Moshe Alshich

Moses AlshechMoses AlshichMoshe AlsheichAlshich HakadoshRabbi Mosheh Alshich
Moshe Alshich, also spelled Alshech, (1508–1593), known as the Alshich Hakadosh (the Holy), was a prominent rabbi, preacher, and biblical commentator in the latter part of the 16th century.wikipedia
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Hayyim ben Joseph Vital

Chaim VitalHayyim VitalHaim Vital
His students included Rabbi Hayim Vital and Rabbi Yom Tov Tzahalon. He was a disciple of R. Joseph Caro, author of the "Shulchan Aruch"; and his own disciples included the Kabbalist R. Hayim Vital.
Born in Safed, as a young boy Hayyim Vital was educated by the scholar Rabbi Moshe Alshich.

Yom Tov Tzahalon

Yom-Tov ZahalonYom-Ṭob ẒahalonYom-Tov ben Moses Zahalon
His students included Rabbi Hayim Vital and Rabbi Yom Tov Tzahalon.
1559 – 1638, Safed, Eyalet of Sidon), was a student of Moses di Trani and Moshe Alshich, and published a collection of responsa.

Kabbalah

KabbalistickabbalistKabbalists
Although the Alshich belonged to the circle of the Kabbalists who lived at Safed, his works rarely betray any traces of the Kabbalah.
Moshe Alshich wrote a mystical commentary on the Torah, and Shlomo Alkabetz wrote Kabbalistic commentaries and poems.

Joseph Karo

Joseph CaroYosef KaroJoseph ben Ephraim Karo
He later moved to Safed where he became a student of Rabbi Joseph Caro. He was a disciple of R. Joseph Caro, author of the "Shulchan Aruch"; and his own disciples included the Kabbalist R. Hayim Vital.
Karo was one of the first he ordained and after Berab's death, Karo tried to perpetuate the scheme by ordaining his pupil Moshe Alshich, but he finally gave up his endeavors, convinced that he could not overcome the opposition to ordination.

Rabbi

rabbisOrthodox Rabbimara d'atra
Moshe Alshich, also spelled Alshech, (1508–1593), known as the Alshich Hakadosh (the Holy), was a prominent rabbi, preacher, and biblical commentator in the latter part of the 16th century.

Bible

biblicalThe BibleChristian Bible
Moshe Alshich, also spelled Alshech, (1508–1593), known as the Alshich Hakadosh (the Holy), was a prominent rabbi, preacher, and biblical commentator in the latter part of the 16th century.

Ottoman Empire

OttomanOttomansTurks
The Alshich was born in 1508 in the Ottoman Empire, and was the son of Hayyim Alshich.

Isaiah Horowitz

Shelah HaKadoshIsaiah HurwitzShelah
Alongside the Alshich were the Shelah HaKadosh, the Ari HaKadosh and the Ohr HaChaim HaKadosh, all of them distinctive personalities in their times.

Chaim ibn Attar

Haim ibn AttarOhr ha-ChaimOhr Hachaim
Alongside the Alshich were the Shelah HaKadosh, the Ari HaKadosh and the Ohr HaChaim HaKadosh, all of them distinctive personalities in their times.

Homiletics

homiletichomileticalhomiletically
His homiletical commentaries on the Torah and the Prophets enjoy much popularity and are still studied today, largely because of their powerful influence as practical exhortations to virtuous life.

Nevi'im

Books of the ProphetsProphetsBook of the Prophets
His homiletical commentaries on the Torah and the Prophets enjoy much popularity and are still studied today, largely because of their powerful influence as practical exhortations to virtuous life.

Shulchan Aruch

Shulkhan ArukhShulchan ArukhShulhan Arukh
He was a disciple of R. Joseph Caro, author of the "Shulchan Aruch"; and his own disciples included the Kabbalist R. Hayim Vital.

Isaac Luria

ArizalLurianicLurianic Kabbalah
Alongside the Alshich were the Shelah HaKadosh, the Ari HaKadosh and the Ohr HaChaim HaKadosh, all of them distinctive personalities in their times.

Isaac Abarbanel

Isaac AbravanelIsaac AbrabanelDon Isaac Abravanel
Like Abravanel and some other commentators, Alshich headed each section of his comments with a number of questions which he anticipated on the part of the reader; he then proceeded to give a summary of his view, and concluded with answering all the questions seriatim.

Talmud

Babylonian TalmudTalmudicTalmudist
His Commentaries abound in references to Talmud, Midrash and Zohar, but contain scant references to other commentaries, such as the works of Abravanel, Gersonides or Maimonides.

Midrash

MidrashimMidrashicMidrash Rabbah
His Commentaries abound in references to Talmud, Midrash and Zohar, but contain scant references to other commentaries, such as the works of Abravanel, Gersonides or Maimonides.

Zohar

The ZoharinterpretationBook of Radiance
His Commentaries abound in references to Talmud, Midrash and Zohar, but contain scant references to other commentaries, such as the works of Abravanel, Gersonides or Maimonides.

Gersonides

Levi ben GershonLevi ben GersonLevi ben Gershom
His Commentaries abound in references to Talmud, Midrash and Zohar, but contain scant references to other commentaries, such as the works of Abravanel, Gersonides or Maimonides.

Maimonides

RambamMoses MaimonidesMaimonidean
His Commentaries abound in references to Talmud, Midrash and Zohar, but contain scant references to other commentaries, such as the works of Abravanel, Gersonides or Maimonides.

Song of Songs

Song of SolomonThe Song of SongsShir Hashirim
In his commentary on the Song of Solomon, he calls peshaִt (literal explanation) and sod (mystical interpretation) the two opposite extremes, while he declares his own method of introducing allegorical exposition to be the safe mean between these extremes.

Torah

PentateuchLawWritten Torah
His homiletical commentaries on the Torah and the Prophets enjoy much popularity and are still studied today, largely because of their powerful influence as practical exhortations to virtuous life.

Book of Lamentations

LamentationsLamentations of JeremiahEicha