Nagarvadhu

Nagarvadhu or Nagar Vadhu (Devanagari: नगरवधू) ("bride of the city") was a tradition followed in some parts of ancient India.wikipedia
23 Related Articles

Amrapali

AmbapaliAmbapālīAmbipure
Āmrapālī, also known as "Ambapālika", "Ambapali", or "Amra" was a celebrated nagarvadhu (royal courtesan) of the republic of Vaishali (located in present-day Bihar) in ancient India around 500 BC.

Mṛcchakatika

MrichakatikaMricchakatikaThe Little Clay Cart
The central story is that of a noble but impoverished young Brahmin, Cārudatta, who falls in love with a wealthy courtesan or nagarvadhu, Vasantasenā.

Devadasi

DevdasiDevadasisdevadasi system
The first known mention of Devadasi is to a girl named Amrapali who was declared nagarvadhu by the king during the time of the Buddha.

Courtesan

courtesanscourtisanCourtisane
A Nagarvadhu was respected like a queen or Goddess, but she was a courtesan; people could watch her dance and sing.

Devanagari

DevanāgarīDevanagari scriptDevnagari
Nagarvadhu or Nagar Vadhu (Devanagari: नगरवधू) ("bride of the city") was a tradition followed in some parts of ancient India.

History of India

ancient IndiaIndiaIndian history
Nagarvadhu or Nagar Vadhu (Devanagari: नगरवधू) ("bride of the city") was a tradition followed in some parts of ancient India.

Indian classical dance

classical Indian danceclassical dancedance
The most beautiful and talented (in various dance forms) woman was chosen as the Nagarvadhu.

Lord

lordshipseigneurseigneurs
A Nagarvadhu's price for a single night's dance was very high, and she was only within the reach of the very rich – the king, the princes, and the lords.

Ca trù

Ca Trù singingca truhát nói

Geisha

Kisaeng

gisaengcaste of the womencourtesan

Vyjayanthimala Bali

VyjayanthimalaVyjayantimalaVyjanthimala
She later achieved critical acclaim for her performance in the historical drama Amrapali, which was based on the life of Nagarvadhu, royal courtesan of Vaishali, Amrapali.

Hooker with a heart of gold

tart with a heartwhore with a heart of goldprostitute with a heart of gold
The stereotype might owe something of a debt to certain traditions surrounding the Biblical figures of Mary Magdalene (who was not a prostitute) and Rahab, or to the ancient Indian theatrical tradition of Sanskrit drama where Śudraka's play Mṛcchakatika (The Little Clay Cart) featured a nagarvadhu (courtesan) with a heart of gold named Vasantasena.

Amrapali (film)

AmrapaliAmarpali
It was based on the life of Amrapali (Ambapali), the nagarvadhu (royal courtesan) of Vaishali in present-day Bihar, the capital of the Licchavi republic in ancient India around 500 BC and Ajatashatru, the Haryanka dynasty king of the Magadha empire, who falls in love with her.

List of prostitutes and courtesans

List of famous prostitutes and courtesansList of sex workers in literatureProstitutes and courtesans

Indian classical drama

Sanskrit dramaSanskrit theatreSanskrit play
The main story is about a young man named Charudatta, and his love for Vasantasena, a rich courtesan or nagarvadhu.

Prostitution in India

Child prostitutionIndiatrafficked to India
Amrapali (Ambapali) the nagarvadhu of the Kingdom of Vaishali famously became a Buddhist monk later in the life, a story retold in a Hindi film, Amprapali (1966).