Multiple sub-Nyquist sampling encoding

Hi-VisionMUSE1035i30MUSE/Hi-VisionMUSE/Hi-Vision releases
MUSE (Multiple sub-Nyquist sampling encoding), was an analog high-definition television standard, using dot-interlacing and digital video compression to deliver 1125-line high definition video signals to the home.wikipedia
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High-definition television

HDTVhigh definitionHD
MUSE (Multiple sub-Nyquist sampling encoding), was an analog high-definition television standard, using dot-interlacing and digital video compression to deliver 1125-line high definition video signals to the home.
HDTV as is known today first started official broadcasting in 1989 in Japan, under the MUSE/Hi-Vision analog system.

High-definition video

HDhigh definitionhigh-definition
MUSE (Multiple sub-Nyquist sampling encoding), was an analog high-definition television standard, using dot-interlacing and digital video compression to deliver 1125-line high definition video signals to the home.
Modern HD specifications date to the early 1980s, when Japanese engineers developed the HighVision 1,125-line interlaced TV standard (also called MUSE) that ran at 60 frames per second.

HD-MAC

1152i25HDMACMac HD
The EBU development and deployment of B-MAC, D-MAC and much later on HD-MAC were made possible by Hi-Vision's technical success.
In September, 1988, the Japanese performed the first High Definition broadcasts of the Olympic games, using their Hi-Vision system (NHK produced material using this format since 1982).

W-VHS

W-VHS allowed home recording of Hi-Vision programmes.
The format was originally introduced in 1994 for use with Japan's Hi-Vision, an early analog high-definition television system.

ISDB

ISDB-TIntegrated Services Digital BroadcastingISDB-S
Japan has since switched to a digital HDTV system based on ISDB, but the original MUSE-based BS Satellite channel 9 (NHK BS Hi-vision) was broadcast until September 30, 2007.
ISDB replaced NTSC-J analog television system and the previously used MUSE Hi-vision analogue HDTV system in Japan, and will be replacing NTSC, PAL-M and PAL-N in South America and the Philippines.

LaserDisc

LDlaser discLaserVision
There were a few MUSE laserdisc players available in Japan: Pioneer HLD-XØ, HLD-X9, HLD-1000, HLD-V500, HLD-V700; Sony HIL-1000, HIL-C1 and HIL-C2EX; the last two ones have OEM versions made by Panasonic, LX-HD10 and LX-HD20.
Encoded using NHK's MUSE "Hi-Vision" analogue TV system, MUSE discs would operate like standard LaserDiscs but would contain high-definition 1,125-line (1,035 visible lines) (Sony HDVS) video with a 5:3 aspect ratio.

Data compression

compressionvideo compressioncompressed
MUSE (Multiple sub-Nyquist sampling encoding), was an analog high-definition television standard, using dot-interlacing and digital video compression to deliver 1125-line high definition video signals to the home.

Interlaced video

interlacedinterlaceinterlacing
The country began broadcasting wideband analog HDTV signals in 1989 using 1035 active lines interlaced in the standard 2:1 ratio (1035i) with 1125 lines total.

NHK Science & Technology Research Laboratories

NHK Science & Technical Research LaboratoriesNHK Technical Research Labs
MUSE, a compression system for Hi-Vision signals, was developed by NHK Science & Technology Research Laboratories in the 1980s, employed 2-dimensional filtering, dot-interlacing, motion-vector compensation and line-sequential color encoding with time compression to 'fold' an original 20 MHz source Hi-Vision signal into a bandwidth of 8.1 MHz.

Companding

compandercompandedcompandor
DPCM Audio compression format: DPCM quasi-instantaneous companding

Signal-to-noise ratio

signal to noise ratioSNRsignal-to-noise
Approximately 3 kW of power would be required, in order to get 40 dB of signal to noise ratio for a composite FM signal in the 22 GHz band.

Luminance

cd/m 2 brightnessluminous
To overcome this limitation, it was decided to use a separate transmission of Y and C.

Chrominance

chromachroma signalcolor
To overcome this limitation, it was decided to use a separate transmission of Y and C.

YUV

Y'UVYUY2YV12
The three terms of the ratio are: the number of brightness ("luminance" "luma" or Y) samples, followed by the number of samples of the two color ("chroma") components: U/Cb then V/Cr, for each complete sample area.

Sampling (signal processing)

sampling ratesamplingsample rate
The three terms of the ratio are: the number of brightness ("luminance" "luma" or Y) samples, followed by the number of samples of the two color ("chroma") components: U/Cb then V/Cr, for each complete sample area.

Compositing

compositedcompositorcomposite
In these cases, the fourth number means the sampling frequency ratio of a key channel.

MPEG-1 Audio Layer II

MP2MPEG-1 Layer IIMUSICAM
It used differential audio transmission (differential pulse-code modulation) that was not psychoacoustics-based like MPEG-1 Layer II.

NICAM

NICAM digital stereoNICAM stereoNear Instantaneous Companded Audio Multiplex
Like the PAL NICAM stereo system, it used near-instantaneous companding (as opposed to Syllabic-companding like the dbx system uses) and non-linear 13-bit digital encoding at a 32 kHz sample rate.

Dbx (noise reduction)

dbxDBX Noise ReductionDBX noise reduction system
Like the PAL NICAM stereo system, it used near-instantaneous companding (as opposed to Syllabic-companding like the dbx system uses) and non-linear 13-bit digital encoding at a 32 kHz sample rate.

Cathode-ray tube

cathode ray tubeCRTcathode ray tubes
MUSE's "1125 lines" are an analog measurement, which includes non-video "scan lines" during which a CRT's electron beam returns to the top of the screen to begin scanning the next field.