Motion

movementMotion (physics)locomotionmotionsmobilityimmobilemovesmovingmechanical motionMobile
In physics, motion is the change in the position of an object over time.wikipedia
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Physics

physicistphysicalphysicists
In physics, motion is the change in the position of an object over time.
Physics (from, from φύσις phýsis 'nature') is the natural science that studies matter, its motion and behavior through space and time, and that studies the related entities of energy and force.

Mass

inertial massgravitational massweight
An object's momentum increases with the object's mass and with its velocity.
Mass is both a property of a physical body and a measure of its resistance to acceleration (a change in its state of motion) when a net force is applied.

Velocity

velocitiesvelocity vectorlinear velocity
Motion is mathematically described in terms of displacement, distance, velocity, acceleration, speed, and time.
Velocity is equivalent to a specification of an object's speed and direction of motion (e.g. 60 km/h to the north).

Classical mechanics

Newtonian mechanicsNewtonian physicsclassical
Motions of all large-scale and familiar objects in the universe (such as cars, projectiles, planets, cells, and humans) are described by classical mechanics, whereas the motion of very small atomic and sub-atomic objects is described by quantum mechanics.
Classical mechanics describes the motion of macroscopic objects, from projectiles to parts of machinery, and astronomical objects, such as spacecraft, planets, stars and galaxies.

Force

forcesattractiveelastic force
An object's motion, and thus its momentum, cannot change unless a force acts on the object.
In physics, a force is any interaction that, when unopposed, will change the motion of an object.

Newton's laws of motion

Newton's second lawNewton's third lawNewton's second law of motion
The larger scales of imperceptible motions are difficult for humans to perceive for two reasons: Newton's laws of motion (particularly the third) which prevents the feeling of motion on a mass to which the observer is connected, and the lack of an obvious frame of reference which would allow individuals to easily see that they are moving.
They describe the relationship between a body and the forces acting upon it, and its motion in response to those forces.

Distance

distancesproximitydepth
Motion is mathematically described in terms of displacement, distance, velocity, acceleration, speed, and time.
This implies motion of the particle.

Science

scientificsciencesscientific knowledge
It produces very accurate results within these domains, and is one of the oldest and largest in science, engineering, and technology.
Calculus, for example, was initially invented to understand motion in physics.

Spacetime

space-timespace-time continuumspace and time
Spacetime (the fabric of the universe) is expanding meaning everything in the universe is stretching like a rubber band.
Classical mechanics assumes that time has a constant rate of passage, independent of the observer's state of motion, or anything external.

Kinetic energy

kinetickinetic energiesenergy
This motion can be detected as temperature; higher temperatures, which represent greater kinetic energy in the particles, feel warm to humans who sense the thermal energy transferring from the object being touched to their nerves.
In physics, the kinetic energy (KE) of an object is the energy that it possesses due to its motion.

Trajectory

trajectoriesflightpathflight path
A trajectory or flight path is the path that an object with mass in motion follows through space as a function of time.

Reciprocating motion

reciprocatingReciprocal motionreciprocated
Reciprocating motion, also called reciprocation, is a repetitive up-and-down or back-and-forth linear motion.

Rolling

rollRolling motion rolling thread
Rolling is a type of motion that combines rotation (commonly, of an axially symmetric object) and translation of that object with respect to a surface (either one or the other moves), such that, if ideal conditions exist, the two are in contact with each other without sliding.

Projectile motion

ballistic trajectorylofted trajectoryballistic
Projectile motion is a form of motion experienced by an object or particle (a projectile) that is thrown near the Earth's surface and moves along a curved path under the action of gravity only (in particular, the effects of air resistance are assumed to be negligible).

Angular momentum

conservation of angular momentumangular momentamomentum
Inside the atomic nucleus, the protons and neutrons are also probably moving around due to the electrical repulsion of the protons and the presence of angular momentum of both particles.
By retaining this vector nature of angular momentum, the general nature of the equations is also retained, and can describe any sort of three-dimensional motion about the center of rotation – circular, linear, or otherwise.

Linear motion

straight-line motionlinearrectilinear motion
Linear motion (also called rectilinear motion ) is a one-dimensional motion along a straight line, and can therefore be described mathematically using only one spatial dimension.

Motion perception

motionaperture problemMotion sensing in vision
Humans, like all known things in the universe, are in constant motion; however, aside from obvious movements of the various external body parts and locomotion, humans are in motion in a variety of ways which are more difficult to perceive.

Matter

corporealsubstancematerial
These descriptions include the simultaneous wave-like and particle-like behavior of both matter and radiation energy as described in the wave–particle duality.

Human body

bodyhuman anatomyhuman physiology
The cells of the human body have many structures which move throughout them.
The CNS is mostly responsible for organizing motion, processing sensory information, thought, memory, cognition and other such functions.

Motion (geometry)

motiongroup of motionsa group of motions
The science of kinematics is dedicated to rendering physical motion into expression as mathematical transformation.

Time

temporaldurationsequence of events
In physics, motion is the change in the position of an object over time. Motion is mathematically described in terms of displacement, distance, velocity, acceleration, speed, and time.

Euclidean group

direct isometriesEuclidean motionrigid motion
Motion is mathematically described in terms of displacement, distance, velocity, acceleration, speed, and time.

Acceleration

decelerationacceleratem/s 2
Motion is mathematically described in terms of displacement, distance, velocity, acceleration, speed, and time.

Speed

tangential velocityaverage speedtangential speed
Motion is mathematically described in terms of displacement, distance, velocity, acceleration, speed, and time.

Frame of reference

reference frameframes of referencereference frames
The larger scales of imperceptible motions are difficult for humans to perceive for two reasons: Newton's laws of motion (particularly the third) which prevents the feeling of motion on a mass to which the observer is connected, and the lack of an obvious frame of reference which would allow individuals to easily see that they are moving. The motion of a body is observed by attaching a frame of reference to an observer and measuring the change in position of the body relative to that frame.