Mysia

Coin of Kyzikos, Mysia. Circa 550–500 BC
Coin of Mysia, 4th century BC
Coin of Orontes as Satrap of Mysia, Adramyteion – c. undefined 357–352 BC
Coinage of Memnon of Rhodes, Mysia. Mid-4th century BC

Region in the northwest of ancient Asia Minor (Anatolia, Asian part of modern Turkey).

- Mysia
Coin of Kyzikos, Mysia. Circa 550–500 BC

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Pergamon

Ruins of the ancient city of Pergamon
City wall
Mithridates VI, portrait in the Louvre
Pergamon in the Roman province of Asia, 90 BC
Founding of Pergamon: depiction from the Telephos frieze of the Pergamon altar
Christian Wilberg: Excavation area of the Pergamon Altar. 1879 sketch.
The lower agora in 1902, during excavations
Roman bridge of Pergamon
The Great Altar of Pergamon, on display in the Pergamon Museum in Berlin, Germany
Foundations of the Pergamon altar.
Theatre of Pergamon, one of the steepest theatres in the world, has a capacity of 10,000 people and was constructed in the 3rd century BC.
The Trajaneum
Sanctuary of Dionysus at the north end of the theatre terrace
Temple of Athena
Reconstructed view of the Pergamon Acropolis, Friedrich Thierch, 1882
Gymnasium area near Upper Terrace
Temple and sanctuary of Hera from the west
Sanctuary of Demeter from the east
View of Acropolis from the Sanctuary of Asclepius
The Red Basilica
Possible coinage of the Greek ruler Gongylos, wearing the Persian cap on the reverse, as ruler of Pergamon for the Achaemenid Empire. Pergamon, Mysia, circa 450 BC. The name of the city ΠΕΡΓ ("PERG"), appears for the first on this coinage, and is the first evidence for the name of the city.<ref name="RD">{{cite book |last1=Dreyfus |first1=Renée |title=Pergamon: The Telephos Friez from the Great Altar; [exhibition, The Metrolopitan Museum of Art, New York, N. Y., 16 January - 14 April 1996...] |date=1996 |publisher=University of Texas Press |isbn=9780884010890 |page=104 |url=https://books.google.com/books?id=HdiF2H5C2m0C&pg=PA104 |language=en}}</ref>
Coin of Orontes, Achaemenid Satrap of Mysia (including Pergamon), Adramyteion. Circa 357-352 BC
Image of Philetaerus on a coin of Eumenes I
The Kingdom of Pergamon, shown at its greatest extent in 188 BC
Over-life-size portrait head, probably of Attalus I, from early in the reign of Eumenes II
A model of the acropolis of Pergamon, showing the situation in the 2nd century CE

Pergamon or Pergamum ( or ; ), also referred to by its modern Greek form Pergamos (Πέργαμος), was a rich and powerful ancient Greek city in Mysia.

Bas relief of a charioteer, late 6th century BC

Cyzicus

Bas relief of a charioteer, late 6th century BC
Marble, 2nd quarter of the 2nd century BC. From Cyzicus
Cyzicus ruins in Turkey
Coin of Kyzikos, Mysia. Circa 550–500 BC
Coin of Cyzicus, minted in the Achaemenid Persian Empire. Obv: bearded Persian archer, testing arrow held in right hand, left hand holding bow, seated on a tunny. Rev: Quadripartite incuse square. According to some numismatists, the archer may represent Pharnabazus II. The representation of the archer later became the canonical form used on the drachms of the Parthian Empire
Electrum stater of Cyzicus, mid 4th century BC. On the obverse is a possible portrait of Timotheos, wearing a victory wreath, with a tuna fish below.
Cyzicus amphitheatre
Cyzicus was a town of Mysia.

Cyzicus ( Kúzikos;, Aydıncıḳ) was an ancient Greek town in Mysia in Anatolia in the current Balıkesir Province of Turkey.

Pergamon in 188 BC

Kingdom of Pergamon

Greek state during the Hellenistic period that ruled much of the Western part of Asia Minor from its capital city of Pergamon.

Greek state during the Hellenistic period that ruled much of the Western part of Asia Minor from its capital city of Pergamon.

Pergamon in 188 BC
Theatre of Pergamon, one of the steepest theatres in the world, has a capacity of 10,000 people and was constructed in the 3rd century BC.
Pergamon in 188 BC
Ruins of the ancient city of Pergamon
Territory after the death of Lysimachus in 281 BC. Philetaerus holds just the city of Pergamon and its immediate environs.
Pergamon's territory in 200 BC, before the outbreak of war with the Seleucids.
Pergamon's expansion after Roman victory in the Roman–Seleucid War. Rome was eager to weaken the Seleucids by awarding territory to the weaker and Roman-allied Pergamon.

He contributed troops, money and food to the city of Cyzicus, in Mysia, for its defence against the invading Gauls, thus gaining prestige and goodwill for him and his family.

Land of the Mysians, who were at the origin of the historic name of the region (Mysia) in northwest Anatolia

Mysians

Land of the Mysians, who were at the origin of the historic name of the region (Mysia) in northwest Anatolia

Mysians (Mysi;, Mysoí) were the inhabitants of Mysia, a region in northwestern Asia Minor.

Map of the Lydian Kingdom in its final period of sovereignty under Croesus, c. 547 BC.

Lydia

Iron Age kingdom of western Asia Minor located generally east of ancient Ionia in the modern western Turkish provinces of Uşak, Manisa and inland Izmir.

Iron Age kingdom of western Asia Minor located generally east of ancient Ionia in the modern western Turkish provinces of Uşak, Manisa and inland Izmir.

Map of the Lydian Kingdom in its final period of sovereignty under Croesus, c. 547 BC.
The temple of Artemis in Sardis.
Sardis Synagogue.
Portrait of Croesus, last King of Lydia, Attic red-figure amphora, painted ca. 500–490 BC.
Tripolis on the Meander is an ancient Lydian city in Turkey.
Tripolis on the Meander is an ancient Lydian city in Turkey.
Büyük Menderes River also known as Maeander is river in Lydia.
The Pactolus river, from which Lydia obtained electrum, a combination of silver and gold.
Early 6th century BC Lydian electrum coin (one-third stater denomination).
Gyges tablet, British Museum
Lydian delegation at Apadana, circa 500 BC
Lydia's borders under the reign of Alyattes's son Croesus
Bin Tepe royal funeral tumulus (tomb of Alyattes, father of Croesus), Lydia, 6th century BC.
Tomb of Alyattes.
Croesus at the stake. Side A from an Attic red-figure amphora, ca. 500–490 BC
Lydia, including Ionia, during the Achaemenid Empire.
Xerxes I tomb, Lydian soldier of the Achaemenid army, circa 480 BC
Roman province of Asia
Photo of a 15th-century map showing Lydia
Church of St John, Philadelphia (Alaşehir)

It was bounded first by Mysia, Caria, Phrygia and coastal Ionia.

A map of the Troad (Troas).

Troad

Historical region in northwestern Anatolia.

Historical region in northwestern Anatolia.

A map of the Troad (Troas).
Troas among the classical regions of Anatolia.

The Attalid kings of Pergamon (now Bergama) later ceded Mysia, including the territory of the Troad, to the Roman Republic, on the death of King Attalus III in 133 B.C.Under the Roman Empire, the territory of the Troad became part of the province of Asia, and later of the smaller Mysian province Hellespontus; it was important enough to have suffragan bishoprics, including Pionia (now Avcılar).

Location of Phrygia in Anatolia

Phrygia

Kingdom in the west central part of Anatolia, in what is now Asian Turkey, centered on the Sangarios River.

Kingdom in the west central part of Anatolia, in what is now Asian Turkey, centered on the Sangarios River.

Location of Phrygia in Anatolia
Gordion archeological site
Zeus Temple in ancient city of Aizanoi belongs to Phrygia. It is a UNESCO World Heritage Site
Theatre complex of Aizanoi in Phrygia
Phrygian soldiers. Detail from a reconstruction of a Phrygian building at Pararli, Turkey, 7th–6th centuries BC.
Ruins of the Lycus
Horseman and griffin, Phrygia, 600–550 BC.
Detail from a reconstruction of a Phrygian building at Pararli, Turkey, 7th–6th centuries BC: Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, Ankara. A griffin, sphinx and two centaurs are shown.
Tomb at Midas City (6th century BC), near Eskişehir
The location of Hellespontine Phrygia, and the provincial capital of Dascylium, in the Achaemenid Empire, c. 500 BC.
The two Phrygian provinces within the Diocese of Asia, c. 400 AD.
The Flaying of Marsyas by Titian, 1570s, with King Midas at right, and the man with a knife in a Phrygian cap
The Polyxena sarcophagus in Çanakkale Archaeological Museum, Turkey.
The Midas Mound Tumulus at Gordion, dated ca. 740 BCE.
Man in Phrygian costume, Hellenistic period (3rd–1st century BC), Cyprus

Some classical writers also connected the Phrygians with the Mygdones, the name of two groups of people, one of which lived in northern Macedonia and another in Mysia.

Macedonian gold stater, Abydos mint. 323–317 or 297 BC.

Abydos (Hellespont)

Macedonian gold stater, Abydos mint. 323–317 or 297 BC.
The environs of Abydos in Antiquity
Coinage of Abydos around the time of the Persian Wars. ABYΔ-[H]NON, eagle standing left / Facing gorgoneion with protruding tongue, within incuse square. Circa 500-480 BC
Hellenistic tetradrachm of Abydos, with the legend ΑΒΥΔΗΝΩΝ ("of the Abydenes")
View of the straits at Abydos.

Abydos (, Abydus) was an ancient city and bishopric in Mysia.

The province of Asia highlighted within the Roman Empire.

Asia (Roman province)

Administrative unit added to the late Republic.

Administrative unit added to the late Republic.

The province of Asia highlighted within the Roman Empire.
The Roman provinces of Anatolia under Trajan, including Asia.
The Roman empire in the time of Hadrian (ruled 117-138 AD), showing, in western Anatolia, the senatorial province of Asia (southwestern Turkey).
The Roman conquest of Asia minor.

The province of Asia originally consisted of the territories of Mysia, the Troad, Aeolis, Lydia, Ionia, Caria, and the land corridor through Pisidia to Pamphylia.

A 15th-century map showing Bithynia.

Bithynia

Ancient region, kingdom and Roman province in the northwest of Asia Minor (present-day Turkey), adjoining the Sea of Marmara, the Bosporus, and the Black Sea.

Ancient region, kingdom and Roman province in the northwest of Asia Minor (present-day Turkey), adjoining the Sea of Marmara, the Bosporus, and the Black Sea.

A 15th-century map showing Bithynia.

It bordered Mysia to the southwest, Paphlagonia to the northeast along the Pontic coast, and Phrygia to the southeast towards the interior of Asia Minor.