Musica universalis

music of the spheresharmony of the spheresthe music of the spherescosmic harmonymusica mundanaPythagorean sound healingsecret knowledge of the stars
The musica universalis (literally universal music), also called music of the spheres or harmony of the spheres, is an ancient philosophical concept that regards proportions in the movements of celestial bodies—the Sun, Moon, and planets—as a form of music.wikipedia
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Music

audiomusicalPop
The musica universalis (literally universal music), also called music of the spheres or harmony of the spheres, is an ancient philosophical concept that regards proportions in the movements of celestial bodies—the Sun, Moon, and planets—as a form of music.
Common sayings such as "the harmony of the spheres" and "it is music to my ears" point to the notion that music is often ordered and pleasant to listen to.

Pythagoras

PythagoreanPythagoras of SamosPythagoreans
The discovery of the precise relation between the pitch of the musical note and the length of the string that produces it is attributed to Pythagoras. Pythagoras first identified that the pitch of a musical note is in inverse proportion to the length of the string that produces it, and that intervals between harmonious sound frequencies form simple numerical ratios.
He may have also devised the doctrine of musica universalis, which holds that the planets move according to mathematical equations and thus resonate to produce an inaudible symphony of music.

Orbital resonance

1:1 resonanceresonancemean-motion resonance
Further scientific exploration discovered orbital resonance in specific proportions in some orbital motion.
Before Newton, there was also consideration of ratios and proportions in orbital motions, in what was called "the music of the spheres", or Musica universalis.

Music of the Spheres (Mike Oldfield album)

Music of the SpheresHarbingerMusic of the Spheres'' (Mike Oldfield album)
Among these are Music of the Spheres by Mike Oldfield, Om by the Moody Blues, The Earth Sings Mi Fa Mi album by The Receiving End of Sirens, Music of the Spheres by Ian Brown, and Björk's single Cosmogony, included in her 2011 album Biophilia.
The album, Oldfield's second album with Mercury Records and his first classical work, is based on the concept of a celestial Musica universalis.

Kepler's laws of planetary motion

Kepler's third lawKepler's lawslaws of planetary motion
Finally, after a discussion on astrology in book five, Kepler ends Harmonices by describing his third law, which states that for any planet the cube of the semi-major axis of its elliptical orbit is proportional to the square of its orbital period.
Kepler enunciated in 1619 this third law in a laborious attempt to determine what he viewed as the "music of the spheres" according to precise laws, and express it in terms of musical notation.

Harmony

harmoniesharmonicharmony vocal
In 1619 Kepler published Harmonices Mundi (literally Harmony of the Worlds), expanding on the concepts he introduced in Mysterium and positing that musical intervals and harmonies describe the motions of the six known planets of the time.

Harmonices Mundi

Harmonice MundiHarmony of the Worldbook of the same name
Musica universalis was a traditional philosophical metaphor that was taught in the quadrivium, and was often called the "music of the spheres".

Philosophy

philosophicalphilosopherhistory of philosophy
The musica universalis (literally universal music), also called music of the spheres or harmony of the spheres, is an ancient philosophical concept that regards proportions in the movements of celestial bodies—the Sun, Moon, and planets—as a form of music.

Astronomical object

celestial bodiescelestial bodycelestial object
The musica universalis (literally universal music), also called music of the spheres or harmony of the spheres, is an ancient philosophical concept that regards proportions in the movements of celestial bodies—the Sun, Moon, and planets—as a form of music.

Sun

solarSolThe Sun
The musica universalis (literally universal music), also called music of the spheres or harmony of the spheres, is an ancient philosophical concept that regards proportions in the movements of celestial bodies—the Sun, Moon, and planets—as a form of music.

Moon

lunarthe MoonLuna
The musica universalis (literally universal music), also called music of the spheres or harmony of the spheres, is an ancient philosophical concept that regards proportions in the movements of celestial bodies—the Sun, Moon, and planets—as a form of music.

Planet

planetsFormer classification of planetsplanemo
The musica universalis (literally universal music), also called music of the spheres or harmony of the spheres, is an ancient philosophical concept that regards proportions in the movements of celestial bodies—the Sun, Moon, and planets—as a form of music.

Harmonic

harmonicsflageoletharmonic frequencies
This "music" is not thought to be audible, but rather a harmonic, mathematical or religious concept.

Mathematics

mathematicalmathmathematician
This "music" is not thought to be audible, but rather a harmonic, mathematical or religious concept.

Religion

religiousreligionsreligious beliefs
This "music" is not thought to be audible, but rather a harmonic, mathematical or religious concept.

Scholar

scholarsindependent scholarprivate scholar
The idea continued to appeal to scholars until the end of the Renaissance, influencing many kinds of scholars, including humanists.

Renaissance

the RenaissanceEarly RenaissanceEuropean Renaissance
The idea continued to appeal to scholars until the end of the Renaissance, influencing many kinds of scholars, including humanists.

Humanism

humanisthumanistichumanists
The idea continued to appeal to scholars until the end of the Renaissance, influencing many kinds of scholars, including humanists.

Metaphysics

metaphysicalmetaphysicianmetaphysic
The Music of the Spheres incorporates the metaphysical principle that mathematical relationships express qualities or "tones" of energy which manifest in numbers, visual angles, shapes and sounds – all connected within a pattern of proportion.

Pitch (music)

pitchpitchestone
Pythagoras first identified that the pitch of a musical note is in inverse proportion to the length of the string that produces it, and that intervals between harmonious sound frequencies form simple numerical ratios.

Aristotle

AristotelianAristotelesAristote
Aristotle criticised the notion that celestial bodies make a sound in moving in the context of his own cosmological model:

Boethius

Anicius Manlius Severinus BoethiusBoëthiusBoetius
The three branches of the Medieval concept of musica were presented by Boethius in his book De Musica:

Quadrivium

quadriviamathematicsquadrivial
Musica universalis, which had existed since the Greeks, as a metaphysical concept was often taught in quadrivium, and this intriguing connection between music and astronomy stimulated the imagination of Johannes Kepler, as he devoted much of his time after publishing the Mysterium Cosmographicum (Mystery of the Cosmos) looking over tables and trying to fit the data to what he believed to be the true nature of the cosmos as it relates to musical sound.