Mouth

oral cavityoralorallyperioralbuccalmouth cavitybuccal cavityintraoralmawbuccal region
In animal anatomy, the mouth, also known as the oral cavity, buccal cavity, or in Latin cavum oris, is the opening through which many animals take in food and issue vocal sounds.wikipedia
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Deuterostome

deuterostomesDeuterostomiaDeuterostoma
Which end forms first in ontogeny is a criterion used to classify animals into protostomes and deuterostomes.
Deuterostomia is a subtaxon of the Bilateria branch of the subkingdom Eumetazoa, within Animalia, and are distinguished from protostomes by their deuterostomic embryonic development; in deuterostomes, the first opening (the blastopore) becomes the anus, while in protostomes, it becomes the mouth.

Gastrointestinal tract

intestinegastrointestinaldigestive tract
It is also the cavity lying at the upper end of the alimentary canal, bounded on the outside by the lips and inside by the pharynx and containing in higher vertebrates the tongue and teeth. In animals at least as complex as an earthworm, the embryo forms a dent on one side, the blastopore, which deepens to become the archenteron, the first phase in the formation of the gut.
The mouth, esophagus, stomach and intestines are part of the gastrointestinal tract.

Sea anemone

sea anemonesActiniariaanemones
In less advanced invertebrates such as the sea anemone, the mouth also acts as an anus.
Sea anemones have what can be described as an incomplete gut; the gastrovascular cavity functions as a stomach and possesses a single opening to the outside, which operates as both a mouth and anus.

Gastrulation

gastrulablastoporedorsal lip
In animals at least as complex as an earthworm, the embryo forms a dent on one side, the blastopore, which deepens to become the archenteron, the first phase in the formation of the gut.

Tongue

Glossusforamen cecumblade
In mammals the buccal cavity is typically roofed by the hard and soft palates, floored by the tongue and surrounded by the cheeks, salivary glands, upper and lower teeth.
The tongue is a muscular organ in the mouth of most vertebrates that manipulates food for mastication, and is used in the act of swallowing.

Soft palate

velumpalatepalatine velum
In mammals the buccal cavity is typically roofed by the hard and soft palates, floored by the tongue and surrounded by the cheeks, salivary glands, upper and lower teeth.
The soft palate (also known as the velum, palatal velum, or muscular palate) is, in mammals, the soft tissue constituting the back of the roof of the mouth.

Tooth

teethdentalmaxillary teeth
In mammals the buccal cavity is typically roofed by the hard and soft palates, floored by the tongue and surrounded by the cheeks, salivary glands, upper and lower teeth.
A tooth (plural teeth) is a hard, calcified structure found in the jaws (or mouths) of many vertebrates and used to break down food.

Maxilla

upper jawmaxillaemaxillary bone
The upper teeth are embedded in the upper jaw and the lower teeth in the lower jaw, which articulates with the temporal bones of the skull.
The upper jaw includes the hard palate in the front of the mouth.

Hard palate

bony palatepalatehard
In mammals the buccal cavity is typically roofed by the hard and soft palates, floored by the tongue and surrounded by the cheeks, salivary glands, upper and lower teeth.
It forms a partition between the nasal passages and the mouth.

Cheek

buccalmalarcheeks
In mammals the buccal cavity is typically roofed by the hard and soft palates, floored by the tongue and surrounded by the cheeks, salivary glands, upper and lower teeth.
The area between the inside of the cheek and the teeth and gums is called the vestibule or buccal pouch or buccal cavity and forms part of the mouth.

Skull

craniumcranialhuman skull
The upper teeth are embedded in the upper jaw and the lower teeth in the lower jaw, which articulates with the temporal bones of the skull.
The skull forms the anterior most portion of the skeleton and is a product of cephalisation—housing the brain, and several sensory structures such as the eyes, ears, nose, and mouth.

Thermoregulation

body temperaturethermoregulatethermoregulatory
Some mammals rely on panting for thermoregulation as it increases evaporation of water across the moist surfaces of the lungs, the tongue and mouth.
More often the temperature is taken in the mouth, axilla, ear or groin.

Esophagus

oesophagusesophageallower esophageal sphincter
The buccal cavity empties through the pharynx into the oesophagus.
Food is ingested through the mouth and when swallowed passes first into the pharynx and then into the esophagus.

Amniote

Amniotaamnioteshigher vertebrates
It is also the cavity lying at the upper end of the alimentary canal, bounded on the outside by the lips and inside by the pharynx and containing in higher vertebrates the tongue and teeth.

Phylum

phyladivisionsuperphylum
Some animal phyla, including vertebrates, have a complete digestive system, with a mouth at one end and an anus at the other.

Vertebrate

Vertebratavertebratesvertebral
Some animal phyla, including vertebrates, have a complete digestive system, with a mouth at one end and an anus at the other.

Human digestive system

digestive systemdigestivedigestive tract
Some animal phyla, including vertebrates, have a complete digestive system, with a mouth at one end and an anus at the other.

Anus

analperianalanal opening
Some animal phyla, including vertebrates, have a complete digestive system, with a mouth at one end and an anus at the other.

Ontogeny

ontogeneticontogenesisdevelopment
Which end forms first in ontogeny is a criterion used to classify animals into protostomes and deuterostomes.

Protostome

protostomesProtostomiaprotostoma
Which end forms first in ontogeny is a criterion used to classify animals into protostomes and deuterostomes.

Multicellular organism

multicellularmulticellular organismsmulticellularity
In the first multicellular animals, there was probably no mouth or gut and food particles were engulfed by the cells on the exterior surface by a process known as endocytosis.

Endocytosis

endocytosedendocyticinternalization
In the first multicellular animals, there was probably no mouth or gut and food particles were engulfed by the cells on the exterior surface by a process known as endocytosis.

Vacuole

vacuolesvacuolarvacuolated
The particles became enclosed in vacuoles into which enzymes were secreted and digestion took place intracellularly.

Intracellular

intracellular spaceinside cellswithin the cell
The particles became enclosed in vacuoles into which enzymes were secreted and digestion took place intracellularly.

Amoeba (genus)

Amoebaamoebasamebas
This form of digestion is used nowadays by simple organisms such as Amoeba and Paramecium and also by sponges which, despite their large size, have no mouth or gut and capture their food by endocytosis.