NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt

AIDS Memorial QuiltAIDS quiltNAMES ProjectAIDS quilt memorial projectAustralian Aids QuiltDisplay of Names ProjectNames Project Memorial QuiltNAMES Project, Chicago chapterProject AIDS Memorial Quiltquilt project to memorialize people who had died from AIDS
The NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt, often abbreviated to AIDS Memorial Quilt or AIDS Quilt, is an enormous memorial to celebrate the lives of people who have died of AIDS-related causes.wikipedia
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Cleve Jones

Jones, Cleve
The idea for the NAMES Project Memorial Quilt was conceived in 1985 by AIDS activist Cleve Jones during the candlelight march, in remembrance of the 1978 assassinations of San Francisco Supervisor Harvey Milk and Mayor George Moscone.
He conceived the NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt which has become, at 54 tons, the world's largest piece of community folk art as of 2016.

Smithsonian Folklife Festival

Folklife FestivalSmithsonian Festival of American FolklifeFestival of American Folklife
The panels are made by individuals alone or in a workshop, such as Call My Name (which focuses on African American representation on the quilt) or in quilting bees, such as the one held during the 2012 Smithsonian Folklife Festival on the National Mall.

Common Threads: Stories from the Quilt

Common Threads: Stories from the Quilt is a 1989 documentary film that tells the story of the NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt.

Elegies for Angels, Punks and Raging Queens

I Do not Know How To Help You
The work features songs and monologues inspired by the NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt and Edgar Lee Masters' Spoon River Anthology.

50 United Nations Plaza Federal Office Building (San Francisco)

San Francisco Federal Building50 United Nations PlazaFederal Building
For the march, Jones had people write the names of loved ones that were lost to AIDS-related causes on signs, and then they taped the signs to the old San Francisco Federal Building.
The signs taped to the building looked like a patchwork quilt to Jones, and he was inspired to start the NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt with several collaborators.

NAMES Project AIDS Quilt Songbook

AIDS Quilt SongbookThe AIDS Quilt Songbook
The AIDS Quilt Songbook is an ongoing collaborative song-cycle with subsequent additions responding to the stigma surrounding, ignorance of, and grief caused by the spread of HIV/AIDS, serving as a companion work to the NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt.

Art of the AIDS Crisis

Art of the 1980s AIDS Crisis
One example would be the NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt, a large quilt containing thousands of panels that commemorate those living with or those who have died of AIDS.

Donelan (cartoonist)

DonelanGerard Donelan
He did this work for the NAMES Project, which worked to honor victims of AIDS and AIDS-related diseases in an enormous patchwork quilt.

AIDS Memorial Grove

National AIDS Memorial GroveGrove
In November of 2019 the NAMES Project Foundation and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced that the quilt will be on permanent display at the National AIDS Memorial Grove starting in 2020.
2019*(November) The NAMES Project Foundation and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announce that the AIDS Memorial Quilt will be on permanent display at the Grove starting in 2020.

One Life to Live

MendorraKelley MissalBo and Nora Buchanan
The story arc also included an on-air ceremony for the NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt.

Southern AIDS Living Quilt

The Southern AIDS Living Quilt is a separate initiative from the NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt.

HIV/AIDS

AIDSHIVacquired immune deficiency syndrome
The NAMES Project AIDS Memorial Quilt, often abbreviated to AIDS Memorial Quilt or AIDS Quilt, is an enormous memorial to celebrate the lives of people who have died of AIDS-related causes.

Community arts

community artcommunitycommunity artist
Weighing an estimated 54 tons, it is the largest piece of community folk art in the world as of 2016.

Moscone–Milk assassinations

assassinatedassassinations1978 assassinations
The idea for the NAMES Project Memorial Quilt was conceived in 1985 by AIDS activist Cleve Jones during the candlelight march, in remembrance of the 1978 assassinations of San Francisco Supervisor Harvey Milk and Mayor George Moscone.

Harvey Milk

Harvey Milk ClubHarvey Milk PlazaMilk
The idea for the NAMES Project Memorial Quilt was conceived in 1985 by AIDS activist Cleve Jones during the candlelight march, in remembrance of the 1978 assassinations of San Francisco Supervisor Harvey Milk and Mayor George Moscone.

George Moscone

George R. MosconeMoscone
The idea for the NAMES Project Memorial Quilt was conceived in 1985 by AIDS activist Cleve Jones during the candlelight march, in remembrance of the 1978 assassinations of San Francisco Supervisor Harvey Milk and Mayor George Moscone.

San Francisco

San Francisco, CaliforniaSan Francisco, CACity and County of San Francisco
It officially started in 1987 in San Francisco by Jones, Mike Smith, and volunteers Joseph Durant, Jack Caster, Gert McMullin, Ron Cordova, Larkin Mayo, Steve Kirchner, and Gary Yuschalk.

National Mall

the MallMallThe National Mall
The Quilt was last displayed in full on the Mall in Washington, D.C., in 1996, a display that included a visit by President Bill Clinton and first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, but it returned in July 2012 to coincide with the start of the XIX International AIDS Conference, 2012.

Washington, D.C.

Washington, DCWashington D.C.District of Columbia
The Quilt was last displayed in full on the Mall in Washington, D.C., in 1996, a display that included a visit by President Bill Clinton and first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, but it returned in July 2012 to coincide with the start of the XIX International AIDS Conference, 2012.

Bill Clinton

ClintonPresident ClintonPresident Bill Clinton
The Quilt was last displayed in full on the Mall in Washington, D.C., in 1996, a display that included a visit by President Bill Clinton and first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, but it returned in July 2012 to coincide with the start of the XIX International AIDS Conference, 2012.

Hillary Clinton

ClintonHillary Rodham ClintonHillary
The Quilt was last displayed in full on the Mall in Washington, D.C., in 1996, a display that included a visit by President Bill Clinton and first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, but it returned in July 2012 to coincide with the start of the XIX International AIDS Conference, 2012.

XIX International AIDS Conference, 2012

2012 International AIDS ConferenceXIX International AIDS Conference
The Quilt was last displayed in full on the Mall in Washington, D.C., in 1996, a display that included a visit by President Bill Clinton and first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, but it returned in July 2012 to coincide with the start of the XIX International AIDS Conference, 2012.

Epidemiology of HIV/AIDS

AIDS epidemicAIDS pandemicHIV/AIDS epidemic
The Quilt is a memorial to and celebration of the lives of people lost to the AIDS pandemic.

Motif (textile arts)

motifsmotifquilt block
In observance of National HIV-Testing Day in June 2004 the 1,000 newest blocks were displayed by the Foundation on The Ellipse in Washington, D.C. The largest display of The Quilt since it was last displayed in its entirety in October 1996, the 1,000 blocks displayed consisted of every panel submitted at or after the 1996 display.