, Galilee.

Four Worlds

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The Four Worlds (עולמות Olamot, singular: Olam עולם), sometimes counted with a prior stage to make Five Worlds, are the comprehensive categories of spiritual realms in Kabbalah in the descending chain of Existence.

The Four Worlds (עולמות Olamot, singular: Olam עולם), sometimes counted with a prior stage to make Five Worlds, are the comprehensive categories of spiritual realms in Kabbalah in the descending chain of Existence.

The Tree of Life expanded to show each sefirot within the Four Worlds, an arrangement nicknamed "Jacob's Ladder"
Jacob's vision in Genesis 28:12 of a ladder between Heaven and Earth. In Kabbalistic interpretation, the Sulam-ladder's four main divisions are the Four Worlds and the angelic hierarchy embody external dimensions of the lights-vessels, while souls embody inner dimensions
Ezekiel's Tomb in Iraq. Ezekiel's vision of the Divine Merkabah-Chariot, and Isaiah's vision of the Kisei HaKavod-Throne of Glory, are related in Kabbalah to beholding the Four Worlds from Yetzirah, and from Beriah

The 16th-century systemisation of Kabbalah by Moshe Cordovero brought the preceding interpretations and schools into their first complete rational synthesis.

Book- Tree of life, Medieval

Tomer Devorah

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Book- Tree of life, Medieval

Tomer Devorah (Hebrew: תומר דבורה, English: The Palm Tree of Deborah) was written in Hebrew in the middle of the 16th century by Moses Cordovero, a Jewish kabbalist in Safed, Ottoman Syria.

Alkabetz's grave in Safed

Shlomo Halevi Alkabetz

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Shlomo ha-Levi Alkabetz, also spelt Alqabitz, Alqabes; (שלמה אלקבץ) (c.

Shlomo ha-Levi Alkabetz, also spelt Alqabitz, Alqabes; (שלמה אלקבץ) (c.

Alkabetz's grave in Safed

His circle included Moshe Alsheich and Yosef Karo, as well as his famous brother-in-law Moshe Cordovero.