Murray Bookchin

BookchinBookchin, MurrayCommunalismLocalismSocial ecologistSocial ecology
Murray Bookchin (January 14, 1921 – July 30, 2006) was an American social theorist, author, orator, historian, and political philosopher.wikipedia
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Communalism

communalcommunalistCommunal Effort
In the late-1990s he became disenchanted with the increasingly apolitical lifestylism of the contemporary anarchist movement, stopped referring to himself as an anarchist, and founded his own libertarian socialist ideology called Communalism, which seeks to reconcile Marxist and anarchist thought.
A prominent libertarian socialist, Murray Bookchin, defines the Communalism political philosophy that he developed as "a theory of government or a system of government in which independent communes participate in a federation", as well as "the principles and practice of communal ownership".

Post-Scarcity Anarchism

Among the most important were Our Synthetic Environment (1962), Post-Scarcity Anarchism (1971), The Ecology of Freedom (1982) and Urbanization Without Cities (1987).
Post-Scarcity Anarchism is a collection of essays by Murray Bookchin, first published in 1971 by Ramparts Press.

Our Synthetic Environment

Among the most important were Our Synthetic Environment (1962), Post-Scarcity Anarchism (1971), The Ecology of Freedom (1982) and Urbanization Without Cities (1987). His first book, Our Synthetic Environment, was published under the pseudonym Lewis Herber in 1962, a few months before Rachel Carson's Silent Spring.
Our Synthetic Environment is a 1962 book by Murray Bookchin, published under the pseudonym "Lewis Herber".

Environmental movement

environmental activistenvironmentalenvironmental activism
A pioneer in the ecology movement, Bookchin formulated and developed the theory of social ecology and urban planning, within anarchist, libertarian socialist, and ecological thought.
Beginning in the conservation movement at the beginning of the 20th century, the contemporary environmental movement's roots can be traced back to Murray Bookchin's Our Synthetic Environment, Paul R. Ehrlich's The Population Bomb, and Rachel Carson's Silent Spring.

New Left

American New Leftcultural Leftleftist
His ideas have influenced social movements since the 1960s, including the New Left, the anti-nuclear movement, the anti-globalization movement, Occupy Wall Street, and more recently, the democratic confederalism of Rojava.
Murray Bookchin was also part of the anarchist stream of the New Left, as were the Yippies.

Anarchism

anarchistanarchistsanarchistic
In the late-1990s he became disenchanted with the increasingly apolitical lifestylism of the contemporary anarchist movement, stopped referring to himself as an anarchist, and founded his own libertarian socialist ideology called Communalism, which seeks to reconcile Marxist and anarchist thought.
While in prison, Öcalan corresponded with (and was influenced by) Murray Bookchin, an anarcho-communist theorist and philosopher who developed Communalism and libertarian municipalism.

Goddard College

Goddard SeminaryGoddardGoddard College, Vermont
In the fall of 1973, he was hired by Goddard College to lecture on technology; his lectures led to a teaching position and to the creation of the Social Ecology Studies program in 1974 and the Institute for Social Ecology soon thereafter, of which he became the director.
These programs included the Goddard Experimental Program for Further Education, Design Build Program, Goddard Cambridge Program for Social Change, Third World Studies Program, Institute for Social Ecology, Single Parent Program and many others.

Janet Biehl

A few years later, The Politics of Social Ecology, written by his partner of 19 years, Janet Biehl, briefly summarized these ideas.
Janet Biehl (born September 4, 1953) is an American political writer who is the author of numerous books and articles associated with social ecology, the body of ideas developed and publicized by Murray Bookchin.

Dialectical naturalism

In addition to his political writings, Bookchin wrote extensively on philosophy, calling his ideas dialectical naturalism.
Dialectical naturalism is a term coined by American philosopher Murray Bookchin to describe the philosophical underpinnings of the political program of social ecology.

Decentralization

decentralizeddecentralisationdecentralised
Bookchin was a prominent anti-capitalist and advocate of society's decentralisation along ecological and democratic lines.
New Left and libertarian individuals who identified with social, economic, and often political decentralism through the ensuing years included Ralph Borsodi, Wendell Berry, Paul Goodman, Carl Oglesby, Karl Hess, Donald Livingston, Kirkpatrick Sale (author of Human Scale), Murray Bookchin, Dorothy Day, Senator Mark O. Hatfield, Mildred J. Loomis and Bill Kauffman.

Anarchism in Spain

anarchistanarchistsSpanish anarchist
Also in 1977, he published The Spanish Anarchists, a history of the Spanish anarchist movement up to the revolution of 1936.
An important event in these years was the Congress of 1870 in Barcelona, where delegates from 150 workers' associations met, along with thousands of common workers observing ("occupying every seat, filling the hallways, and spilling out beyond the entrance", according to Murray Bookchin).

New York Workers School

New YorkWorkers CenterWorkers School
He attended the Workers School near Union Square, where he studied Marxism.
Murray Bookchin, communalist (1921—2006)

Libertarian socialism

libertarian socialistlibertarianlibertarian socialists
A pioneer in the ecology movement, Bookchin formulated and developed the theory of social ecology and urban planning, within anarchist, libertarian socialist, and ecological thought.
An important meeting place for international libertarian socialism in the early 1990s was the journal Democracy & Nature in which prominent activists and theorists such as Takis Fotopoulos, Noam Chomsky, Murray Bookchin and Cornelius Castoriadis wrote.

The Movement For a Democracy of Content

Movement For a Democracy of ContentContemporary Issues – A Magazine for a Democracy of Content
From 1947, he collaborated with a fellow lapsed Trotskyist, the German expatriate Josef Weber, in New York in the Movement for a Democracy of Content, a group of 20 or so post-Trotskyists who collectively edited the periodical Contemporary Issues – A Magazine for a Democracy of Content.
The New York City group campaigned hard in support of the 1956 Hungarian Uprising, while also causing a stir with Murray Bookchin's articles about synthetic chemicals in food.

The Ecology of Freedom

Among the most important were Our Synthetic Environment (1962), Post-Scarcity Anarchism (1971), The Ecology of Freedom (1982) and Urbanization Without Cities (1987).
The Ecology of Freedom: The Emergence and Dissolution of Hierarchy is a 1982 book by American libertarian socialist and ecologist Murray Bookchin, in which the author describes his concept of social ecology, the idea that ecological problems are caused by human social problems and can be solved only by reorganizing society among ecological and ethical lines.

Libertarianism

libertarianlibertarianslibertarian state
During this period, Bookchin forged some ties with the nascent libertarian movement.
Murray Bookchin wrote that the Spanish libertarian movement of the mid-1930s was unique because its workers' control and collectives—which came out of a three-generation "massive libertarian movement"—divided the republican camp and challenged the Marxists.

Social Anarchism or Lifestyle Anarchism

1995 essaySocial Anarchism or Lifestyle Anarchism: An Unbridgeable Chasm
Social Anarchism or Lifestyle Anarchism: An Unbridgeable Chasm (1997) ISBN: 1-873176-83-X.
Social Anarchism or Lifestyle Anarchism: An Unbridgeable Chasm is a polemical essay by Murray Bookchin published as a book in 1995.

History of the Green Party of the United States

U.S. Green Party movementfounding meeting of the U.S. Green Party movementGreen Party of the United States
History of the Green Party of the United States
Some of the tensions within the U.S. Green movement were on display at the time - 'party vs. movement', 'deep ecology vs. social ecology' and 'New Left vs. New Age.' Featured speakers included Grace Lee Boggs, Murray Bookchin, Walt Bresette, Guy Chichester, Barbara Epstein, Danny Moses, John Rensenbrink and Ynestra King.

Eco-socialism

eco-socialistecosocialistecosocialism
Eco-socialism
Social ecology is closely related to the work and ideas of Murray Bookchin and influenced by anarchist Peter Kropotkin.

Silent Spring

book of the same titleThe Silent Spring
His first book, Our Synthetic Environment, was published under the pseudonym Lewis Herber in 1962, a few months before Rachel Carson's Silent Spring.
Our Synthetic Environment (1962), by Murray Bookchin

Ecology or Catastrophe

Ecology or Catastrophe: The Life of Murray Bookchin
Biehl, Janet, Ecology or Catastrophe: The Life of Murray Bookchin (Oxford University Press, 2015).
Ecology or Catastrophe: The Life of Murray Bookchin is a 2015 biography of Murray Bookchin by Janet Biehl.

Anarchy Archives

Murray Bookchin entry at the Anarchy Archives

Students for a Democratic Society

SDSStudents for a Democratic Society (SDS)Students for Democratic Society
warned Students for a Democratic Society (in vain) against an impending takeover by a Marxist group.
Bookchin, Murray. Anarchy and Organization: A Letter To The Left. Reprinted from New Left Notes. January 15, 1969. Retrieved April 12, 2005. "The essay originally was written in reply to an attack by Huey Newton on anarchist forms of organization."

Anarchism in the United States

anarchistAmerican anarchistLove and Rage
In 1995, Bookchin lamented the decline of American anarchism into primitivism, anti-technologism, neo-situationism, individual self-expression, and "ad hoc adventurism," at the expense of forming a social movement.
In 1958, Murray Bookchin defined himself as an anarchist, seeing parallels between anarchism and ecology.

Karl Hess

Hess, Karl
"He spoke at a Libertarian Party convention and contributed to a newsletter edited by Karl Hess. In 1976, he told a Libertarian activist that 'If I were a voting man, I'd vote for MacBride' — LP nominee Roger MacBride, that is."
He taught courses and lectured on Appropriate Technology and Social Change in this period at the Institute for Social Ecology in Vermont.