Motion Picture Association of America

MPAAMotion Picture Producers and Distributors of AmericaMotion Picture AssociationMPPDAMotion Picture Producers and Distributors AssociationMotion Picture Association of America (MPAA)MPAThe Motion Picture Association of AmericaMotion Pictures Producers and Distributors of AmericaNC-17
The Motion Picture Association (MPA) is an American trade association representing the five major film studios of the United States, as well as the video streaming service Netflix.wikipedia
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Netflix

Netflix UKNetflix OriginalNetflix Series
The Motion Picture Association (MPA) is an American trade association representing the five major film studios of the United States, as well as the video streaming service Netflix. In June 2017, the MPAA supported the launch of the Alliance for Creativity and Entertainment (ACE), a coalition of entertainment companies, including the six major studios, Netflix and Amazon, that would draw on the MPAA's resources in an effort to reduce online piracy through research and legal efforts.
Netflix is a member of the Motion Picture Association (MPA).

Motion Picture Production Code

Production CodeHays CodeHays Office
In addition, the MPAA established guidelines for film content which resulted in the creation of the Production Code in 1930.
Under Hays' leadership, the MPPDA, later known as the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), adopted the Production Code in 1930 and began rigidly enforcing it in mid-1934.

Charles Rivkin

Charles H. RivkinCharles
Former United States Ambassador to France Charles Rivkin is the chairman and CEO.
Charles Hammerman Rivkin (born April 6, 1962) is an American media executive and former United States diplomat who is Chairman and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the Motion Picture Association (MPA).

Will H. Hays

Will HaysHaysWilliam Hays
Former Postmaster General Will H. Hays was named the association's first president.
William Harrison Hays Sr. (November 5, 1879 – March 7, 1954) was a United States politician, chairman of the Republican National Committee (1918–21), U.S. Postmaster General (1921–22), and, from 1922–1945, the first chairman of the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America (MPPDA).

Joseph Breen

Joseph I. BreenBreen OfficeBreen
In order to avert boycotts which might further harm the profitability of the film industry, the MPPDA created a new department, the Production Code Administration (PCA), with Joseph Breen as its head.
Joseph Ignatius Breen (October 14, 1888 – December 5, 1965) was an American film censor with the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America who applied the Hays Code to film production.

Eric Johnston

Johnston office
In 1945 the MPPDA hired Eric Johnston, four-time president of the United States Chamber of Commerce, to replace Hays.
Eric Allen Johnston (December 21, 1896 – August 22, 1963) was a business owner, president of the United States Chamber of Commerce, a Republican Party activist, president of the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), and a U.S. government special projects administrator and envoy for both Democratic and Republican administrations.

Jack Valenti

Jack J. ValentiJack Valente
The MPAA appointed Jack Valenti, former aide to President Lyndon Johnson, as president of the MPAA in 1966.
Jack Joseph Valenti (September 5, 1921 – April 26, 2007) was a Special Assistant to U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson and the longtime president of the Motion Picture Association of America.

Cinema of the United States

HollywoodAmericanHollywood films
Founded in 1922 as the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America (MPPDA) and known as the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) from 1945 until September 2019, its original goal was to ensure the viability of the American film industry.
The organization became the Motion Picture Association of America after Hays retired in 1945.

Trade association

trade organizationindustry trade grouptrade associations
The Motion Picture Association (MPA) is an American trade association representing the five major film studios of the United States, as well as the video streaming service Netflix.
For example, in the US in the early 2000s the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) began running advertisements before films that advocate against movie piracy over the Internet.

Dan Glickman

Daniel GlickmanDan R. GlickmanSecretary Glickman
In September of that year, he was replaced by former Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman.
He was Chairman and CEO of the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) from 2004–2010.

Production Code Administration

PCAproduction codeProduction Code of 1934
In order to avert boycotts which might further harm the profitability of the film industry, the MPPDA created a new department, the Production Code Administration (PCA), with Joseph Breen as its head.
The Production Code Administration (PCA) was established by the Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America (MPPDA) in 1934 to enforce the Motion Picture Production Code.

This Film Is Not Yet Rated

This [Film] Is Not Yet RatedThis Film Is No Yet Rated
In 2006 the film This Film Is Not Yet Rated alleged that the MPAA gave preferential treatment to member studios during the process of assigning ratings, as well as criticizing the rating process for its lack of transparency.
This Film Is Not Yet Rated is a 2006 American documentary film about the Motion Picture Association of America's rating system and its effect on American culture, directed by Kirby Dick and produced by Eddie Schmidt.

Chris Dodd

Christopher DoddChristopher J. DoddDodd
After a search which lasted over a year, the MPAA hired former U.S. Senator Chris Dodd to replace Glickman in March 2011.
Dodd then served as chairman and chief lobbyist for the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) during 2011–2017.

Stop Online Piracy Act

SOPAStop Online Piracy Act (SOPA)HR 3261
In 2011, the MPAA supported the passage of the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and PROTECT IP Act (PIPA).
Supporters include the Motion Picture Association of America, pharmaceuticals makers, media businesses, and the United States Chamber of Commerce.

Warner Bros.

Warner BrothersWarner Bros. PicturesWarner Bros
The original members of the MPAA were the "Big Eight" film studios: Paramount Pictures, 20th Century Fox, Loews, Universal Pictures, Warner Bros., Columbia Pictures, United Artists and RKO Pictures.
Founded in 1923, it has operations in areas such as film, television, and video games and is one of the "Big Five" major American film studios, as well as a member of the Motion Picture Association (MPA).

Universal Pictures

Universal StudiosUniversalUniversal Film Manufacturing Company
The original members of the MPAA were the "Big Eight" film studios: Paramount Pictures, 20th Century Fox, Loews, Universal Pictures, Warner Bros., Columbia Pictures, United Artists and RKO Pictures.
Universal Pictures is a member of the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA), and was one of the "Little Three" majors during Hollywood's golden age.

PROTECT IP Act

PIPAProtect Intellectual Property ActPROTECT IP
In 2011, the MPAA supported the passage of the Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA) and PROTECT IP Act (PIPA).
Supporters include the National Cable & Telecommunications Association, the Independent Film & Television Alliance, the National Association of Theatre Owners, the Motion Picture Association of America, the Directors Guild of America, the American Federation of Musicians, the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, the Screen Actors Guild, International Brotherhood of Teamsters, Nashville Songwriters Association International, Songwriters Guild of America, Viacom, Institute for Policy Innovation, Macmillan Publishers, Acushnet Company, Recording Industry Association of America, Copyright Alliance and NBCUniversal.

Alliance for Creativity and Entertainment

In June 2017, the MPAA supported the launch of the Alliance for Creativity and Entertainment (ACE), a coalition of entertainment companies, including the six major studios, Netflix and Amazon, that would draw on the MPAA's resources in an effort to reduce online piracy through research and legal efforts.
The stated mission of ACE is to protect profits, drawing on the anti-piracy resources of the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA).

Walt Disney Studios (division)

Walt Disney StudiosThe Walt Disney StudiosDisney
In the following decade, new members joining the MPAA included Avco Embassy in 1975 and Walt Disney Studios in 1979.
The Walt Disney Studios is a member of the Motion Picture Association (MPA).

Paramount Pictures

ParamountParamount StudiosParamount British Pictures
The original members of the MPAA were the "Big Eight" film studios: Paramount Pictures, 20th Century Fox, Loews, Universal Pictures, Warner Bros., Columbia Pictures, United Artists and RKO Pictures.
Paramount Pictures is a member of the Motion Picture Association (MPA).

Sony Pictures

Sony Pictures EntertainmentSonyColumbia Tristar
As of 1995, the MPAA members were MGM—which included United Artists after their 1981 merger, Paramount Pictures, Sony Pictures—which included Columbia and TriStar Pictures after their acquisition in 1989, 20th Century Fox, Universal Studios, Walt Disney Studios, and Warner Bros.
SPE is a member of the Big Five and the Motion Picture Association (MPA).

National Legion of Decency

Legion of DecencyCatholic Legion of DecencyCatholic League of Decency
In 1933 and 1934 the Catholic Legion of Decency, along with a number of Protestant and women's groups, launched plans to boycott films that they deemed immoral.
The Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America created a section of general principles that mostly fell in the realm of moral standards, correct standards of life, and standards of human law not be violated whatsoever.

United Artists

UAUnited Artists ReleasingUnited Artists Corporation
The original members of the MPAA were the "Big Eight" film studios: Paramount Pictures, 20th Century Fox, Loews, Universal Pictures, Warner Bros., Columbia Pictures, United Artists and RKO Pictures.
However, Transamerica was not pleased with UA's releases such as Midnight Cowboy and Last Tango in Paris that were rated X by the Motion Picture Association of America.

You can click, but you can't hide

Its counterpart has come up with infamous slogans such as "Who Makes Movies?" and "You can click, but you can't hide."
You can click, but you can't hide is a propaganda campaign run jointly by several international associations, most notably the MPA, the MPAA, and the GVU, as part of the larger "Respect Copyrights" campaign against peer-to-peer file sharing of motion pictures.

Lucky and Flo

The MPA and its British counterpart, the Federation Against Copyright Theft (FACT), also funded the training of Lucky and Flo, a pair of Labrador Retrievers, to detect polycarbonates used in the manufacturing of DVDs.
They are sponsored by the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) and Federation Against Copyright Theft (FACT) as part of an initiative to combat copyright infringement of film DVDs.