Music video

music videosvideovideo albumDVD singleDVDpromotional videovideosSingle VPVlyric video
A music video is a short film that integrates a song with imagery, and is produced for promotional or artistic purposes.wikipedia
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MTV

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Although the origins of the music video date back to musical short films that first appeared in the 1920s, they again came into prominence in the 1980s when the channel MTV (originally "Music Television") based their format around the medium. After relocating to the UK in the mid-1970s, Mulcahy made successful promo films for several noted British pop acts—his early UK credits included XTC's "Making Plans for Nigel" (1979) and his landmark video clip for The Buggles' "Video Killed the Radio Star" (1979), which became the first music video played on MTV in 1981.
MTV originally aired music videos as guided by television personalities known as "video jockeys" (VJs), but in the years since its inception, the network significantly toned down its focus on music in favor of original reality programming targeting teenagers and young adults.

Michael Jackson's Thriller (music video)

ThrillerMichael Jackson's Thrillermusic video
Several of Michael Jackson's videos show the unmistakable influence of the dance sequences in classic Hollywood musicals, including the landmark "Thriller" and the Martin Scorsese-directed "Bad", which was influenced by the stylized dance "fights" in the film version of West Side Story.
Michael Jackson's Thriller is a 1983 music video for the Michael Jackson song "Thriller", directed by John Landis and written by Haechan of the K-Pop boy group NCT and Jackson.

Michael Jackson

MichaelJacksonKing of Pop
Several of Michael Jackson's videos show the unmistakable influence of the dance sequences in classic Hollywood musicals, including the landmark "Thriller" and the Martin Scorsese-directed "Bad", which was influenced by the stylized dance "fights" in the film version of West Side Story.
His music videos, including those for "Beat It", "Billie Jean", and "Thriller" from his 1982 album Thriller, are credited with breaking racial barriers and transforming the medium into an art form and promotional tool.

Scopitone

Scopitones
In the late 1950s the Scopitone, a visual jukebox, was invented in France and short films were produced by many French artists, such as Serge Gainsbourg, Françoise Hardy, Jacques Dutronc, and the Belgian Jacques Brel to accompany their songs.
Scopitone films were a forerunner of music videos.

Queen (band)

QueenMike GroseQueen(band)
The short film clip he produced and directed to promote the single has a striking visual style that predates Queen's similar "Bohemian Rhapsody" video by a full decade. In 1975, the British rock band Queen employed Bruce Gowers to make a promotional video to show their new single "Bohemian Rhapsody" on the BBC music series Top of the Pops. Because music videos are mainly intended to promote the artist, such videos are comparatively rare; three early 1980s examples are Bruce Springsteen's "Atlantic City", directed by Arnold Levine, David Mallet's video for David Bowie and Queen's "Under Pressure", and Ian Emes' video for Duran Duran's "The Chauffeur".
The latter featured "Bohemian Rhapsody", which stayed at number one in the UK for nine weeks and helped popularise the music video format.

The Little Lost Child

Joe Stern and Edward B. Marks
In 1894, sheet music publishers Edward B. Marks and Joe Stern hired electrician George Thomas and various performers to promote sales of their song "The Little Lost Child".
"The Little Lost Child" is a popular song of 1894 by Edward B. Marks and Joseph W. Stern which sold more than two million copies of its sheet music following its promotion as the first ever illustrated song, an early precursor to the music video.

Bohemian Rhapsody

Bohemian Rapsodysong of the same nameBohemian Rhapsody (Opera and Rock Section)
The short film clip he produced and directed to promote the single has a striking visual style that predates Queen's similar "Bohemian Rhapsody" video by a full decade. In 1975, the British rock band Queen employed Bruce Gowers to make a promotional video to show their new single "Bohemian Rhapsody" on the BBC music series Top of the Pops.
The single was accompanied by a promotional video, which scholars consider ground-breaking.

Subterranean Homesick Blues

Bob Dylan-esquepromotional film clipsong
The monochrome 1965 clip for Bob Dylan's "Subterranean Homesick Blues" filmed by D. A. Pennebaker was featured in Pennebaker's Dylan film documentary Dont Look Back.
One of Dylan's first electric recordings, "Subterranean Homesick Blues" is also notable for its innovative film clip, which first appeared in D. A. Pennebaker's documentary Dont Look Back.

These Boots Are Made for Walkin'

These Boots Are Made for WalkingThese Boots Are Made For WalkinThese Boots Were Made For Walking
In 1966, Nancy Sinatra filmed a clip for her song "These Boots Are Made for Walkin'".
In the same year Sinatra recorded a promotional film, which would later be known as the music video, for the song.

Life on Mars (song)

Life on Mars?Life on Marsa David Bowie song
1972), the December 1972 US re-release of "Space Oddity" and the 1973 release of the single "Life on Mars?" (lifted from Bowie's earlier album Hunky Dory).
A music video was filmed by Mick Rock to promote the single release.

The Jean Genie

Jean Geniethe song
Rock directed and edited four clips to promote four consecutive David Bowie singles—"John, I'm Only Dancing" (May 1972), "The Jean Genie" (Nov.
Promoted with a film clip featuring Andy Warhol associate Cyrinda Foxe, it peaked at No.

Peter Whitehead (filmmaker)

Peter WhiteheadPeter Lorrimer WhiteheadPeter Whitehead,
Pink Floyd were pioneers in producing promotional films for their songs including "San Francisco: Film", directed by Anthony Stern, "Scarecrow", "Arnold Layne" and "Interstellar Overdrive", the latter directed by Peter Whitehead, who also made several pioneering clips for The Rolling Stones between 1966 and 1968.
He is also known for his work as a director of promotional film clips (precursors to the modern music video) including a version of "Interstellar Overdrive" for Pink Floyd and several clips for The Rolling Stones.

Help! (film)

Help!Helpfilm
The Beatles' second feature, Help! (1965), was a much more lavish affair, filmed in colour in London and on international locations.
While not reviewed at the time with the same high level of admiration as their first film, the film is regarded a half century later as being influential, including in the subsequent development of music videos.

Bruce Gowers

In 1975, the British rock band Queen employed Bruce Gowers to make a promotional video to show their new single "Bohemian Rhapsody" on the BBC music series Top of the Pops.
Gowers started his career in his native United Kingdom, where his music video for Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody" brought him international recognition, leading to his relocation to the U.S. in the late 1970s.

List of most expensive music videos

most expensive music video ever mademost expensive music videosmost expensive videos
In 1980, the music video to David Bowie's "Ashes to Ashes" became the most expensive ever made, having a production cost of $582,000 (equivalent to $ million in ), the first music video to have a production cost of over $500,000.
This page lists the most expensive music videos ever made, with costs of US$500,000 or more.

Video Concert Hall

Video Concert Hall, created by Jerry Crowe and Charles Henderson and launched on November 1, 1979, was the first nationwide video music programming on American television, predating MTV by almost two years.
Video Concert Hall (VCH) was an American television network launched on November 1, 1979, on the USA Network and on Showtime, featuring an unhosted rotation of music videos.

Michael Lindsay-Hogg

Sir Michael Lindsay-HoggLindsay-Hogg, MichaelSir Michael Edward Lindsay-Hogg, 5th Baronet
In May 1966 they filmed two sets of colour promotional clips for their current single "Rain"/"Paperback Writer" all directed by Michael Lindsay-Hogg, who went on to direct The Rolling Stones Rock and Roll Circus and the Beatles' final film, Let It Be.
Through his work on Ready Steady Go!, Lindsay-Hogg became acquainted with some of the top rock artists of the day, and was subsequently hired to direct promotional films for their songs.

Russell Mulcahy

MulcahyRussel Mulcahy
In need of material for the show, Webb approached Seven newsroom staffer Russell Mulcahy and asked him to shoot film footage to accompany popular songs for which there were no purpose-made clips (e.g. Harry Nilsson's "Everybody's Talkin").
He soon found that he was in demand as a music video director, and after making a number of successful film clips for bands from Australia and New Zealand, including Dragon, and the classic music video for The Saints' "(I'm) Stranded", he relocated to the UK around 1976, Mulcahy joined Jon Roseman Productions International and made successful music videos for several noted British pop acts—his early UK credits included The Sex Pistols, XTC's "Making Plans for Nigel" (1979), The Vapors' hit "Turning Japanese" and his landmark video for The Buggles' "Video Killed the Radio Star" (1979) which became the first music video played on MTV in 1981.

Ashes to Ashes (David Bowie song)

Ashes to Ashesa Bowie songAshes To Ashes (This Is Not America)
In 1980, the music video to David Bowie's "Ashes to Ashes" became the most expensive ever made, having a production cost of $582,000 (equivalent to $ million in ), the first music video to have a production cost of over $500,000.
It is also known for its innovative video, directed by Bowie and David Mallet, which at the time was the most expensive music video ever made.

T.A.M.I. Show

The T.A.M.I. ShowTAMI Showa 1964 concert film
Concert films were being released in the mid-1960s, at least as early as 1964, with the T.A.M.I. Show.
It is considered one of the seminal events in the pioneering of music films, and more importantly, the later concept of music videos.

Paul Drane

Despite the show's minuscule budget, Countdown's original director Paul Drane was able to create several memorable music videos especially for the show, including the classic film-clips for the AC/DC hits "It's a Long Way to the Top (If You Wanna Rock 'n' Roll)" and "Jailbreak".
During this period, he directed several music videos (promotional film clips) made especially for Countdown, including the original clips for the AC/DC hits "It's a Long Way to the Top" and "Jailbreak".

Bad (Michael Jackson song)

BadBad (Afrojack Remix) (DJ Buddha Edit)Bad (Remix)
Several of Michael Jackson's videos show the unmistakable influence of the dance sequences in classic Hollywood musicals, including the landmark "Thriller" and the Martin Scorsese-directed "Bad", which was influenced by the stylized dance "fights" in the film version of West Side Story.
The full music video for "Bad" is an 18-minute short film written by novelist and screenwriter Richard Price, shot by Michael Chapman, and directed by Martin Scorsese.

Night Flight (TV series)

Night FlightNight Flight'' (TV series)
The USA Cable Network program Night Flight was one of the first American programs to showcase these videos as an art form.
It includes a mix of mainstream and alternative music videos, artist interviews, B movies, documentaries, short films, stand-up comedy and animation.

Video Killed the Radio Star

Radio Starvideo really ''might'' kill the radio star
After relocating to the UK in the mid-1970s, Mulcahy made successful promo films for several noted British pop acts—his early UK credits included XTC's "Making Plans for Nigel" (1979) and his landmark video clip for The Buggles' "Video Killed the Radio Star" (1979), which became the first music video played on MTV in 1981.
The accompanying music video was written, directed, and edited by Russell Mulcahy.

David Mallet (director)

David MalletDavid Mallett
Because music videos are mainly intended to promote the artist, such videos are comparatively rare; three early 1980s examples are Bruce Springsteen's "Atlantic City", directed by Arnold Levine, David Mallet's video for David Bowie and Queen's "Under Pressure", and Ian Emes' video for Duran Duran's "The Chauffeur".
David Victor Mark Mallet (born 17 December 1945 in West Horsley, Surrey) is a British director of music videos and concert films.