A report on Movie projector and Xenon arc lamp

35 mm movie projector in operation
15 kW xenon short-arc lamp used in IMAX projectors
Simulation of a spinning zoopraxiscope
An early short arc xenon lamp, the Osram-STUD XBO 1001 of ~1954
An early projector and seats from a movie theater
An end-view of a 15 kW IMAX lamp showing the liquid-cooling ports
1910's 35mm hand-cranked tinplate toy movie projector manufactured by Leonhard Müller in Nuremberg, Germany.
An Osram 100 W xenon/mercury short-arc lamp in reflector
35 mm Kinoton FP30ST movie projector, with parts labeled. (Click thumbnail for larger text.)
Perspective view of 3 kW lamp showing plastic safety shield used during shipping.
Mechanical sequence when image is shown twice and then advanced. 
Outer sprockets rotate continuously while the frame advance sprockets are controlled by the mechanism shown – a Geneva drive.
Output profile of a xenon arc lamp.
Imaging lens Diastar of an Askania 35 mm movie projector (focal length: 400 mm)
A xenon arc lamp (Osram XBO 4000W).
Christie AW3 platter, BIG SKY Industries console, and Century SA projector
A Cermax 2 kW xenon lamp from a video projector. A pair of heatsinks are clamped on the two metal bands around the perimeter, which also double to supply power to the lamp's electrodes.
nonrewind in Royal – Malmö, Sweden
A 1 kW xenon short-arc lamp power supply with the cover removed.
A diagram of the VistaVision format
A photo of a 35 mm film print featuring all four audio formats (or "quad track")- from left to right: SDDS (blue area to the left of the sprocket holes), Dolby Digital (grey area between the sprocket holes labelled with the Dolby "Double-D" logo in the middle), analog optical sound (the two white lines to the right of the sprocket holes), and the Datasat time code (the dashed line to the far right.)
Simulated wide screen image with 1.96 to 1 ratio as it would be seen in a camera viewfinder or on a theater screen
Simulated anamorphed image with 1.33 to 1 ratio (4:3) as it would appear on a frame of film

It produces a bright white light to simulate sunlight, with applications in movie projectors in theaters, in searchlights, and for specialized uses in industry and research.

- Xenon arc lamp

The Xenon arc lamp was introduced in Germany in 1957 and in the US in 1963.

- Movie projector
35 mm movie projector in operation

3 related topics with Alpha

Overall

The 15 kW xenon short-arc lamp used in the IMAX projection system.

Arc lamp

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Lamp that produces light by an electric arc .

Lamp that produces light by an electric arc .

The 15 kW xenon short-arc lamp used in the IMAX projection system.
A mercury arc lamp from a fluorescence microscope.
A krypton long arc lamp (top) is shown above a xenon flashtube. The two lamps, used for laser pumping, are very different in the shape of the electrodes, in particular, the cathode (on the left).
A krypton arc lamp during operation.
A carbon arc lamp, cover removed, on the point of ignition. This model requires manual adjustment of the electrodes
An electric arc, demonstrating the “arch” effect.
Early experimental carbon arc light powered by liquid batteries, similar to Davy's
Medical carbon arc lamp used to treat skin conditions, 1909
Self-regulating arc lamp proposed by William Edwards Staite and William Petrie in 1847

It continued in use in more specialized applications where a high intensity point light source was needed, such as searchlights and movie projectors until after World War II.

The xenon arc lamp, which produces a high intensity white light, is now used in many of the applications which formerly used the carbon arc, such as movie projectors and searchlights.

Stadium seating rows closer to digital cinema screens offer significantly more immersive experiences.

Digital cinema

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Digital cinema refers to adoption of digital technology within the film industry to distribute or project motion pictures as opposed to the historical use of reels of motion picture film, such as 35 mm film.

Digital cinema refers to adoption of digital technology within the film industry to distribute or project motion pictures as opposed to the historical use of reels of motion picture film, such as 35 mm film.

Stadium seating rows closer to digital cinema screens offer significantly more immersive experiences.
Texas Instruments, DLP Cinema Prototype Projector, Mark V, 2000
AMC Theatres former corporate headquarters in Kansas City, prior to their 2013 move to Leawood, Kansas.
Broadcasting antenna in Stuttgart

Digital movies are projected using a digital video projector instead of a film projector, are shot using digital movie cameras and edited using a non-linear editing system (NLE).

Light from the lamp, usually a Xenon arc lamp similar to those used in film projectors with a power between 1 kW and 7 kW, is split by colored filters into red, green and blue beams which are directed at the appropriate DMD.

A comparison between 35 mm and 15/70 mm negative areas.

IMAX

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A comparison between 35 mm and 15/70 mm negative areas.
IMAX projector with horizontal film reel
An IMAX cinema camera, displayed at the National Science and Media Museum, Bradford, England
The 15 kW Xenon short-arc lamp used in IMAX projectors
A typical entrance to an IMAX digital theater, such as the AMC Barton Creek Square 14 in Austin, Texas
Outside of the IMAX dome in Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico
Planetario Alfa, museum, astronomical observatory and IMAX Dome system, Monterrey, Nuevo León, Mexico
The frame layout of the IMAX Dome film
The control room of an IMAX Dome theatre at Cosmonova at the Swedish Museum of Natural History in Stockholm, Sweden
Closeup of an IMAX Dome 70mm film reel at Cosmonova
Audiences view a film using 3D glasses.
Christopher Nolan has been a vocal supporter of the IMAX 70 mm film format, and has collaborated with the company since the mid-2000s.
STS 41-C mission specialist Terry J. Hart, holds a 70-pound IMAX camera in the mid-deck of the space shuttle Challenger in 1984.
IMAX Filming at Paranal Observatory

IMAX is a proprietary system of high-resolution cameras, film formats, film projectors, and theaters known for having very large screens with a tall aspect ratio (approximately either 1.43:1 or 1.90:1) and steep stadium seating.

The xenon short-arc lamps are made with a thin envelope of fused quartz and contain xenon gas at a pressure of about 25 atmospheres (367 psi).