Muscle

musclesmuscularmusculaturemuscle massmuscle strengthmyo-muscular tissuestrengthmuscle lossmuscle tissue
Muscle is a soft tissue found in most animals.wikipedia
1,733 Related Articles

Actin

F-actinG-actinactin cytoskeleton
Muscle cells contain protein filaments of actin and myosin that slide past one another, producing a contraction that changes both the length and the shape of the cell.
An actin protein is the monomeric subunit of two types of filaments in cells: microfilaments, one of the three major components of the cytoskeleton, and thin filaments, part of the contractile apparatus in muscle cells.

Heart

cardiachuman heartapex of the heart
They are primarily responsible for maintaining and changing posture, locomotion, as well as movement of internal organs, such as the contraction of the heart and the movement of food through the digestive system via peristalsis.
The heart is a muscular organ in most animals, which pumps blood through the blood vessels of the circulatory system.

Muscle tissue

musclemuscle fibresmuscular
Muscle tissues are derived from the mesodermal layer of embryonic germ cells in a process known as myogenesis.
Muscle tissue is a soft tissue that composes muscles in animal bodies, and gives rise to muscles' ability to contract.

Skeletal muscle

skeletal musclesskeletalmuscle
There are three types of muscle, skeletal or striated, cardiac, and smooth.
Skeletal muscle is one of three major muscle types, the others being cardiac muscle and smooth muscle.

Peristalsis

peristalticgut motilityperistaltic contractions
They are primarily responsible for maintaining and changing posture, locomotion, as well as movement of internal organs, such as the contraction of the heart and the movement of food through the digestive system via peristalsis.
Peristalsis is a radially symmetrical contraction and relaxation of muscles that propagates in a wave down a tube, in an anterograde direction.

Cardiac muscle

myocardiumheart musclemyocardial
There are three types of muscle, skeletal or striated, cardiac, and smooth.
Cardiac muscle (also called heart muscle or myocardium) is one of three types of vertebrate muscles, with the other two being skeletal and smooth muscles.

Myosin

myosin IImyosin heavy chainmyosins
Muscle cells contain protein filaments of actin and myosin that slide past one another, producing a contraction that changes both the length and the shape of the cell.
Although myosin was originally thought to be restricted to muscle cells (hence myo-(s) + -in), there is no single "myosin"; rather it is a very large superfamily of genes whose protein products share the basic properties of actin binding, ATP hydrolysis (ATPase enzyme activity), and force transduction.

Human digestive system

digestive systemdigestivedigestive tract
They are primarily responsible for maintaining and changing posture, locomotion, as well as movement of internal organs, such as the contraction of the heart and the movement of food through the digestive system via peristalsis.
Peristalsis is the rhythmic contraction of muscles that begins in the esophagus and continues along the wall of the stomach and the rest of the gastrointestinal tract.

Soft tissue

soft tissuessoft-tissueanimal tissue
Muscle is a soft tissue found in most animals.
Soft tissue includes tendons, ligaments, fascia, skin, fibrous tissues, fat, and synovial membranes (which are connective tissue), and muscles, nerves and blood vessels (which are not connective tissue).

Tendon

tendonssinewtendinous
The epimysium anchors muscle tissue to tendons at each end, where the epimysium becomes thicker and collagenous.
A tendon or sinew is a tough band of fibrous connective tissue that connects muscle to bone and is capable of withstanding tension.

Urinary bladder

bladderfundusintravesical
In the human the bladder is a hollow muscular, and distensible (or elastic) organ, that sits on the pelvic floor.

Protein

proteinsproteinaceousstructural proteins
Muscle cells contain protein filaments of actin and myosin that slide past one another, producing a contraction that changes both the length and the shape of the cell.
For instance, yeast proteins are on average 466 amino acids long and 53 kDa in mass. The largest known proteins are the titins, a component of the muscle sarcomere, with a molecular mass of almost 3,000 kDa and a total length of almost 27,000 amino acids.

Animal locomotion

locomotionlocomotor activitylocomotor
They are primarily responsible for maintaining and changing posture, locomotion, as well as movement of internal organs, such as the contraction of the heart and the movement of food through the digestive system via peristalsis.
Here friction and buoyancy are no longer an issue, but a strong skeletal and muscular framework are required in most terrestrial animals for structural support.

Myoglobin

globular proteinsMB
Myoglobin (symbol Mb or MB) is an iron- and oxygen-binding protein found in the muscle tissue of vertebrates in general and in almost all mammals.

Skeleton

skeletalskeletonsskeletal system
Pliant skeletons are beneficial because only muscle contractions are needed to bend the skeleton; upon muscle relaxation, the skeleton will return to its original shape.

Muscle spindle

muscle spindlesmuscle spindle organsneuromuscular spindles
Scattered throughout the muscles are muscle spindles that provide sensory feedback information to the central nervous system.
Muscle spindles are stretch receptors within the body of a muscle that primarily detect changes in the length of the muscle.

Biceps

biceps brachiibiceps brachii musclebicep
Skeletal muscle is arranged in discrete muscles, an example of which is the biceps brachii (biceps).
The biceps (musculus biceps brachii, "two-headed muscle of the arm", sometimes abbreviated to biceps brachii) is a large muscle that lies on the front of the upper arm between the shoulder and the elbow.

Pennate muscle

pennatepennate musclespennation
There is an important distinction seen between pennate muscles and other muscles.
A pennate or pinnate muscle (also called a penniform muscle) is a muscle with fascicles that attach obliquely (in a slanting position) to its tendon.

Deep fascia

investing fasciafasciadeep investing fascia
Together, these fibrous layers, along with tendons and ligaments, constitute the deep fascia of the body.
Deep fascia (or investing fascia) is a fascia, a layer of dense connective tissue that can surround individual muscles and groups of muscles to separate into fascial compartments.

Fermentation

fermentedfermentfermenting
Mammalian muscle carries out the fermentation that occurs during periods of intense exercise where oxygen supply becomes limited, resulting in the creation of lactic acid.

Organ (anatomy)

organorgansviscera
They are primarily responsible for maintaining and changing posture, locomotion, as well as movement of internal organs, such as the contraction of the heart and the movement of food through the digestive system via peristalsis.

Myocyte

muscle fibermuscle cellmuscle cells
Muscle cells contain protein filaments of actin and myosin that slide past one another, producing a contraction that changes both the length and the shape of the cell.
Myocytes are long, tubular cells that develop from myoblasts to form muscles in a process known as myogenesis.

Erector spinae muscles

erector spinaesacrospinalisback muscles
The only epaxial muscles in humans are the erector spinae and small intervertebral muscles, and are innervated by the dorsal rami of the spinal nerves.
The erector spinae is not just one muscle, but a group of muscles and tendons which run more or less the length of the spine on the left and the right, from the sacrum or sacral region (the bony structure beneath your lower back [lumbar] vertebrae and between your hips/glutes) and hips to the base of the skull.

Motor neuron

motor neuronsmotormotor development
In skeletal muscle, contraction is stimulated by electrical impulses transmitted by the nerves, the motoneurons (motor nerves) in particular.
A motor neuron (or motoneuron) is a neuron whose cell body is located in the motor cortex, brainstem or the spinal cord, and whose axon (fiber) projects to the spinal cord or outside of the spinal cord to directly or indirectly control effector organs, mainly muscles and glands.

Vertebra

vertebraeneural spineneural arch
Each somite has 3 divisions, sclerotome (which forms vertebrae), dermatome (which forms skin), and myotome (which forms muscle).
The spinous process serves to attach muscles and ligaments.