Mutual Broadcasting System

MutualMutual RadioMutual NetworkMutual Radio NetworkMBSMutual BroadcastingMutual Broadcasting Networkdefunct nationwide radio network of the same nameMutual Broadcasting CorporationMutual Broadcasting System, LLC
The Mutual Broadcasting System (commonly referred to simply as Mutual; sometimes referred to as MBS, Mutual Radio or the Mutual Radio Network) was an American commercial radio network in operation from 1934 to 1999.wikipedia
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Major League Baseball on Mutual

MutualMutual Broadcasting SystemBill Corum
For many years, it was a national broadcaster for Major League Baseball (including the All-Star Game and World Series), the National Football League, and Notre Dame football.
Major League Baseball on Mutual was the de facto title of the Mutual Broadcasting System's (MBS) national radio coverage of Major League Baseball games.

Larry King

KingThe Larry King ShowLarry
During the late 1970s, Mutual pioneered the nationwide late night call-in radio show and introduced the country to Larry King.
King began as a local Florida journalist and radio interviewer in the 1950s and 1960s and gained prominence beginning in 1978 as host of The Larry King Show, an all-night nationwide call-in radio program heard on the Mutual Broadcasting System.

The Adventures of Superman (radio series)

The Adventures of SupermanSupermanradio show
In the golden age of U.S. radio drama, Mutual was best known as the original network home of The Lone Ranger and The Adventures of Superman and as the long-time radio residence of The Shadow.
On Mutual, it was broadcast from August 31, 1942, to February 4, 1949, as a 15-minute serial, running three or, usually, five times a week.

Golden Age of Radio

old-time radioradioold time radio
In the golden age of U.S. radio drama, Mutual was best known as the original network home of The Lone Ranger and The Adventures of Superman and as the long-time radio residence of The Shadow.
Mutual Broadcasting System; 1934. Mutual was initially run as a cooperative in which the flagship stations owned the network, not the other way around as was the case with the Big Three. Mutual was purchased by Westwood One in 1985, which retired the Mutual name in 1999.

Westwood One (1976–2011)

Westwood OneDial Global SportsCBS Radio Sports
Mutual changed hands frequently in succeeding years—even leaving aside larger-scale acquisitions and mergers, its final direct corporate parent, Westwood One, which purchased Mutual in 1985, was the seventh in a string of new owners that followed General Tire.
Due to purchases, mergers and other forms of consolidation in the 1980s and 1990s, at one time or another, it had ownership stakes in or syndication rights to some of the most famous brands in network radio, including CBS, NBC, Mutual, CNN, Fox and Unistar.

Mutual Black Network

SBN
In the early 1970s, acting in much the same style as rival ABC had two years earlier (in 1968), Mutual launched four radio networks: Mutual Black Network (MBN) (initially launched as "Mutual Reports" ), which evolved to today's American Urban Radio Networks (AURN); Mutual Cadena Hispánica (trans.
The Mutual Black Network (MBN) was founded by the Mutual Broadcasting System in 1972 as the first national full-service radio network aimed at African Americans; it was initially branded as Mutual Reports before the branding change to MBN.

NBC

National Broadcasting CompanyNBC-TVNBC Television
The three national radio networks already in operation—the Columbia Broadcasting System and the National Broadcasting Company's NBC Red and NBC Blue—were corporate controlled: programming was produced by the network (or by advertising agencies of program sponsors that purchased airtime on the network) and distributed to affiliates, most of which were independently owned.
In 1934, the Mutual Broadcasting System filed a complaint to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), following the government agency's creation, claiming it ran into difficulties trying to establish new radio stations in a market largely controlled by NBC and the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS).

The Witch's Tale

radio show of the same name
WOR had The Witch's Tale, a horror anthology series whose "hunner-an'-thirteen-year-old" narrator invited listeners to "douse all [the] lights. Now draw up to the fire an' gaze into the embers ...gaaaaze into 'em deep!... an' soon ye'll be across the seas, in th' jungle land of Africa ... hear that chantin' and them savage drums?"
The Witch's Tale was a horror-fantasy radio series which aired from May 21, 1931, to June 13, 1938, on WOR, the Mutual Radio Network, and in syndication.

Mutual Lifestyle Radio

Mutual Progressive Network
"Mutual Spanish Network"); Mutual Southwest Network, and Mutual Progressive Network (was later re-branded "Mutual Lifestyle Radio" in 1980, then cancelled in 1983).
Mutual Lifestyle Radio was a radio network launched by the Mutual Broadcasting System.

WWOR-TV

WOR-TVWWORWOR
Mutual's original participating stations were WOR–Newark, New Jersey, just outside New York (owned by the Bamberger Broadcasting Service, a division of R.H. Macy and Company; in 1949, WOR-TV would begin broadcasting & Bamberger would be renamed General Teleradio, due to General Tire & Rubber's increased investment in the TV station ), WGN–Chicago (owned by WGN Inc., a subsidiary of the Chicago Tribune), WXYZ–Detroit (owned by Kunsky-Trendle Broadcasting), and WLW–Cincinnati (owned by the Crosley Radio Company).
The main impetus for the merger was to give General Tire a controlling share in the Mutual Radio Network, which was affiliated with and partially owned by WOR and other stations.

The Shadow

ShadowShadow ComicsThe Shadow Strikes
In the golden age of U.S. radio drama, Mutual was best known as the original network home of The Lone Ranger and The Adventures of Superman and as the long-time radio residence of The Shadow.
The Shadow returned to network airwaves on September 26, 1937, over the Mutual Broadcasting System.

NBC Radio Network

NBC RadioNBCRed Network
The three national radio networks already in operation—the Columbia Broadcasting System and the National Broadcasting Company's NBC Red and NBC Blue—were corporate controlled: programming was produced by the network (or by advertising agencies of program sponsors that purchased airtime on the network) and distributed to affiliates, most of which were independently owned.
Its major competitors were the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS), founded in 1927, and the Mutual Broadcasting System, founded in 1934.

CKLW

CKLW-AM800 AMAM 800 CKLW
The hole in the Detroit market was immediately filled by CKLW in Windsor, Ontario, just across the river.
CKLW for most of its history had a distinct American accent to its programming, and for a number of years served as the Detroit affiliate of the Mutual Broadcasting System, an affiliation that began with its switch from CBS to Mutual September 29, 1935, and which would last from then until its purchase by RKO General in 1963.

WOR (AM)

WORWOR-AMWOR Radio
Mutual's original participating stations were WOR–Newark, New Jersey, just outside New York (owned by the Bamberger Broadcasting Service, a division of R.H. Macy and Company; in 1949, WOR-TV would begin broadcasting & Bamberger would be renamed General Teleradio, due to General Tire & Rubber's increased investment in the TV station ), WGN–Chicago (owned by WGN Inc., a subsidiary of the Chicago Tribune), WXYZ–Detroit (owned by Kunsky-Trendle Broadcasting), and WLW–Cincinnati (owned by the Crosley Radio Company).
In partnership with Chicago radio station WGN and Cincinnati radio station WLW, WOR formed the Mutual Broadcasting System in 1934 and became its New York City flagship station.

WXYT (AM)

WXYZWXYTWXYT-AM
Mutual's original participating stations were WOR–Newark, New Jersey, just outside New York (owned by the Bamberger Broadcasting Service, a division of R.H. Macy and Company; in 1949, WOR-TV would begin broadcasting & Bamberger would be renamed General Teleradio, due to General Tire & Rubber's increased investment in the TV station ), WGN–Chicago (owned by WGN Inc., a subsidiary of the Chicago Tribune), WXYZ–Detroit (owned by Kunsky-Trendle Broadcasting), and WLW–Cincinnati (owned by the Crosley Radio Company).
In 1934, WXYZ was one of the founding stations of the Mutual Broadcasting System, along with WOR in New York, WGN in Chicago, and WLW in Cincinnati.

Les Misérables (radio series)

Les Misérables1937 radio adaptationadaptation of ''Les Misérables
In July 1937 came the premiere of a seven-part adaptation of Les Misérables, produced, written, and directed by Orson Welles and featuring many of his Mercury Theatre performers—Mercury's first appearance on the air.
Les Misérables is a seven-part radio series broadcast July 23 – September 3, 1937 (Fridays at 10 p.m. ET), on the Mutual Network.

WGN (AM)

WGNWGN RadioWGN-AM
Mutual's original participating stations were WOR–Newark, New Jersey, just outside New York (owned by the Bamberger Broadcasting Service, a division of R.H. Macy and Company; in 1949, WOR-TV would begin broadcasting & Bamberger would be renamed General Teleradio, due to General Tire & Rubber's increased investment in the TV station ), WGN–Chicago (owned by WGN Inc., a subsidiary of the Chicago Tribune), WXYZ–Detroit (owned by Kunsky-Trendle Broadcasting), and WLW–Cincinnati (owned by the Crosley Radio Company).
WGN served as a founding member of the Mutual Broadcasting System.

Flagship (broadcasting)

flagship stationflagshipflagship stations
The network, however, was in the midst of a major expansion: the first outside group of stations to sign on with Mutual was John Shepard's Colonial Network with its Boston flagship station, WAAB, and thirteen affiliates around New England.
Mutual Broadcasting System:

Kay Kyser's Kollege of Musical Knowledge

Kollege of Musical KnowledgeCollege of Musical Knowledge
Mutual also provided the national launching pad for Kay Kyser and his Kollege of Musical Knowledge radio show.
It was broadcast on Mutual, NBC, and ABC beginning on February 1, 1938, and ending on July 29, 1949.

Lum and Abner

WGN contributed the popular comedy series Lum and Abner.
During this period, the show was broadcast on Chicago's WGN (AM), one of the founding members of the Mutual Broadcasting System.

Blue Network

NBC Blue NetworkNBC BlueBlue
The three national radio networks already in operation—the Columbia Broadcasting System and the National Broadcasting Company's NBC Red and NBC Blue—were corporate controlled: programming was produced by the network (or by advertising agencies of program sponsors that purchased airtime on the network) and distributed to affiliates, most of which were independently owned.
In 1938, Mutual had 107 affiliates, and CBS had 114; the Blue Network, by contrast, was not able to blanket the United States when NBC Red sold out its time, with the result that during 1937–1938, the Blue Network's revenues were generally falling, while NBC Red's increased.

Bob Elson

In October, the network began a decades-long run as broadcaster of baseball's World Series, with airtime responsibilities shared between WGN's Bob Elson and Quin Ryan and WLW's Red Barber (NBC and CBS also carried the series that year; the Fall Classic would air on all three networks through 1938).
In 1930, he called his first World Series for the Mutual Broadcasting System, the first of 12 in a row.

Yankee Network

W1XERYankeeYankee Network and Colonial Network
In January 1937, ownership of WAAB was consolidated with that of another Boston station controlled by Shepard: WNAC was flagship of the Yankee Network, a circuit of New England radio stations whose membership partially overlapped with that of Colonial.
Despite John Shepard's affiliation of his Yankee Network stations with CBS, he still became involved in the founding of a new network, which came to be known as the Mutual Broadcasting System, and he served on its board of directors.

The Green Hornet (radio series)

The Green HornetGreen Hornetradio program
In April 1938, the network picked up The Green Hornet from former member WXYZ.
Beginning April 12, 1938, the station supplied the series to the Mutual Broadcasting System radio network, and then to NBC Blue and its successors, the Blue Network and ABC Network, from November 16, 1939, through September 8, 1950.

American Broadcasting Company

ABCABC-TVABC Network
These developments appear to have been of more symbolic than practical value to Mutual—the transfer of the NBC Blue stations to the new American Broadcasting Company did little to help Mutual's competitive position.
In the 1930s, radio in the United States was dominated by three companies: the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS), the Mutual Broadcasting System, and the National Broadcasting Company (NBC).