Murphy Anderson

Murphy C. Anderson, Jr. (July 9, 1926 – October 22, 2015) was an American comics artist, known as one of the premier inkers of his era, who worked for companies such as DC Comics for over fifty years, starting in the Golden Age of Comic Books in the 1940s.wikipedia
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Zatanna

Zatanna Zataraa woman who pronounces spells backwardsBrother Night
He worked on such characters as Hawkman, Batgirl, Zatanna, the Spectre, and Superman, as well as on the Buck Rogers daily syndicated newspaper comic strip. Anderson and writer Gardner Fox launched the Hawkman series in May 1964 and introduced the Zatanna character in issue #4 (Nov.
The character was created by Gardner Fox and Murphy Anderson, and first appeared in Hawkman #4 (November 1964).

Spectre (DC Comics character)

SpectreThe SpectreCrisis Aftermath: The Spectre
He worked on such characters as Hawkman, Batgirl, Zatanna, the Spectre, and Superman, as well as on the Buck Rogers daily syndicated newspaper comic strip. The Spectre was revived by Fox and Anderson in Showcase #60 (Feb.
1966). Under writer Gardner Fox and penciller Murphy Anderson, his power was vastly increased and at times he approached the level of omnipotence.

Hawkman (Katar Hol)

HawkmanKatar HolSilver Age Hawkman
He worked on such characters as Hawkman, Batgirl, Zatanna, the Spectre, and Superman, as well as on the Buck Rogers daily syndicated newspaper comic strip. Anderson and writer Gardner Fox launched the Hawkman series in May 1964 and introduced the Zatanna character in issue #4 (Nov.
Murphy Anderson took over the art for this series with Gardner Fox continuing as writer.

Buck Rogers

Buck Rogers: Planet of ZoomBuck Rogers in the 25th CenturyWilliam "Buck" Rogers
He worked on such characters as Hawkman, Batgirl, Zatanna, the Spectre, and Superman, as well as on the Buck Rogers daily syndicated newspaper comic strip.
Murphy Anderson was a temporary replacement, but he did not stay long.

Inker

inkinginkedinks
Murphy C. Anderson, Jr. (July 9, 1926 – October 22, 2015) was an American comics artist, known as one of the premier inkers of his era, who worked for companies such as DC Comics for over fifty years, starting in the Golden Age of Comic Books in the 1940s.
In addition, penciller-inker teams like Kirby and Sinnott, Curt Swan and Murphy Anderson, Gene Colan and Palmer, and John Byrne and Terry Austin captured the attentions of comic book fandom.

PS, The Preventive Maintenance Monthly

PSP.S.The Preventive Maintenance Monthly
Anderson also contributed for many years to PS, the preventive maintenance comics magazine of the U.S. Army.
The magazine's artists have included Eisner, Murphy Anderson, Joe Kubert, Dan Spiegle, Scott Madsen, Malane Newman, Alfredo Alcala, and Mike Ploog.

Adam Strange

Alanna2004 Adam Strange miniseriesAdam Strange Archives
Anderson designed the costume of Adam Strange.
Created by editor Julius Schwartz with a costume designed by Murphy Anderson, he first appeared in Showcase #17 (November 1958).

Atomic Knight

Atomic KnightsThe Atomic KnightsAtomic Knight (Gardner Grayle)
Years later, Anderson and writer John Broome created the feature "Atomic Knights" in Strange Adventures #117 (June 1960), which Anderson later described as his favorite assignment.
In all there were 15 early-1960s Atomic Knights stories created by writer John Broome and artist Murphy Anderson; they were a band of heroes living in and protecting the post-apocalyptic future of 1992.

Captain Comet

Anderson succeeded artist and co-creator Carmine Infantino on the superhero feature "Captain Comet" beginning with the story "The Girl from the Diamond Planet" in Strange Adventures #12 (cover-dated Sept. 1951).
From issue #12 (September 1951) Murphy Anderson took over as artist, and he drew all Captain Comet's further appearances in Strange Adventures until #46 (July 1954); Sy Barry and Gil Kane drew the last two stories.

Planet Comics

1944). By the following month he was the regular artist on the Planet Comics features "Life on Other Worlds" and "Star Pirate".
These included the likes of Murphy Anderson, Matt Baker, Nick Cardy, Joe Doolin, Graham Ingels, George Evans, Ruben Moreira, John Cullen Murphy, George Tuska, and Maurice Whitman.

Alley Award

Alley Awards1961 Alley Award1961 Alley Awards
Anderson's accolades include the 1962 Alley Award for "Best Inker"; a 1963 Alley for "Artist Preferred on Justice League of America"; 1964 Alleys for "Best Inking Artist" and for "Best Comic Book Cover" (Detective Comics #329, with penciler Carmine Infantino); 1965 Alleys for, again, "Best Inking Artist" and "Best Comic Book Cover" (The Brave and the Bold #61), as well as for "Best Novel" (an untitled story in Showcase #55, with writer Gardner Fox).

John Broome (writer)

John Broome
Years later, Anderson and writer John Broome created the feature "Atomic Knights" in Strange Adventures #117 (June 1960), which Anderson later described as his favorite assignment.
1952); and the post-apocalyptic heroes the Atomic Knights, with artist Murphy Anderson, in Strange Adventures #117 (June 1960).

Wings Comics

His first confirmed credit is the two-and-two-thirds-page nonfiction aviation featurette "Jet Propulsion" in Wings Comics #48 (cover-dated Aug. 1944), and his first fiction feature was an eight-page "Suicide Smith and the Air Commanders" story in Wings Comics #50 (Oct.
Long-time Superman inker Murphy Anderson's first confirmed credit is the two-and-two-thirds-page nonfiction aviation featurette "Jet Propulsion" in Wings Comics #48 (cover-dated Aug. 1944), and his first fiction feature was an eight-page "Suicide Smith" story in issue #50 (Oct.

Inkpot Award

InkpotInkpot Awards
Anderson received an Inkpot Award in 1984 and was inducted into the Jack Kirby Hall of Fame in 1998 the Will Eisner Hall of Fame in 1999, and the Inkwell Awards Joe Sinnott Hall of Fame in 2013.

Showcase (comics)

ShowcaseShowcase '93New Talent Showcase
Anderson's accolades include the 1962 Alley Award for "Best Inker"; a 1963 Alley for "Artist Preferred on Justice League of America"; 1964 Alleys for "Best Inking Artist" and for "Best Comic Book Cover" (Detective Comics #329, with penciler Carmine Infantino); 1965 Alleys for, again, "Best Inking Artist" and "Best Comic Book Cover" (The Brave and the Bold #61), as well as for "Best Novel" (an untitled story in Showcase #55, with writer Gardner Fox). The Spectre was revived by Fox and Anderson in Showcase #60 (Feb.

Curt Swan

Swan, Curt
With his frequent collaborator, penciler Curt Swan, the pair's artwork on Superman and Action Comics in the 1970s came to be called "Swanderson" by fans.
With his frequent inker Murphy Anderson from 1970–1974 and 1988–1989, the pair's collaborative artwork came to be called "Swanderson" by the fans.

Jack Kirby

KirbyJack "King" Kirby[Jack] Kirby
In the early 1970s, DC assigned Anderson, among other artists, to redraw the heads of Jack Kirby's renditions of Superman and Jimmy Olsen, fearing Kirby's versions were too different from the established images of the characters.
The Superman figures and Jimmy Olsen faces drawn by Kirby were redrawn by Al Plastino, and later by Murphy Anderson.

Elongated Man

Ralph DibnyRalph Dibny / Elongated ManRalph
However, Infantino and inker Murphy Anderson stated that he never used him as a reference for anything.

Carmine Infantino

InfantinoInfantino, Carmine
Anderson succeeded artist and co-creator Carmine Infantino on the superhero feature "Captain Comet" beginning with the story "The Girl from the Diamond Planet" in Strange Adventures #12 (cover-dated Sept. 1951). Anderson's accolades include the 1962 Alley Award for "Best Inker"; a 1963 Alley for "Artist Preferred on Justice League of America"; 1964 Alleys for "Best Inking Artist" and for "Best Comic Book Cover" (Detective Comics #329, with penciler Carmine Infantino); 1965 Alleys for, again, "Best Inking Artist" and "Best Comic Book Cover" (The Brave and the Bold #61), as well as for "Best Novel" (an untitled story in Showcase #55, with writer Gardner Fox).

Justice League

Justice League of AmericaJLAJLA Classified
Anderson's accolades include the 1962 Alley Award for "Best Inker"; a 1963 Alley for "Artist Preferred on Justice League of America"; 1964 Alleys for "Best Inking Artist" and for "Best Comic Book Cover" (Detective Comics #329, with penciler Carmine Infantino); 1965 Alleys for, again, "Best Inking Artist" and "Best Comic Book Cover" (The Brave and the Bold #61), as well as for "Best Novel" (an untitled story in Showcase #55, with writer Gardner Fox).

Nate Butler (comics)

Nate ButlerAida-ZeeThe Nate Butler Studio
*Aida-Zee #1 (inker, assisted by Dan Zolnerowich; also color separations) (1990)
The studio's one-shot, Christian color comic Aida-Zee (1990) featured writers and artists including Dick Ayers, Murphy Anderson, Gaylord DuBois, Nestor Redondo, and Kathleen Webb.

Mystery in Space

Knights of the GalaxyDC Comics Presents: Mystery in SpaceJarko
The artwork featured a considerable number of the 1950s and 1960s finest comics artists such as Carmine Infantino, Murphy Anderson, Gil Kane, Alex Toth, Bernard Sachs, Frank Frazetta, and Virgil Finlay.

Gardner Fox

Gardner F. FoxRod GrayNelson, Bruce
Anderson's accolades include the 1962 Alley Award for "Best Inker"; a 1963 Alley for "Artist Preferred on Justice League of America"; 1964 Alleys for "Best Inking Artist" and for "Best Comic Book Cover" (Detective Comics #329, with penciler Carmine Infantino); 1965 Alleys for, again, "Best Inking Artist" and "Best Comic Book Cover" (The Brave and the Bold #61), as well as for "Best Novel" (an untitled story in Showcase #55, with writer Gardner Fox). Anderson and writer Gardner Fox launched the Hawkman series in May 1964 and introduced the Zatanna character in issue #4 (Nov.
Fox won two 1962 Alley Awards – for Best Script Writer and for Best Book-Length Story ("The Planet that Came to a Standstill" in Mystery in Space #75), with penciler Carmine Infantino — as well as a 1963 Alley, for Favorite Novel ("Crisis on Earths 1 and 2" in Justice League of America #21–22, with penciler Mike Sekowsky), and the 1965 Alley for Best Novel ("Solomon Grundy Goes on a Rampage" in Showcase #55) with penciler Murphy Anderson.

Inkwell Awards

Inkwell AwardInkwell Awards Joe Sinnott Hall of FameInkwell Awards Stacey Aragon Special Recognition Award
Anderson received an Inkpot Award in 1984 and was inducted into the Jack Kirby Hall of Fame in 1998 the Will Eisner Hall of Fame in 1999, and the Inkwell Awards Joe Sinnott Hall of Fame in 2013.

The Brave and the Bold

Brave and the BoldBrave and BoldButcher
Anderson's accolades include the 1962 Alley Award for "Best Inker"; a 1963 Alley for "Artist Preferred on Justice League of America"; 1964 Alleys for "Best Inking Artist" and for "Best Comic Book Cover" (Detective Comics #329, with penciler Carmine Infantino); 1965 Alleys for, again, "Best Inking Artist" and "Best Comic Book Cover" (The Brave and the Bold #61), as well as for "Best Novel" (an untitled story in Showcase #55, with writer Gardner Fox).
The series won Alley Awards in 1962 for "Best Single Comic Book Cover" (#42 by Joe Kubert), in 1965 for "Best Comic Book Cover" (#61 by Murphy Anderson), and in 1968 for "Best Full-Length Story" ("Track of the Hook" in #79 by Bob Haney and Neal Adams).