Mount Vernon

Mt. VernonMount Vernon PlantationMount Vernon EstateVirginia homeEpsewassonGeorge Washington's home on Mount VernonGeorge Washington's Mount VernonMount Vernon Burial GroundMount Vernon, Virginiatheir reverence for George Washington
Mount Vernon was the plantation of George Washington, the first President of the United States, and his wife, Martha Dandridge Custis Washington.wikipedia
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George Washington

WashingtonGeneral WashingtonPresident Washington
Mount Vernon was the plantation of George Washington, the first President of the United States, and his wife, Martha Dandridge Custis Washington. When George Washington's ancestors acquired the estate, it was known as Little Hunting Creek Plantation, after the nearby Little Hunting Creek.
When he was three, the family moved from Popes Creek plantation to the Epsewasson plantation on the Potomac River.

Plantation complexes in the Southern United States

plantation housemansionmain house
Mount Vernon was the plantation of George Washington, the first President of the United States, and his wife, Martha Dandridge Custis Washington.
Several plantation homes of important persons, including Mount Vernon, Monticello, and The Hermitage have also been preserved.

Alexandria, Virginia

AlexandriaAlexandria, VAAlexandria City
The estate is situated on the banks of the Potomac River in Fairfax County, Virginia, near Alexandria, across from Prince George's County, Maryland.
In March 1785, commissioners from Virginia and Maryland met in Alexandria to discuss the commercial relations of the two states, finishing their business at Mount Vernon.

Mount Vernon Ladies' Association

Mount Vernon Ladies AssociationMount Vernon Ladies’ AssociationMt. Vernon Ladies' Association
In 1858, the house's historical importance was recognized and it was saved from ruin by the Mount Vernon Ladies' Association; this philanthropic organization acquired it together with part of the Washington property estate.
The Mount Vernon Ladies' Association is a non-profit organization that preserves and maintains the Mount Vernon estate originally owned by George Washington and family.

Martha Washington

MarthaMartha Dandridge CustisMartha Dandridge Custis Washington
Mount Vernon was the plantation of George Washington, the first President of the United States, and his wife, Martha Dandridge Custis Washington.
The couple honeymooned at the White House for several weeks before setting up house at Washington's Mount Vernon estate.

Lawrence Washington (1718–1752)

Lawrence WashingtonLawrenceLawrence Washington)
However, when Washington's older half-brother, Lawrence Washington, inherited it, he changed its name to Mount Vernon in honor of Vice Admiral Edward Vernon, famed for the War of Jenkins' Ear and capture of the Portobelo, Colón.
He was the first of the family to live in the Mount Vernon estate, which he named after his commanding officer in the War of Jenkins' Ear, Admiral Edward Vernon.

Little Hunting Creek

When George Washington's ancestors acquired the estate, it was known as Little Hunting Creek Plantation, after the nearby Little Hunting Creek.
The Washington family built its Mount Vernon plantation on the Potomac River along both banks of Little Hunting Creek during colonial times.

Augustine Washington

Augustine
The mansion was built of wood in a loose Palladian style; the original house was built by George Washington's father Augustine, around 1734.
Lawrence inherited the Little Hunting Creek property and renamed his property Mount Vernon, in honor of Admiral Edward Vernon, with whom he had served in the British Navy in 1741 during the Battle of Cartagena de Indias during the War of Jenkins' Ear.

Nicholas Spencer

Col. Nicholas SpencerCol. Nicholas Spencer Jr.Spencer
In 1674, John Washington (the great-grandfather of President Washington) and his friend Nicholas Spencer came into possession of the land from which Mount Vernon plantation would be carved, originally known by its Indian name of Epsewasson.
Spencer's role as agent for the Culpepers helped him and his friend Lt. Col. John Washington, ancestor of George Washington, secure the patent for their joint land grant of the Mount Vernon estate.

Fairfax County, Virginia

Fairfax CountyFairfax Fairfax County, Virginia
The estate is situated on the banks of the Potomac River in Fairfax County, Virginia, near Alexandria, across from Prince George's County, Maryland. Though no architect is known to have designed Mount Vernon, some attribute the design to John Ariss (1725–1799), a prominent Virginia architect who designed Paynes Church in Fairfax County (now destroyed) and likely Mount Airy in Richmond County.
George Washington settled in Fairfax County and built his home, Mount Vernon, facing the river.

Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington

The Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George WashingtonFred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington at Mount Vernon
The Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington opened in September 2013.
Located at Washington's home in Mount Vernon, Virginia, the library was built by the Mount Vernon Ladies' Association and is privately funded.

Bushrod Washington

Justice WashingtonWashingtonGeorge Washington
Blackburn's granddaughter Anne married Bushrod Washington, George's nephew, and is interred at the Washingtons' tomb on the grounds.
The nephew of American founding father and President George Washington, he inherited his uncle's papers and Mount Vernon, taking possession in 1802 after the death of Martha Washington, his uncle's widow.

Edward Vernon

Admiral VernonVernonAdmiral Edward Vernon
However, when Washington's older half-brother, Lawrence Washington, inherited it, he changed its name to Mount Vernon in honor of Vice Admiral Edward Vernon, famed for the War of Jenkins' Ear and capture of the Portobelo, Colón.
He named his Virginia estate Mount Vernon in honour of his former commander, a name retained by George Washington.

Attempted theft of George Washington's skull

attempted to steal
The need for a new tomb was confirmed when an unsuccessful attempt was made to steal his skull (See: Attempted theft of George Washington's head).
In 1830, an attempt was made to steal the skull from the remains of George Washington, which resided in a tomb at Mount Vernon.

Lawrence Washington (1659–1698)

Lawrence WashingtonLawrence
When John Washington died in 1677, his son Lawrence, George Washington's grandfather, inherited his father's stake in the property.
Upon the death of his father, Washington inherited two substantial estates on the Potomac River: Mattox Creek (1,850 acres) and Little Hunting Creek (2,500 acres) (which would eventually be renamed Mount Vernon by Lawrence's grandson and namesake, Lawrence Washington).

Samuel Vaughan

Samuel Frier Vaughan
When it was donated to Washington by the English merchant Samuel Vaughan, Washington was initially reluctant to accept the gift, stating that it was: "too elegant & costly I fear for my own room, & republican stile of living."
In 1787 also, Vaughan visited Mount Vernon, and drew a plan of the garden.

John Ariss

Though no architect is known to have designed Mount Vernon, some attribute the design to John Ariss (1725–1799), a prominent Virginia architect who designed Paynes Church in Fairfax County (now destroyed) and likely Mount Airy in Richmond County.
Some also believe that Ariss had a role in designing the Washington home at Mount Vernon.

Harrison Howell Dodge

Harrison Howell Dodge became the third resident superintendent in 1885.
Harrison Howell Dodge (March 31, 1852 – May 20, 1937) was the third resident superintendent of George Washington's estate at Mount Vernon.

George Washington's Gristmill

flour millingGeorge Washington DistilleryGeorge Washington's distillery
On 30 March 2007, the estate officially opened a reconstruction of George Washington's distillery.
George Washington's Gristmill was part of the original Mount Vernon plantation, constructed during the lifetime of the United States' first president.

Colonial Revival garden

Colonial RevivalColonial Revival styleformal colonial gardens
These Colonial Revival gardens grew the household's vegetables, fruit and other perishable items for consumption.
Mount Vernon, plantation home of George Washington located near Alexandria, Virginia

Charles Wall

Charles Wall was assistant superintendent from 1929 to 1937, then resident superintendent for 39 years.
Charles Cecil Wall (June 21, 1903 – May 1, 1995) was an American self-taught historian and preservationist, who spent nearly 40 years as resident director of George Washington's estate at Mount Vernon on the banks of the Potomac River, where he endeavored to keep the home and its surroundings in much the same state that it existed when the First President resided there.

American Whiskey Trail

Frank Coleman, spokesman for the Distilled Spirits Council that funded the reconstruction, said the distillery "will become the equivalent of a national distillery museum" and serve as a gateway to the American Whiskey Trail.
George Washington Distillery Museum in Mount Vernon, Virginia

Mount Vernon Mansion replicas

* Mount Vernon Mansion replicas
Mount Vernon Mansion replicas are faithful copies or buildings inspired by Mount Vernon, the mansion of U.S. President George Washington in Fairfax County, Virginia, United States.

American Presidents: Life Portraits

American Presidents
"Life Portrait of George Washington", from C-SPAN's American Presidents: Life Portraits, broadcast from Mount Vernon, 15 March 1999

United States Capitol

CapitolU.S. CapitolCapitol Building
Congress passed a joint resolution to construct a marble monument in the United States Capitol for his body, an initiative supported by Martha.
However, under the stipulations of his last will, Washington was buried at Mount Vernon.