Mughal Empire

MughalMughalsMughal IndiaMughal EmperorMughal eraMoghulMughal dynastyMughal periodMughal ruleMogul
The Mughal (or Moghul) Empire was an early-modern empire in South Asia.wikipedia
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Babur

BabarZahir-ud-din Muhammad BaburBabur Beg
The Mughal Empire is conventionally said to have been founded in 1526 by Babur, a warrior chieftain from what today is Uzbekistan, who employed aid from the neighboring Safavid and Ottoman empires to defeat the Sultan of Delhi, Ibrahim Lodhi, in the First Battle of Panipat, and to sweep down the plains of Upper India. Contemporaries referred to the empire founded by Babur as the Timurid empire, which reflected the heritage of his dynasty, and this was the term preferred by the Mughals themselves.
Babur (14 February 1483 – 26 December 1530), born Zahīr ud-Dīn Muhammad, was the founder and first Emperor of the Mughal dynasty in the Indian subcontinent.

Afghanistan

AfghanIslamic Republic of AfghanistanAfghans
For some two centuries, the empire stretched from the outer fringes of the Indus basin in the west, northern Afghanistan in the northwest, and Kashmir in the north, to the highlands of present-day Assam and Bangladesh in the east, and the uplands of the Deccan plateau in South India. He established himself in Kabul and then pushed steadily southward into India from Afghanistan through the Khyber Pass.
The land also served as the source from which the Kushans, Hephthalites, Samanids, Saffarids, Ghaznavids, Ghorids, Khaljis, Mughals, Hotaks, Durranis, and others have risen to form major empires.

Bangladesh

People's Republic of BangladeshBangladeshiBangla Desh
For some two centuries, the empire stretched from the outer fringes of the Indus basin in the west, northern Afghanistan in the northwest, and Kashmir in the north, to the highlands of present-day Assam and Bangladesh in the east, and the uplands of the Deccan plateau in South India.
In 1576, the area was absorbed into the Mughal Empire, although part was overrun by the Suri Empire.

Akbar

Akbar the GreatEmperor AkbarJalaluddin Muhammed Akbar
The Mughal imperial structure, however, is sometimes dated to 1600, to the rule of Babur's grandson, Akbar.
A strong personality and a successful general, Akbar gradually enlarged the Mughal Empire to include most of the Indian subcontinent.

Kashmir

Pakistan administered KashmirKashmir regionPakistan-administered Kashmir
For some two centuries, the empire stretched from the outer fringes of the Indus basin in the west, northern Afghanistan in the northwest, and Kashmir in the north, to the highlands of present-day Assam and Bangladesh in the east, and the uplands of the Deccan plateau in South India.
Kashmir was part of the Mughal Empire from 1586 to 1751, and thereafter, until 1820, of the Afghan Durrani Empire.

Mughal architecture

MughalarchitectureMughal architectural style
There was more conspicuous consumption among the Mughal elite, resulting in greater patronage of painting, literary forms, textiles, and architecture, especially during the reign of Shah Jahan.
Mughal Architecture is the type of Indo-Islamic architecture developed by the Mughals in the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries throughout the ever-changing extent of their empire in the Indian subcontinent.

Indian Rebellion of 1857

Indian MutinyIndian RebellionSepoy Mutiny
The empire was formally dissolved by the British Raj after the Indian Rebellion of 1857.
After the outbreak of the mutiny in Meerut, the rebels very quickly reached Delhi, whose 81-year-old Mughal ruler, Bahadur Shah Zafar, they declared the Emperor of Hindustan.

North India

Northern IndianorthernNorth Indian
The Mughal Empire is conventionally said to have been founded in 1526 by Babur, a warrior chieftain from what today is Uzbekistan, who employed aid from the neighboring Safavid and Ottoman empires to defeat the Sultan of Delhi, Ibrahim Lodhi, in the First Battle of Panipat, and to sweep down the plains of Upper India.
North India has been the historical centre of the Mughal, Delhi Sultanate and British Indian Empire.

Outline of South Asian history

History of South AsiaSouth Asian historyhistory of the Indian subcontinent
At its greatest extent, it was one of the largest empires in the history of South Asia.

First Battle of Panipat

Battle of PanipatBattle of Panipat (1526)Panipat
The Mughal Empire is conventionally said to have been founded in 1526 by Babur, a warrior chieftain from what today is Uzbekistan, who employed aid from the neighboring Safavid and Ottoman empires to defeat the Sultan of Delhi, Ibrahim Lodhi, in the First Battle of Panipat, and to sweep down the plains of Upper India.
It took place in north India and marked the beginning of the Mughal Empire and the end of the Delhi Sultanate.

Agra Fort

Red FortAmar Singh GateFort
Among the Mughal UNESCO World Heritage Sites in South Asia are: Agra Fort, Fatehpur Sikri, Red Fort, Humayun's Tomb, Lahore Fort and the Taj Mahal, which is described as, "The jewel of Muslim art in India, and one of the universally admired masterpieces of the world's heritage."
It was the main residence of the emperors of the Mughal Dynasty until 1638, when the capital was shifted from Agra to Delhi.

Fatehpur Sikri

FatehpurSikriFathpur Sikri
Among the Mughal UNESCO World Heritage Sites in South Asia are: Agra Fort, Fatehpur Sikri, Red Fort, Humayun's Tomb, Lahore Fort and the Taj Mahal, which is described as, "The jewel of Muslim art in India, and one of the universally admired masterpieces of the world's heritage."
The city itself was founded as the capital of Mughal Empire in 1571 by Emperor Akbar, serving this role from 1571 to 1585, when Akbar abandoned it due to a campaign in Punjab and was later completely abandoned in 1610.

Taj Mahal

Tajmahalthe Taj MahalMahal
Among the Mughal UNESCO World Heritage Sites in South Asia are: Agra Fort, Fatehpur Sikri, Red Fort, Humayun's Tomb, Lahore Fort and the Taj Mahal, which is described as, "The jewel of Muslim art in India, and one of the universally admired masterpieces of the world's heritage."
It was commissioned in 1632 by the Mughal emperor Shah Jahan (reigned from 1628 to 1658) to house the tomb of his favourite wife, Mumtaz Mahal; it also houses the tomb of Shah Jahan himself.

Mughal painting

MughalMughal miniatureMughal art
There was more conspicuous consumption among the Mughal elite, resulting in greater patronage of painting, literary forms, textiles, and architecture, especially during the reign of Shah Jahan.
It emerged from Persian miniature painting, and developed largely in the court of the Mughal Empire of the 16th to 18th centuries.

Assam

Assam, IndiaAssam StateAssamese
For some two centuries, the empire stretched from the outer fringes of the Indus basin in the west, northern Afghanistan in the northwest, and Kashmir in the north, to the highlands of present-day Assam and Bangladesh in the east, and the uplands of the Deccan plateau in South India.
It split into two in c. 1581 CE, the western part as a Moghul vassal and the eastern as an Ahom satellite state.

Lahore Fort

Alamgiri GateMori GateAkbari Gate
Among the Mughal UNESCO World Heritage Sites in South Asia are: Agra Fort, Fatehpur Sikri, Red Fort, Humayun's Tomb, Lahore Fort and the Taj Mahal, which is described as, "The jewel of Muslim art in India, and one of the universally admired masterpieces of the world's heritage."
The Lahore Fort is notable for having been almost entirely rebuilt in the 17th century, when the Mughal Empire was at the height of its splendour and opulence.

Ain-i-Akbari

Ain-e-AkbariAaine-AkbariAi'n-e Akbari
Another name for the empire was Hindustan, which was documented in the Ain-i-Akbari, and which has been described as the closest to an official name for the empire.
The Ain-i-Akbari or the "Administration of Akbar", is a 16th-century detailed document recording the administration of the Mughal Empire under Emperor Akbar, written by his court historian, Abu'l Fazl in the Persian language.

Humayun

Emperor HumayunHamayunHumayun-nama
The instability of the empire became evident under his son, Humayun (reigned 1530–1556), who was forced into exile in Persia by rebels.
Nasir-ud-Din Muḥammad (6 March 1508 – 27 January 1556), better known by his regnal name, Humayun, was the second emperor of the Mughal Empire, who ruled over territory in what is now Afghanistan, Pakistan, Northern India, and Bangladesh from 1530–1540 and again from 1555–1556.

Delhi Sultanate

Sultanate of DelhiSultan of DelhiDelhi
The Mughal Empire is conventionally said to have been founded in 1526 by Babur, a warrior chieftain from what today is Uzbekistan, who employed aid from the neighboring Safavid and Ottoman empires to defeat the Sultan of Delhi, Ibrahim Lodhi, in the First Battle of Panipat, and to sweep down the plains of Upper India.
In 1526, the Sultanate was conquered and succeeded by the Mughal Empire.

Bairam Khan

Bairam Khan-i-KhananBayram KhanBehrám Khán
Akbar succeeded to the throne under a regent, Bairam Khan, who helped consolidate the Mughal Empire in India.
18 January 1501) was an important military commander, later commander-in-chief of the Mughal army, a powerful statesman and regent at the court of the Mughal Emperors, Humayun and Akbar.

Timurid dynasty

TimuridTimuridsHouse of Timur
Contemporaries referred to the empire founded by Babur as the Timurid empire, which reflected the heritage of his dynasty, and this was the term preferred by the Mughals themselves.
Members of the Timurid dynasty were strongly influenced by the Persian culture and established two significant empires in history, the Timurid Empire (1370–1507) based in Persia and Central Asia, and the Mughal Empire (1526–1857) based in the Indian subcontinent.

Kabul

Kabul, AfghanistanNeighborhood of KabulKabul City
He established himself in Kabul and then pushed steadily southward into India from Afghanistan through the Khyber Pass.
It has been part of the Achaemenids followed by the Seleucids, Mauryans, Kushans, Kabul Shahis, Saffarids, Samanids, Ghaznavids, Ghurids, Khwarazmians, Qarlughids, Khaljis, Timurids, Mughals, and Hotaks, until finally becoming part of the Durrani Empire (also known as the "Afghan Empire") in 1747.

Aurangzeb

AurangazebEmperor AurangzebAurengzeb
This imperial structure lasted until 1720, until shortly after the death of the last major emperor, Aurengzeb, during whose reign the empire also achieved its maximum geographical extent.
Widely considered to be the last effective ruler of the Mughal Empire, Aurangzeb compiled the Fatawa-e-Alamgiri, and was among the few monarchs to have fully established Sharia law and Islamic economics throughout the Indian subcontinent.

Sher Shah Suri

Sher ShahShershah SuriSher Khan
The Sur Empire (1540–1555), founded by Sher Shah Suri (reigned 1540–1545), briefly interrupted Mughal rule.
An ethnic Pashtun, Sher Shah took control of the Mughal Empire in 1538.

Company rule in India

IndiaBritish IndiaCompany Rule
The empire subsequently fragmented, reduced to the region in and around Old Delhi by the time the British East India Company came to rule most of India.
The area encompassed by modern India was significantly fractured following the decline of the Mughal Empire in the first half of the 18th century