Mycenaean Greece

MycenaeanMycenaean civilizationMycenaean periodMycenaeansMycenaean GreeksMyceneanMycenaean eraMycenaean civilisationMycenaean cultureMycenaean Greek
Mycenaean Greece (or the Mycenaean civilization) was the last phase of the Bronze Age in Ancient Greece, spanning the period from approximately 1600–1100 BC.wikipedia
789 Related Articles

Ancient Greece

Greekancient Greekancient Greeks
Mycenaean Greece (or the Mycenaean civilization) was the last phase of the Bronze Age in Ancient Greece, spanning the period from approximately 1600–1100 BC.
Roughly three centuries after the Late Bronze Age collapse of Mycenaean Greece, Greek urban poleis began to form in the 8th century BC, ushering in the Archaic period and colonization of the Mediterranean Basin.

Greece

GreekHellenic RepublicGreeks
It represents the first advanced and distinctively Greek civilization in mainland Greece with its palatial states, urban organization, works of art, and writing system.
Greece is home to the first advanced civilizations in Europe and is considered the birthplace of Western civilisation, beginning with the Cycladic civilization on the islands of the Aegean Sea at around 3200 BC, the Minoan civilization in Crete (2700–1500 BC), and then the Mycenaean civilization on the mainland (1600–1100 BC).

Tiryns

TirynthianTirunsTirynthians
Other centers of power that emerged included Pylos, Tiryns, Midea in the Peloponnese, Orchomenos, Thebes, Athens in Central Greece and Iolcos in Thessaly.
Tiryns or (Ancient Greek: Τίρυνς; Modern Greek: Τίρυνθα) is a Mycenaean archaeological site in Argolis in the Peloponnese, and the location from which mythical hero Heracles performed his 12 labors.

Pylos

NavarinoNavarino BayPylians
Other centers of power that emerged included Pylos, Tiryns, Midea in the Peloponnese, Orchomenos, Thebes, Athens in Central Greece and Iolcos in Thessaly.
It was a significant kingdom in Mycenaean Greece, with remains of the so-called "Palace of Nestor" excavated nearby, named after Nestor, the king of Pylos in Homer's Iliad.

Thebes, Greece

ThebesThebanThebans
Other centers of power that emerged included Pylos, Tiryns, Midea in the Peloponnese, Orchomenos, Thebes, Athens in Central Greece and Iolcos in Thessaly.
Archaeological excavations in and around Thebes have revealed a Mycenaean settlement and clay tablets written in the Linear B script, indicating the importance of the site in the Bronze Age.

Mycenae

MyceneansMyceneMycenaean
The most prominent site was Mycenae, in the Argolid, after which the culture of this era is named.
The period of Greek history from about 1600 BC to about 1100 BC is called Mycenaean in reference to Mycenae.

Cyprus

CypriotRepublic of CyprusCYP
Mycenaean and Mycenaean-influenced settlements also appeared in Epirus, Macedonia, on islands in the Aegean Sea, on the coast of Asia Minor, the Levant, Cyprus and Italy. In the early 15th century BC, commerce intensified with Mycenaean pottery reaching the western coast of Asia Minor, including Miletus and Troy, Cyprus, Lebanon, Palestine and Egypt.
Cyprus was settled by Mycenaean Greeks in two waves in the 2nd millennium BC.

Mycenaean religion

their religionMycenaean cultreligion
Their syllabic script, the Linear B, offers the first written records of the Indo-European Greek language and their religion already included several deities that can also be found in the Olympic Pantheon.
The religious element is difficult to identify in Mycenaean Greece (c.

Athens

Athens, GreeceAthenianAthenians
Other centers of power that emerged included Pylos, Tiryns, Midea in the Peloponnese, Orchomenos, Thebes, Athens in Central Greece and Iolcos in Thessaly.
By 1400 BC the settlement had become an important centre of the Mycenaean civilization and the Acropolis was the site of a major Mycenaean fortress, whose remains can be recognised from sections of the characteristic Cyclopean walls.

Greek language

GreekAncient GreekModern Greek
It represents the first advanced and distinctively Greek civilization in mainland Greece with its palatial states, urban organization, works of art, and writing system. Their syllabic script, the Linear B, offers the first written records of the Indo-European Greek language and their religion already included several deities that can also be found in the Olympic Pantheon.

Orchomenus (Boeotia)

OrchomenusOrchomenosOrchomenian
Other centers of power that emerged included Pylos, Tiryns, Midea in the Peloponnese, Orchomenos, Thebes, Athens in Central Greece and Iolcos in Thessaly.
In the Bronze Age, during the fourteenth and thirteenth centuries, Orchomenos became a rich and important centre of civilisation in Mycenaean Greece and a rival to Thebes.

Peloponnese

PeloponnesusPeloponnesianPeloponnesos
Other centers of power that emerged included Pylos, Tiryns, Midea in the Peloponnese, Orchomenos, Thebes, Athens in Central Greece and Iolcos in Thessaly.
The Mycenaean civilization, mainland Greece's (and Europe's) first major civilization, dominated the Peloponnese in the Bronze Age from its stronghold at Mycenae in the north-east of the peninsula.

Linear B

𐃏ambiguous writing systemLinear B script
Their syllabic script, the Linear B, offers the first written records of the Indo-European Greek language and their religion already included several deities that can also be found in the Olympic Pantheon.
Linear B, found mainly in the palace archives at Knossos, Cydonia, Pylos, Thebes and Mycenae, disappeared with the fall of Mycenaean civilization during the Late Bronze Age collapse.

Italy

ItalianITAItalia
Mycenaean and Mycenaean-influenced settlements also appeared in Epirus, Macedonia, on islands in the Aegean Sea, on the coast of Asia Minor, the Levant, Cyprus and Italy.
Between the 17th and the 11th centuries BC Mycenaean Greeks established contacts with Italy and in the 8th and 7th centuries BC a number of Greek colonies were established all along the coast of Sicily and the southern part of the Italian Peninsula, that became known as Magna Graecia.

Thessaly

ThessalianThessaliaThessalians
Other centers of power that emerged included Pylos, Tiryns, Midea in the Peloponnese, Orchomenos, Thebes, Athens in Central Greece and Iolcos in Thessaly.
Mycenaean settlements have also been discovered, for example at the sites of Iolcos, Dimini and Sesklo (near Volos).

Dorian invasion

Return of the HeracleidaeDorian migrationDorian and Heraclidae invasion
Various theories have been proposed for the end of this civilization, among them the Dorian invasion or activities connected to the "Sea Peoples".
The meaning of the phrase "Dorian invasion" as an explanation for the cultural and economic breakdown after the Mycenaean period has become to some degree amorphous.

Epirus

Epirus NovaEpirus VetusEpirote
Mycenaean and Mycenaean-influenced settlements also appeared in Epirus, Macedonia, on islands in the Aegean Sea, on the coast of Asia Minor, the Levant, Cyprus and Italy.
These people buried their leaders in large tumuli containing shaft graves, similar to the Mycenaean tombs, indicating an ancestral link between Epirus and the Mycenaean civilization.

Regions of ancient Greece

ancient AtticaArgolisancient Argolis
The most prominent site was Mycenae, in the Argolid, after which the culture of this era is named.
Most of these regions are directly named in the "catalogue of ships" in the Iliad, suggesting that this geographic division of the Peloponnese is very ancient, and stretches back to Mycenaean Greece.

Trojan War

Fall of TroySiege of TroyTroy
Various collective terms for the inhabitants of Mycenaean Greece were used by Homer in his 8th century BC epic, the Iliad, in reference to the Trojan War.
Many scholars believe that there is a historical core to the tale, though this may simply mean that the Homeric stories are a fusion of various tales of sieges and expeditions by Mycenaean Greeks during the Bronze Age.

Crete

CretanCretansCreta
During this period, the Mycenaean centers witnessed increased contacts with the outside world and especially with the Cyclades and the Minoan centers in the island of Crete.
Crete was the centre of Europe's first advanced civilization, the Minoans, from 2700 to 1420 BC; the Minoan civilization was overrun by the Mycenaean civilization from mainland Greece.

Achaeans (Homer)

AchaeansAchaeanAhhiyawa
In the official records of another Bronze Age empire, that of the Hittites in Anatolia, various references from c. 1400 BC to 1220 BC mention a country named Ahhiyawa.
The Homeric "long-haired Achaeans" would have been a part of the Mycenaean civilization that dominated Greece from circa 1600 BC until 1100 BC.

Greek Dark Ages

Greek Dark AgeDark AgeDark Ages
Mycenaean Greece perished with the collapse of Bronze Age culture in the eastern Mediterranean, to be followed by the so-called Greek Dark Ages, a recordless transitional period leading to Archaic Greece where significant shifts occurred from palace-centralized to de-centralized forms of socio-economic organization (including the extensive use of iron).
The Mycenaean civilization started to collapse from 1200 BC.

Mycenaean pottery

Mycenaeandistinct potteryMycenaean vase
In the early 15th century BC, commerce intensified with Mycenaean pottery reaching the western coast of Asia Minor, including Miletus and Troy, Cyprus, Lebanon, Palestine and Egypt.
Mycenaean pottery is an assemblage of terra cotta ceramics and ceramic styles originated, manufactured, or heavily used by the civilization termed Mycenaean in Greek history and prehistory.

Mycenology

modern Mycenologists
Notwithstanding the above academic disputes, the mainstream consensus among modern Mycenologists is that Mycenaean civilization, exemplified in the Shaft Graves, originated and evolved from the local socio-cultural landscape of the Early and Middle Bronze Age in mainland Greece with influences from Minoan Crete.
Mycenology is the study of the Mycenaean Greek language and the culture and institutions recorded in that language.

Bronze Age

Late Bronze AgeEarly Bronze AgeBronze
Mycenaean Greece (or the Mycenaean civilization) was the last phase of the Bronze Age in Ancient Greece, spanning the period from approximately 1600–1100 BC.
At the end of the Bronze Age in the Aegean region, the Mycenaean administration of the regional trade empire followed the decline of Minoan primacy.