Namaste

Anjali mudraAñjali MudrāNamaskarfolded handsNamaskaranamastéanjaliNamoPranamasanaanjili pose
Namaste (, Devanagari: नमस्ते, ), sometimes spoken as Namaskar and Namaskaram, is a customary Hindu greeting.wikipedia
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Clitic

encliticprocliticenclitics
Namaste (Namah + te, Devanagari: नम:+ ते = नमस्ते) is derived from Sanskrit and is a combination of the word namah and the second person dative pronoun in its enclitic form, te.

Hindu temple

MandirHindu templestemple
It is also found in numerous ancient and medieval era sculpture and mandapa relief artwork in Hindu temples.
When inside the temple, devotees keep both hands folded (namaste mudra).

Thailand

ThaiSiamTHA
It is used as a sign of respect and a greeting in India, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bhutan, Burma, Thailand, Laos, Cambodia and Indonesia, also used among East Asian Buddhists, Taoists and Shintoists and amongst yoga practitioners and adherents of similar traditions.
The wai is a sign of respect and reverence for another, similar to the namaste greeting of India and Nepal.

Mālāsana

Malasanathat name
In the West, the term malasana is also used for the "regular squat pose", also called upavesasana, in which the hand palms are folded together in the so-called namaskar mudra in front of the chest, and the feet are set wider apart.

Surya Namaskār

Surya NamaskarSurya Namaskarasun salutation
One such sequence consists of Tadasana, Urdhva Hastasana, Anjaneyasana (sometimes called Half Moon Pose), a kneeling lunge, Adho Mukha Svanasana, Bitilasana, Balasana, kneeling with thighs, body, and arms pointing straight up, Balasana with elbows on ground, hands together in Anjali Mudra behind the head, Urdhva Mukha Svanasana, Adho Mukha Svanasana, Uttanasana, Urdhva Hastasana, Pranamasana, and Tadasana.

Thai greeting

waiSawasdee
It has its origin in the Indian Añjali Mudrā, like the Indian namaste and Burmese Mingalar Par.

Pranāma

pranamApology hand gesturepranama
Namaste is one of the six forms of pranama, and in parts of India these terms are used synonymously.

Tadasana

Urdhva HastasanaIndudalasanaTāḍāsana
Namaskarasana, Pranamasana, or Prayer Pose has the hands in prayer position (Anjali mudra) in front of the chest.

Culture of India

Indian cultureIndianculture
Indian greetings are based on Añjali Mudrā, including Pranāma and Puja.

Puja (Hinduism)

pujapoojapujas
Namaskar is also part of the 16 upacharas used inside temples or any place of formal Puja (worship).

Sampeah

Both Sampeah and Thai wai are based on the Indian Añjali Mudrā used in namasté.

Vriksasana

VrikshasanaTreeTree Pose
Hands are typically held above the head either pointed directly upwards and unclasped, or clasped together in anjali mudra.

Hanumanasana

The hands may then be placed in prayer position (Anjali Mudra).

Upachara

upacharas
Namaskar is also part of the 16 upacharas used inside temples or any place of formal Puja (worship).

Utkatasana

UtkaṭāsanaChairChair pose
The arms are usually raised with the elbows bent; variants have the arms straight up, or the hands may be held in Añjali Mudrā, prayer position in front of the chest.

Devanagari

DevanāgarīDevanagari scriptDevnagari
Namaste (Namah + te, Devanagari: नम:+ ते = नमस्ते) is derived from Sanskrit and is a combination of the word namah and the second person dative pronoun in its enclitic form, te. Namaste (, Devanagari: नमस्ते,

Hindus

HinduShrimantHindoos
), sometimes spoken as Namaskar and Namaskaram, is a customary Hindu greeting.

Southeast Asia

South East AsiaSouth-East AsiaSoutheast Asian
In the contemporary era, it is found on the Indian subcontinent, Southeast Asia and among the Hindu diaspora worldwide.

Diaspora

diasporicdiasporasDiasporism
In the contemporary era, it is found on the Indian subcontinent, Southeast Asia and among the Hindu diaspora worldwide.

Sanskrit

Sanskrit languageClassical SanskritSkt.
Namaste (Namah + te, Devanagari: नम:+ ते = नमस्ते) is derived from Sanskrit and is a combination of the word namah and the second person dative pronoun in its enclitic form, te.

Sanskrit pronouns and determiners

te
Namaste (Namah + te, Devanagari: नम:+ ते = नमस्ते) is derived from Sanskrit and is a combination of the word namah and the second person dative pronoun in its enclitic form, te.

Sandhi

internal sandhiliaisonacross word and morpheme
The word namaḥ takes the sandhi form namas before the sound te.

Rigveda

Rig VedaRigvedicRig-Veda
Namas-krita and related terms appear in the Hindu scripture Rigveda such as in the Vivaha Sukta, verse 10.85.22 in the sense of "worship, adore", while Namaskara appears in the sense of "exclamatory adoration, homage, salutation and worship" in the Atharvaveda, the Taittiriya Samhita, and the Aitareya Brahmana.

Atharvaveda

Atharva VedaAtharva-VedaAtharva
Namas-krita and related terms appear in the Hindu scripture Rigveda such as in the Vivaha Sukta, verse 10.85.22 in the sense of "worship, adore", while Namaskara appears in the sense of "exclamatory adoration, homage, salutation and worship" in the Atharvaveda, the Taittiriya Samhita, and the Aitareya Brahmana.