Mutt and Jeff

A. MuttMutt & JeffCicero's CatMutt and Jeff cartoon
Mutt and Jeff is a long-running and widely popular American newspaper comic strip created by cartoonist Bud Fisher in 1907 about "two mismatched tinhorns".wikipedia
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Bud Fisher

H. C. "Bud" Fisher
Mutt and Jeff is a long-running and widely popular American newspaper comic strip created by cartoonist Bud Fisher in 1907 about "two mismatched tinhorns".
Harry Conway "Bud" Fisher (April 3, 1885 – September 7, 1954) was an American cartoonist who created Mutt and Jeff, the first successful daily comic strip in the United States.

Al Smith (cartoonist)

Al SmithAl Smith Feature ServiceAl Smith Service
Mutt and Jeff remained in syndication until 1983, employing the talents of several cartoonists, chiefly Al Smith who drew the strip for nearly fifty years.
Al Smith (March 21, 1902 – November 24, 1986) was an American cartoonist whose work included a long run on the comic strip Mutt and Jeff.

Harvey Comics

HarveyHarvey PublicationsHarvey Entertainment
The series eventually became a comic book, initially published by All-American Publications and later published by DC Comics, Dell Comics and Harvey Comics.
Harvey also licensed popular characters from newspaper comic strips, such as Mutt and Jeff and Sad Sack.

All-American Publications

All AmericanAll-American All-American Pubs.
The series eventually became a comic book, initially published by All-American Publications and later published by DC Comics, Dell Comics and Harvey Comics.
Before the merger, Gaines first rebranded All-American with its own logo, beginning with books cover-dated February 1945: All-Flash #17, Sensation Comics #38, Flash Comics #62, Green Lantern #14, Funny Stuff #3, and Mutt & Jeff #16, and the following month's All-American Comics #64 and the hyphenless All Star Comics #24.

Sunday comics

Sunday stripSunday pageSunday
In 1918, Mutt and Jeff added a Sunday strip, and as success continued, Fisher became increasingly dependent on assistants to produce the work.
Other strips offer a gag complete in a single episode, such as Little Iodine and Mutt and Jeff.

Bell Syndicate

Bell-McClure SyndicateBell McClure SyndicateBell Syndicate-North American Newspaper Alliance
A dispute between Fisher and King Features arose in 1913, and Fisher moved his strip on September 15, 1915, to the Wheeler Syndicate (later the Bell Syndicate), who gave Fisher 60% of the gross revenue, an enormous income in those times.
In 1933, just as the concept of "comic books" was getting off the ground, Eastern Color Printing published Funnies on Parade, which reprinted in color several comic strips licensed from the Bell-McClure Syndicate, the Ledger Syndicate, and the McNaught Syndicate, including the Bell Syndicate & Associated Newspaper strips Mutt and Jeff, Cicero, S'Matter, Pop, Honeybunch's Hubby, Holly of Hollywood, and Keeping Up with the Joneses.

National Cartoonists Society

National Cartoonist SocietyReuben AwardReuben Awards
Al Smith received the National Cartoonists Society Humor Comic Strip Award in 1968 for his work on the strip.
By March 1947, the NCS had 112 members, including Bud Fisher (Mutt and Jeff), Don Flowers (Glamor Girls), Bob Kane (Batman), Fred Lasswell (Barney Google and Snuffy Smith), George Lichty (Grin and Bear It), Zack Mosley (The Adventures of Smilin' Jack), Alex Raymond (Rip Kirby), Cliff Sterrett (Polly and Her Pals) and Chic Young (Blondie), plus editorial cartoonists Reg Manning and Fred O. Seibel and sports cartoonist Willard Mullin.

George Herriman

George [HerrimanGeorge Joseph HerrimanThe Family Upstairs
Other assistants on the strip included Ken Kling, George Herriman, and Maurice Sendak (while still in high school).
Following the success of Bud Fisher's daily strip A. Mutt, which debuted in late 1907, Herriman began a similarly sports-themed daily strip starting December 10 called Mr. Proones the Plunger.

Comic strip

comic stripscartoon stripcomic-strip
Mutt and Jeff is a long-running and widely popular American newspaper comic strip created by cartoonist Bud Fisher in 1907 about "two mismatched tinhorns".
(There have been exceptions, however, such as Bud Fisher's Mutt and Jeff being an early — if not the earliest — case in which the creator retained ownership of his work.) Both these practices began to change with the 1970 debut of Universal Press Syndicate, as the company gave cartoonists a 50-percent ownership share of their work.

Al Christie

Al
In early July 1911, during the silent era of motion pictures, at David Horsley's Nestor Comedies in Bayonne, New Jersey, Al Christie began turning out a weekly one-reel live-action Mutt and Jeff comedy short, which was based on the comic strip.
In 1910, Christie began turning out one single-reel, Mutt and Jeff comedy every week.

Famous Funnies

A Carnival of Comics featured such popular syndicated comic strips as The Bungle Family, Dixie Dugan, Joe Palooka, Keeping Up with the Joneses, Mutt and Jeff, Reg'lar Fellers, and Somebody's Stenog, as well as many more.

A. Piker Clerk

The concept of a newspaper strip featuring recurring characters in multiple panels on a six-day-a-week schedule actually had been created by Clare Briggs with A. Piker Clerk four years earlier, but that short-lived effort did not inspire further comics in a comic-strip format.
Mutt, which began in 1907 in the San Francisco Chronicle and evolved into Mutt and Jeff''.

David Horsley

David
In early July 1911, during the silent era of motion pictures, at David Horsley's Nestor Comedies in Bayonne, New Jersey, Al Christie began turning out a weekly one-reel live-action Mutt and Jeff comedy short, which was based on the comic strip.
By 1910 their operation was producing three films a week, including the Mutt and Jeff comedies.

Nestor Film Company

Nestor StudiosNestor Motion Picture CompanyNestor
In early July 1911, during the silent era of motion pictures, at David Horsley's Nestor Comedies in Bayonne, New Jersey, Al Christie began turning out a weekly one-reel live-action Mutt and Jeff comedy short, which was based on the comic strip.
Christie moved permanently to Southern California from the East, where he had been working with the Horsleys creating the popular silent-era Mutt and Jeff comedy shorts.

Bud Duncan

Buddy Duncan
When Alexander was leaving the serial, Christie hired the small actor Bud Duncan.
His first work in the film industry was for the Biograph Company and he later played Jeff in the Nestor Film Company’s film adaptations of the Mutt and Jeff comic strips.

Cupples & Leon

Cupples and Leon
They collected Bringing Up Father, Little Orphan Annie, Mutt and Jeff, Reg'lar Fellers, Smitty, Tillie the Toiler and other leading strips of the 1920s and 1930s.

Pierre de Beaumont

Pete de BeaumontPierre S. (Pete) de BeaumontPierre S. de Beaumont
Currently, Andrews McMeel Universal continues to syndicate Mutt and Jeff under the imprint Classic Mutt and Jeff (in both English and Spanish language versions) under the copyright of Pierre S. de Beaumont (1915–2010), founder of the Brookstone catalog and retail chain.
On 25 October 1925 Aedita de Beaumont married Bud Fisher, the creator of the comic strip Mutt and Jeff, but the couple parted after four weeks.

Topper (comic strip)

toppertopper striptopper strips
Starting October 27, 1926, the Sunday page included a topper strip about Cicero, Mutt's son.

All-American Comics

All American ComicsAll-American WesternAll-American Men of War
Other features included "Toonerville Folks", "Mutt and Jeff", and "Ripley's Believe It or Not!".

Charles Bowers

Charles R. BowersCharles BoyerCharlie Bowers
In 1916, Fisher licensed the production of Mutt and Jeff for animation with pioneers Charles Bowers and Raoul Barré of the Barré Studio.
His early career was as a cartoonist on the Mutt and Jeff series of cartoons for the Barré Studio.

Barré Studio

Barré-Bowers StudioBarré-Bowers StudiosBarré-Nolan Studio
In 1916, Fisher licensed the production of Mutt and Jeff for animation with pioneers Charles Bowers and Raoul Barré of the Barré Studio.
Soon afterward, Barré was contacted by Charles Bowers, who had been animating Mutt and Jeff for a year.

Field Newspaper Syndicate

News America SyndicateChicago Sun-Times SyndicateField Syndicate
In c. 1944, the new Chicago-based Field Syndicate took over the strip.
One of the first major strips syndicated by Field was the hugely popular Mutt and Jeff (first launched in 1907), which moved over from the Bell Syndicate-North American Newspaper Alliance.

Raoul Barré

Raoul BarreBarré, Raoul
In 1916, Fisher licensed the production of Mutt and Jeff for animation with pioneers Charles Bowers and Raoul Barré of the Barré Studio.
Another man who had stood up to Hearst was Bud Fisher, who had the courts uphold his copyright ownership to his Mutt and Jeff comic strip, which had been printed by Hearst newspapers for nine years.

Helter Shelter (The Simpsons)

Helter ShelterBrian PollackHelter Shelter" (''The Simpsons'')
Bart laments having access only to Mutt and Jeff comic books and is quoted as saying, "This has been the worst week of my life. I miss my toys and my video games. Mutt and Jeff comics are NOT funny! They're gay, I get it!".

Cartoonist

comics artistcomic book artistcartooning
Mutt and Jeff is a long-running and widely popular American newspaper comic strip created by cartoonist Bud Fisher in 1907 about "two mismatched tinhorns".