Mount John Laurie

John LaurieYamnuska
Mount John Laurie is a mountain in the Canadian Rockies, located in the province of Alberta, Canada.wikipedia
30 Related Articles

Mountain

mountainsmountainouspeak
Mount John Laurie is a mountain in the Canadian Rockies, located in the province of Alberta, Canada.

Canadian Rockies

Rocky MountainsRockiesCanadian Rocky Mountains
Mount John Laurie is a mountain in the Canadian Rockies, located in the province of Alberta, Canada.

Alberta

ABAlberta, CanadaALB
Mount John Laurie is a mountain in the Canadian Rockies, located in the province of Alberta, Canada.

Canada

🇨🇦CanadianCAN
Mount John Laurie is a mountain in the Canadian Rockies, located in the province of Alberta, Canada.

Stoney language

StoneyNakodaNakoda (Stoney) language
Officially named Mount John Laurie in 1961, it is also known as Mount Laurie, or by the Nakoda name Mount Yamnuska, or simply Yamnuska.

Indian Association of Alberta

John Lee Laurie, 1899–1959, was a founder of the Indian Association of Alberta.

Bow River

BowBow River valleyBow Rive
Standing at approximately above sea level, Mount John Laurie is the first mountain on the north side of the Bow River valley (Bow Valley) as it exits the mountains for the foothills and prairie of Alberta.

Bow Valley

Bow Corridor
Standing at approximately above sea level, Mount John Laurie is the first mountain on the north side of the Bow River valley (Bow Valley) as it exits the mountains for the foothills and prairie of Alberta.

Calgary

Calgary, AlbertaCalgary, ABCalgary, Alberta, Canada
Located close to Calgary, it is a popular "great scramble".

Rock climbing

rock climberrock climbersrock-climbing
It is also a popular rock climbing destination, with over 100 routes of all difficulty levels spread out across its face.

Cambrian

Cambrian periodCambroLower Cambrian
Mount John Laurie is the result of the McConnell Thrust Fault, which put the resistive, cliff forming Cambrian carbonate rock of the Eldon Formation on top of the much younger and weaker Cretaceous aged, clastic Belly River Formation The fault, which sits at the base of the cliff face, represents an age difference of around 450 million years.

Carbonate rock

carbonatecarbonatescarbonate rocks
Mount John Laurie is the result of the McConnell Thrust Fault, which put the resistive, cliff forming Cambrian carbonate rock of the Eldon Formation on top of the much younger and weaker Cretaceous aged, clastic Belly River Formation The fault, which sits at the base of the cliff face, represents an age difference of around 450 million years.

Cretaceous

Cretaceous PeriodEarly CretaceousLate Cretaceous
Mount John Laurie is the result of the McConnell Thrust Fault, which put the resistive, cliff forming Cambrian carbonate rock of the Eldon Formation on top of the much younger and weaker Cretaceous aged, clastic Belly River Formation The fault, which sits at the base of the cliff face, represents an age difference of around 450 million years.

Clastic rock

clasticclastclasts
Mount John Laurie is the result of the McConnell Thrust Fault, which put the resistive, cliff forming Cambrian carbonate rock of the Eldon Formation on top of the much younger and weaker Cretaceous aged, clastic Belly River Formation The fault, which sits at the base of the cliff face, represents an age difference of around 450 million years.

Belly River Group

Mount John Laurie is the result of the McConnell Thrust Fault, which put the resistive, cliff forming Cambrian carbonate rock of the Eldon Formation on top of the much younger and weaker Cretaceous aged, clastic Belly River Formation The fault, which sits at the base of the cliff face, represents an age difference of around 450 million years.

Paleozoic

PalaeozoicPaleozoic eraLate Paleozoic

Scrambling

Yamnuska Mountain Adventures

The company was named after Mount Yamnuska, a native name (Stoney) that translates to "flat-faced mountain".

List of mountains of Canada

Mountains of QuebecMountains in CanadaMountains of British Columbia
Mount John Laurie (Mount Yamnuska)

Bow Valley Provincial Park

A much larger area, the Bow Valley Wildland Provincial Park contains the 575 km 2 Yamnuska Natural Area that protects the sub-alpine ecosystem present in the Canadian Rockies foothills, between the Kananaskis park system and the Banff National Park, which it borders to the west.

Seebe, Alberta

Seebe
Seebe has great vistas of the imposing face of Yamnuska Mountain to the north, Pigeon Mountain and the Kananaskis Valley to the south, Loder Peak and the Bow Valley to the west, and opening onto the prairie grasslands and the Bow Valley to the east.

Kayak Bill

1971 Wakonda Buttress of Yamnuska, Kananaskis, AB, Canada.