Mount Cayley volcanic field

The Mount Cayley volcanic field is a remote volcanic zone on the South Coast of British Columbia, Canada, stretching 31 km from the Pemberton Icefield to the Squamish River.wikipedia
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Volcanic field

volcanic fieldscaldera complexesvolcanic area
This icefield covers much of the central portion of the volcanic field and is one of the several glacial fields in the Pacific Ranges of the Coast Mountains.

Slag Hill

Lying in the middle of the Mount Cayley volcanic field is a subglacial volcano named Slag Hill.
Slag Hill is a subglacial volcano associated with the Mount Cayley volcanic field in British Columbia, Canada.

Powder Mountain Icefield

The field gets its name from Mount Cayley, the largest and most persistent volcano, located at the southern end of the Powder Mountain Icefield.
Numerous subglacial eruptions beneath the Powder Mountain Icefield have formed many distinctive subglacial volcanoes in the Mount Cayley volcanic field and contain abundant glass and fine-scale jointing from rapid cooling of lava, such as Ember Ridge and Slag Hill.

Ember Ridge

Ember Ridge, a mountain ridge between Tricouni Peak and Mount Fee, consists of at least eight lava domes composed of andesite.
Ember Ridge is a volcanic mountain ridge associated with the Mount Cayley volcanic field in British Columbia, Canada.

Ring Mountain (British Columbia)

Ring MountainCrucible Dome
Ring Mountain, a flow-dominated tuya lying at the northern portion of the Mount Cayley volcanic field, consists of a pile of at least five andesite lava flows lying on a mountain ridge.
Ring Mountain, also called Crucible Dome, is a tuya in the Mount Cayley volcanic field, British Columbia, Canada.

Cauldron Dome

Cauldron Dome, a subglacial volcano north of Mount Cayley, lies west of the Powder Mountain Icefield.
Cauldron Dome is a tuya in the Mount Cayley volcanic field, British Columbia, Canada.

Mount Fee

Immediately southeast of Mount Cayley lies Mount Fee, an extensively eroded volcano containing a north-south trending ridge.
Mount Fee is one of the southernmost volcanoes in the Mount Cayley volcanic field.

Squamish River

SquamishSquamish Valley
The Mount Cayley volcanic field is a remote volcanic zone on the South Coast of British Columbia, Canada, stretching 31 km from the Pemberton Icefield to the Squamish River.

Tricouni Southwest

One of these sequences, known as Tricouni Southwest, creates a cliff on the eastern side of a north-south trending channel with a depth of 200 m adjacent to the High Falls Creek mouth.
Tricouni Southwest is a basaltic andesite lava flow in the Mount Cayley volcanic field of the Garibaldi Volcanic Belt in southwestern British Columbia, Canada, located south of Tricouni Peak.

Little Ring Mountain

To the north lies Little Ring Mountain, another flow-dominated tuya lying at the northern portion of the Mount Cayley volcanic field.
Part of the Mount Cayley volcanic field, its most recent eruption most likely occurred during the Fraser Glaciation.

Mount Brew (Cheakamus River)

Mount Brew
Mount Brew, 18 km southwest of the resort town of Whistler, is a 1757 m high lava dome composed of andesite or dacite that probably formed subglacially between 25,000 and 10,000 years ago.
Mount Brew is a volcanic feature in the Mount Cayley volcanic field of the central Garibaldi Volcanic Belt of the Canadian Cascade Arc.

Pali Dome

Pali Dome, located north and northeast of Mount Cayley, is an eroded volcano in the central Mount Cayley volcanic field.
It is part of the Mount Cayley volcanic field and its elevation is 2250 m. For the past 2 million years, the Mount Cayley volcanic field has had interactions between ice and lava which have created some unique landforms and an in-ice drainage system.

Cheakamus River

CheakamusCheakamus CanyonCheakamus Valley
Exposed along the Cheakamus River and its tributaries are the Cheakamus Valley basalts.

Jack Souther

Jack G. SoutherSouther
Several volcanic features in the Mount Cayley field were illustrated by volcanologist Jack Souther in 1980, including Mount Cayley, Cauldron Dome, Slag Hill, Mount Fee, Ember Ridge and Ring Mountain, which was titled Crucible Dome at the time.
Several features in the Mount Cayley volcanic field were illustrated by Jack Souther in 1980, including Mount Cayley, Ember Ridge, Mount Fee, Cauldron Dome, Pali Dome, Slag Hill and Ring Mountain, the later of which he called Crucible Dome.

Mount Cayley massif

CayleyMount CayleyMount Cayley Hot Springs
The massif resides in the middle of a north–south trending zone of volcanism called the Mount Cayley volcanic field.

British Columbia Coast

Central Coast of British ColumbiaCentral Coast regionNorth Coast of British Columbia
The Mount Cayley volcanic field is a remote volcanic zone on the South Coast of British Columbia, Canada, stretching 31 km from the Pemberton Icefield to the Squamish River.

British Columbia

BCBritish Columbia, CanadaB.C.
The Mount Cayley volcanic field is a remote volcanic zone on the South Coast of British Columbia, Canada, stretching 31 km from the Pemberton Icefield to the Squamish River.

Canada

CanadianCANCanadians
The Mount Cayley volcanic field is a remote volcanic zone on the South Coast of British Columbia, Canada, stretching 31 km from the Pemberton Icefield to the Squamish River.

Pemberton Icefield

Pemberton Icecap
The Mount Cayley volcanic field is a remote volcanic zone on the South Coast of British Columbia, Canada, stretching 31 km from the Pemberton Icefield to the Squamish River.

Garibaldi Volcanic Belt

GaribaldiCascade Volcanic ArcGaribaldi Volcanic Arc
It forms a segment of the Garibaldi Volcanic Belt, the Canadian portion of the Cascade Volcanic Arc, which extends from Northern California to southwestern British Columbia.

Cascade Volcanoes

Cascade Volcanic ArcCascadeCascade Arc
It forms a segment of the Garibaldi Volcanic Belt, the Canadian portion of the Cascade Volcanic Arc, which extends from Northern California to southwestern British Columbia.

Northern California

NorthernNorth CaliforniaNorCal
It forms a segment of the Garibaldi Volcanic Belt, the Canadian portion of the Cascade Volcanic Arc, which extends from Northern California to southwestern British Columbia.

Volcanism

volcanicvolcanic activityvulcanism
Most of the Cayley volcanoes were formed during periods of volcanism under sheets of glacial ice throughout the last glacial period.