Movement (clockwork)

movementmovementswatch movementcalibrewatch movementscaliberclock movementclockwork mechanismmechanical movements movement
In horology, a movement, also known as a caliber, is the mechanism of a watch or timepiece, as opposed to the case, which encloses and protects the movement, and the face, which displays the time.wikipedia
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Watch

wristwatchwatchesdigital watch
In horology, a movement, also known as a caliber, is the mechanism of a watch or timepiece, as opposed to the case, which encloses and protects the movement, and the face, which displays the time. A mechanical movement contains all the moving parts of a watch or clock except the hands, and in the case of pendulum clocks, the pendulum and driving weights.
Today, most watches in the market that are inexpensive and medium-priced, used mainly for timekeeping, have quartz movements.

Clockwork

clockwork motorclockworksClockwork Doll
The term originated with mechanical timepieces, whose clockwork movements are made of many moving parts.
Clockwork refers to the inner workings of either mechanical machines called clocks (where it is also called the movement) or other mechanisms that work similarly, using a complex series of gears.

Clock

clockstimepiecemechanical clock
In horology, a movement, also known as a caliber, is the mechanism of a watch or timepiece, as opposed to the case, which encloses and protects the movement, and the face, which displays the time. A mechanical movement contains all the moving parts of a watch or clock except the hands, and in the case of pendulum clocks, the pendulum and driving weights.
Spring power presented clockmakers with a new problem: how to keep the clock movement running at a constant rate as the spring ran down.

Grandfather clock

longcase clocklongcase clocksgrandfather clocks
One source recommends servicing intervals of: 3–5 years for watches, 15–20 years for grandfather clocks, 10–15 years for wall or mantel clocks, 15–20 years for anniversary clocks, and 7 years for cuckoo clocks, with the longer intervals applying to antique timepieces.
Traditionally, longcase clocks were made with two types of movement: eight-day and one-day (30-hour) movements.

Pendulum clock

regulator clockClock pendulumregulator
A mechanical movement contains all the moving parts of a watch or clock except the hands, and in the case of pendulum clocks, the pendulum and driving weights.
In his 1673 analysis of pendulums, Horologium Oscillatorium, Huygens showed that wide swings made the pendulum inaccurate, causing its period, and thus the rate of the clock, to vary with unavoidable variations in the driving force provided by the movement.

Horology

horologisthorologicalhorologists
In horology, a movement, also known as a caliber, is the mechanism of a watch or timepiece, as opposed to the case, which encloses and protects the movement, and the face, which displays the time.

Pocket watch

pocketwatchfob watchwatch fob
When buying a quality pocketwatch from the mid-19th to the mid-20th century, for example, the customer would select movement and case individually.
Up to the 1720s, almost all watch movements were based on the verge escapement, which had been developed for large public clocks in the 14th century.

Pendulum

pendulumssimple pendulumpendula
A mechanical movement contains all the moving parts of a watch or clock except the hands, and in the case of pendulum clocks, the pendulum and driving weights. Oscillator: The timekeeping element, either a pendulum or a balance wheel. It swings back and forth, with a precisely constant time interval between each swing, called the beat. A pendulum movement has a pendulum hangar usually attached to a sturdy support on the back, from which the pendulum is suspended and a fork which gives the pendulum impulses. The oscillator always has some means for adjusting the rate of the clock. Pendulums usually have an adjustment nut under the bob, while balance wheels have a regulator lever on the balance spring.
In a clock, the pendulum must receive pushes from the clock's movement to keep it swinging, to replace the energy the pendulum loses to friction.

Ébauche

ebaucheébauchesAssortiments
The movement parts are separated into two main categories: those belonging to the ébauches and those belonging to the assortments.
Horology, clockmaking and watchmaking appropriated the term ébauche to refer to an incomplete or unassembled watch movement and its associated components.

Spring Drive

Seiko Spring DriveSpring drive watch
Spring Drive
The Spring Drive is a watch movement that was developed by Seiko Epson through collaboration with Seiko Instruments and Seiko Holdings.

Chinese standard movement

Chinese standard movement
The Chinese Standard Movement, also commonly known as the "Tongji" (Chinese: 统机, "unified") movement, is a mechanical watch movement that was developed in the People's Republic of China during its fourth Five-Year Plan in the 1970s.

Hack watch

hackingnon-hacking
Additionally, a distinction is also sometimes made on whether or not the movement offers hacking, allowing the second hand to be stopped.
A hack watch is a watch whose movement offers a mechanism for stopping and setting the second hand of the watch, then restarting the watch the instant the time setting matches the time displayed by a reference timepiece.

Wheel train

going traingear trainkeyless winding
Wheel train: A gear train that transmits the force of the power source to the escapement. Large gears known as wheels mesh with small gears known as pinions. The wheels in a typical going train are the centre wheel, third wheel, and fourth wheel. A separate set of wheels, the motion work, divides the motion of the minute hand by 12 to move the hour hand and in watches another set, the keyless work, allows the hands to be set.
Watch movements are very standardized, and the wheel trains of most watches have the same parts.

Clock face

dialfacehour hand
In horology, a movement, also known as a caliber, is the mechanism of a watch or timepiece, as opposed to the case, which encloses and protects the movement, and the face, which displays the time.

Quartz clock

quartz watchquartzquartz movement
It is less frequently applied to modern electronic or quartz timepieces, where the word module is often used instead.

Mantel clock

mantelmantel clocksshelf clock
One source recommends servicing intervals of: 3–5 years for watches, 15–20 years for grandfather clocks, 10–15 years for wall or mantel clocks, 15–20 years for anniversary clocks, and 7 years for cuckoo clocks, with the longer intervals applying to antique timepieces.

Torsion pendulum clock

anniversary clockclock springtorsion pendulum
One source recommends servicing intervals of: 3–5 years for watches, 15–20 years for grandfather clocks, 10–15 years for wall or mantel clocks, 15–20 years for anniversary clocks, and 7 years for cuckoo clocks, with the longer intervals applying to antique timepieces.

Cuckoo clock

cuckoo clockscuckoocuckoo-clock
One source recommends servicing intervals of: 3–5 years for watches, 15–20 years for grandfather clocks, 10–15 years for wall or mantel clocks, 15–20 years for anniversary clocks, and 7 years for cuckoo clocks, with the longer intervals applying to antique timepieces.

Mainspring

springspring motorspring-wound
Power source: Either a mainspring, or a weight suspended from a cord wrapped around a pulley. The mainspring or pulley has a mechanism to allow it to be wound up, which includes a ratchet to prevent it from unwinding. The barrel or pulley has gear teeth on it which drives the center wheel.

Pulley

pulleyspulley wheelBlock and tackle
Power source: Either a mainspring, or a weight suspended from a cord wrapped around a pulley. The mainspring or pulley has a mechanism to allow it to be wound up, which includes a ratchet to prevent it from unwinding. The barrel or pulley has gear teeth on it which drives the center wheel.

Ratchet (device)

ratchetratchetingpawl
Power source: Either a mainspring, or a weight suspended from a cord wrapped around a pulley. The mainspring or pulley has a mechanism to allow it to be wound up, which includes a ratchet to prevent it from unwinding. The barrel or pulley has gear teeth on it which drives the center wheel.

Gear train

gear ratioreduction gearreduction gearing
Wheel train: A gear train that transmits the force of the power source to the escapement. Large gears known as wheels mesh with small gears known as pinions. The wheels in a typical going train are the centre wheel, third wheel, and fourth wheel. A separate set of wheels, the motion work, divides the motion of the minute hand by 12 to move the hour hand and in watches another set, the keyless work, allows the hands to be set.

Pinion

pinionscog wheelpinion gear
Wheel train: A gear train that transmits the force of the power source to the escapement. Large gears known as wheels mesh with small gears known as pinions. The wheels in a typical going train are the centre wheel, third wheel, and fourth wheel. A separate set of wheels, the motion work, divides the motion of the minute hand by 12 to move the hour hand and in watches another set, the keyless work, allows the hands to be set.

Escapement

detent escapementCross-beat escapementduplex escapements
Escapement: A mechanism that allows the wheel train to advance, or escape a fixed amount with each swing of the balance wheel or pendulum. It consists of a gear called an escape wheel which is released one tooth at a time by a lever that rocks back and forth. Each time the escape wheel moves forward it also gives the pendulum or balance wheel a push to keep it moving.

Balance wheel

foliotcompensation balanceauxiliary temperature compensation
Oscillator: The timekeeping element, either a pendulum or a balance wheel. It swings back and forth, with a precisely constant time interval between each swing, called the beat. A pendulum movement has a pendulum hangar usually attached to a sturdy support on the back, from which the pendulum is suspended and a fork which gives the pendulum impulses. The oscillator always has some means for adjusting the rate of the clock. Pendulums usually have an adjustment nut under the bob, while balance wheels have a regulator lever on the balance spring.