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Rifleman

riflemenRfnHuntsmen
The musketeer was a precursor to the rifleman.
Although the rifleman role had its origin with 16th century hand cannoneers and 17th century musketeers, the term originated in the 18th century with the introduction of the rifled musket.

Musket

musketsmusket ballmusketry
A musketeer (mousquetaire) was a type of soldier equipped with a musket.
The musketeers were the first infantry to give up armour entirely.

Military of the Ottoman Empire

Ottoman ArmyOttoman militaryOttoman
The famous Janissary corps of the Ottoman army were using matchlock muskets as early as the 1440s.
Following that, other troop types began to appear, such as the regular musketeers (Piyade Topçu, literally "foot artillery"); regular cavalry armed with firearms (Süvari Topçu Neferi, literally "mounted artillery soldier"), similar to the later European reiter or carabinier; and bombardiers (Humbaracı), consisting of grenadiers who threw explosives called khımbara and the soldiers who served the artillery with maintenance and powder supplies.

Tercio

terciosSpanish Terciosterço
In the Spanish army, the tercio or the Spanish square was a mixed infantry formation that theoretically could have up to 3,000 pikemen, swordsmen and musketeers, although, on the battlefield, it was usually much smaller.
The tercio was an administrative unit with command of up to 3,000 soldiers, subdivided originally into 10, later 12 compañías, made up of pikemen, swordsmen and arquebusiers or musketeers.

German Army (German Empire)

German ArmyImperial German ArmyArmy
The traditional designation of "musketeer" for an infantry private survived in the Imperial German Army until World War I.

Arquebus

arquebusierarquebusiersarquebuses
The musketeer manned tercios were developed from the earlier arquebusier manned coronelías, which had firmly established their fearsome reputation by defeating the French and capturing their king at the Battle of Pavia in 1525.
Similarly, musketeers and musket-wielding infantrymen were despised in society by the feudal knights, even until the time of Cervantes (1547–1616 AD).

Pike and shot

colunellaDutch RegimentsPike & Shot
The infantry formations of the period were a mix of pike and early firearms ("shot"), either arquebusiers or musketeers.

Line infantry

lineinfantry of the lineline regiment
Musketeers and grenadiers, formerly elite troops, gradually became part of the line infantry, switching to linear tactics.

Imperial Guard (Russia)

Imperial GuardRussian Imperial GuardLeib Guard
The Preobrazhensky and Semenovsky regiments of the Imperial Guard replaced the streltsy as the political and military force closest to the tsar.

Jean-François Leriget de La Faye

Leriget de la FayeMarquis de la Faye
At one time a musketeer, through social connections La Faye became a member of the court of Louis XIV.

Germain-François Poullain de Saint-Foix

Saint-Foix
He served with the musketeers until he was 36, distinguishing himself at Guastalla in 1734.

Alexandre Dumas

Alexandre Dumas, pèreDumasAlexander Dumas
The author, Alexandre Dumas, père, based his work on the book Mémoires de Monsieur d'Artagnan, capitaine lieutenant de la première compagnie des Mousquetaires du Roi (Memoirs of Mister d'Artagnan, lieutenant captain of the first company of the King's Musketeers) by Gatien de Courtilz de Sandras (Cologne, 1700).
The proceedings were televised: the new coffin was draped in a blue velvet cloth and carried on a caisson flanked by four mounted Republican Guards costumed as the four Musketeers.

Maison du Roi

King's HouseholdMaison Militaire du RoiRoyal Household
The Musketeers of the Guard were a junior unit, initially of roughly company strength, of the military branch of the Royal Household or Maison du Roi.

Soldier

soldiersservicemenmilitary personnel
A musketeer (mousquetaire) was a type of soldier equipped with a musket.

Early modern warfare

Gunpowder warfareAge of Gunpowderearly modern
Musketeers were an important part of early modern armies, particularly in Europe, as they normally comprised the majority of their infantry.

World War I

First World WarGreat WarWorld War One
The traditional designation of "musketeer" for an infantry private survived in the Imperial German Army until World War I.

Hand cannon

hand cannonsgonnehand-cannon
The hand cannon was invented in China in the 12th century and was in widespread use there in the 13th century.

Ming dynasty

MingMing ChinaMing Empire
Arquebusiers and musketeers were utilized in the armies of the Ming (1368–1644) and Qing dynasties (1644–1911).

Qing dynasty

QingQing EmpireChina
Arquebusiers and musketeers were utilized in the armies of the Ming (1368–1644) and Qing dynasties (1644–1911).

Ottoman Empire

OttomanOttomansTurks
In Zhao Shizhen's book of 1598 AD, the Shenqipu, there were illustrations of Ottoman Turkish riflemen with detailed illustrations of their muskets, alongside European musketeers with detailed illustrations of their muskets. The Ottoman Empire, centering on Turkey and extending into Arabia, used muskets to conquer Constantinople (modern Istanbul) and were one of the earliest users of muskets in a military conflict.

Turkish people

TurkishTurksTurk
In Zhao Shizhen's book of 1598 AD, the Shenqipu, there were illustrations of Ottoman Turkish riflemen with detailed illustrations of their muskets, alongside European musketeers with detailed illustrations of their muskets.

Janissaries

JanissaryJannisaryJannisaries
The famous Janissary corps of the Ottoman army were using matchlock muskets as early as the 1440s.

Matchlock

matchlocksDoghead (firearms)gun
The famous Janissary corps of the Ottoman army were using matchlock muskets as early as the 1440s.

Turkey

TurkishRepublic of TurkeyTUR
The Ottoman Empire, centering on Turkey and extending into Arabia, used muskets to conquer Constantinople (modern Istanbul) and were one of the earliest users of muskets in a military conflict.