Multicultural London English

Multicultural LondonJafaicanEnglish with borrowed expressionsblack accentBlack BritishBlack British EnglishBlack EnglishBritish Black Englishhybrid accentIn the United Kingdom
Multicultural London English (abbreviated MLE) is a sociolect of English that emerged in the late twentieth century.wikipedia
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London

London, EnglandLondon, United KingdomLondon, UK
It is spoken authentically by mainly young working class people in London (although there is evidence to suggest that certain features are spreading further afield ).
The accent of a 21st-century Londoner varies widely; what is becoming more and more common amongst the under-30s however is some fusion of Cockney with a whole array of ethnic accents, in particular Caribbean, which form an accent labelled Multicultural London English (MLE).

Multiethnolect

As a result, it can be regarded as a multiethnolect.
Wiese (2006) uses the term German Kiezdeutsch, meaning ‘neighbourhood German’, to refer to multiethnic youth language in Germany.

Tag question

tag questionsquestion tagQuestion Tags
* Innit, a reduction of 'isn't it', has a third discourse function in MLE, in addition to the widespread usage as a tag-question or a follow-up as in [1] and [2] below.

Cockney

Cockney accentCockney EnglishCockney dialect
While older speakers in London today display a vowel and consonant system that matches previously dominant accents such as Cockney, young speakers often display different qualities.
In parts of London's East End, some traditional features of cockney have been displaced by a Jamaican Creole-influenced variety popular among young Londoners (sometimes referred to as "Jafaican"), particularly, though far from exclusively, those of Afro-Caribbean descent.

Ali G

Ali G, AiiiIs it cos I is Black?
Ali G is a fictional stereotype of a British suburban male "chav" who imitates urban black British hip hop culture and British Jamaican culture, particularly through hip hop, reggae, drum and bass and jungle music, as well as speaking in rude boy-style English with borrowed expressions from Jamaican Patois.

Attack the Block

Danielle
Representative of the film's plot and location, most of the cast (many of whom spoke Multicultural London English during the film, were young, relative unknowns, and local to the area.

London slang

London street slang21st century London slang
Cockney rhyming slang and Multicultural London English are the best known forms of London slang.

Sociolect

sociolectssocialdemotic speech
Multicultural London English (abbreviated MLE) is a sociolect of English that emerged in the late twentieth century.

English language

EnglishEnglish-languageen
Multicultural London English (abbreviated MLE) is a sociolect of English that emerged in the late twentieth century.

Working class

working-classlower classworkers
It is spoken authentically by mainly young working class people in London (although there is evidence to suggest that certain features are spreading further afield ).

Lancaster University

University of LancasterLancasterThe University of Lancaster
According to research conducted at Lancaster University and Queen Mary University of London in 2010, "In much of the East End of London the Cockney dialect... will have disappeared within another generation.... it will be gone [from the East End] within 30 years.... It has been 'transplanted' to... [Essex and Hertfordshire New] towns."

Queen Mary University of London

Queen Mary, University of LondonQueen Mary CollegeQueen Mary University
According to research conducted at Lancaster University and Queen Mary University of London in 2010, "In much of the East End of London the Cockney dialect... will have disappeared within another generation.... it will be gone [from the East End] within 30 years.... It has been 'transplanted' to... [Essex and Hertfordshire New] towns."

London Borough of Brent

BrentBorough of BrentBrent, London
As the label suggests, speakers of MLE come from a wide variety of ethnic and cultural backgrounds, and live in diverse inner-city neighbourhoods such as Brent, Lambeth and Hackney.

London Borough of Lambeth

LambethBorough of LambethBrixton Town Hall
As the label suggests, speakers of MLE come from a wide variety of ethnic and cultural backgrounds, and live in diverse inner-city neighbourhoods such as Brent, Lambeth and Hackney.

London Borough of Hackney

HackneyHackney, LondonHackney, East London
As the label suggests, speakers of MLE come from a wide variety of ethnic and cultural backgrounds, and live in diverse inner-city neighbourhoods such as Brent, Lambeth and Hackney.

Jamaican English

Jamaican accentJamaicanEnglish
In the press, MLE is sometimes referred to as "Jafaican", conveying the idea of "fake Jamaican", because of popular belief that it stems from immigrants of Jamaican and Caribbean descent.

Economic and Social Research Council

ESRCEconomic and Social Research Council (ESRC)Social Science Research Council
Two Economic and Social Research Council funded research projects found that MLE has most likely developed as a result of language contact and group second language acquisition.

Language contact

contact languagecontactcontact linguistics
Two Economic and Social Research Council funded research projects found that MLE has most likely developed as a result of language contact and group second language acquisition.

Interlanguage

interim languagelearners' varietieslearners’ varieties
Specifically, it can contain elements from "learners' varieties of English, Englishes from the Indian subcontinent and Africa, Caribbean creoles and Englishes along with their indigenised London versions (Sebba 1993), local London and south-eastern vernacular varieties of English, local and international youth slang, as well as more levelled and standard-like varieties from various sources."

Creole language

creolecreolescreole languages
Specifically, it can contain elements from "learners' varieties of English, Englishes from the Indian subcontinent and Africa, Caribbean creoles and Englishes along with their indigenised London versions (Sebba 1993), local London and south-eastern vernacular varieties of English, local and international youth slang, as well as more levelled and standard-like varieties from various sources."

Dialect levelling in Britain

dialect levelingDialect Levellinglevelled
The qualities are on the whole not the levelled ones noted in recent studies (such as Williams & Kerswill 1999 and Przedlacka 2002) of teenage speakers in South East England outside London: Milton Keynes, Reading, Luton, Essex, Slough and Ashford.

South East England

South EastSouth East of EnglandSouth-East England
The qualities are on the whole not the levelled ones noted in recent studies (such as Williams & Kerswill 1999 and Przedlacka 2002) of teenage speakers in South East England outside London: Milton Keynes, Reading, Luton, Essex, Slough and Ashford.

Milton Keynes

Milton Keynes, EnglandMilton Keynes, UKMilton Keynes, Buckinghamshire
The qualities are on the whole not the levelled ones noted in recent studies (such as Williams & Kerswill 1999 and Przedlacka 2002) of teenage speakers in South East England outside London: Milton Keynes, Reading, Luton, Essex, Slough and Ashford.

Reading, Berkshire

ReadingReading, EnglandReading, United Kingdom
The qualities are on the whole not the levelled ones noted in recent studies (such as Williams & Kerswill 1999 and Przedlacka 2002) of teenage speakers in South East England outside London: Milton Keynes, Reading, Luton, Essex, Slough and Ashford.