Namayan

Kingdom of NamayanQueen of NamayanKingdom of SapaLakan Tagkanpre-Hispanic kingdomRajah Kalamayin
Namayan (Baybayin: Pre-Kudlit: or (Sapa), Post-Kudlit: ), also called Sapa, Maysapan or Nasapan, and sometimes Lamayan, was one of three independent polities that dominated the banks of the Pasig River in the Philippines during the 16th century, just prior to the Spanish colonization of the Philippines.wikipedia
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Maynila (historical polity)

Kingdom of MaynilaMaynilaRajahnate of Maynila
Archeological findings in Santa Ana, Namayan's former seat of power, have produced the oldest evidence of continuous habitation among the three polities, pre-dating artifacts found within the historical sites of Maynila and Tondo.
Primary sources for the history of Rajah Kalamayin's Namayan, further upriver, include artifacts dug up from archaeological digs (the earliest of which was Robert Fox’s work for the National Museum in 1977) and Spanish colonial records (most notably those compiled by the 19th century Franciscan Historian Fray Felix Huerta).

Tondo (historical polity)

TondoKingdom of TondoTondo Dynasty
Archeological findings in Santa Ana, Namayan's former seat of power, have produced the oldest evidence of continuous habitation among the three polities, pre-dating artifacts found within the historical sites of Maynila and Tondo.
Primary sources for the history of Rajah Kalamayin's Namayan, further upriver, include artifacts dug up from archaeological digs (the earliest of which was Robert Fox's work for the National Museum in 1977) and Spanish colonial records (most notably those compiled by the 19th century Franciscan Historian Fray Felix Huerta).

Santa Ana, Manila

Santa AnaSta. AnaSanta Ana de Sapa
Two of these are within today's Santa Ana, Manila, and the other is now a barangay of the Mandaluyong City across the river from the other sites.
Santa Ana was at the centre of the ancient polity of Namayan.

Pasig River

River PasigPasig
Namayan (Baybayin: Pre-Kudlit: or (Sapa), Post-Kudlit: ), also called Sapa, Maysapan or Nasapan, and sometimes Lamayan, was one of three independent polities that dominated the banks of the Pasig River in the Philippines during the 16th century, just prior to the Spanish colonization of the Philippines.
Some of the most prominent kingdoms in early Philippine history, including the kingdoms of Namayan, Maynila, and Tondo grew up along the banks of the river, drawing their life and source of wealth from it.

Namayan, Mandaluyong

Namayan
A third location, Barangay Namayan in the City of Mandaluyong bears the name of the kingdom, and was clearly part of its ancient territory, located as it is on the banks of the Pasig just opposite of Lamayan.
Namayan was the center of a pre-Hispanic kingdom that covered much of the modern city of Manila and surrounding cities in southern and eastern Metro Manila.

Makati

Makati CityMakati, PhilippinesMakati City, Philippines
Parts of the city were once subject to the pre-Hispanic Kingdom of Namayan, whose capital is now in the Santa Ana district of Manila.

San Juan, Metro Manila

San JuanSan Juan CitySan Juan del Monte
During the pre-Hispanic period, the area of what is now San Juan was a part of the Kingdom of Namayan, whose last recorded rulers were King Lacantagean and his consort, Bouan.

Mandaluyong

Mandaluyong CitySan Felipe NeriMandaluyong, Metro Manila
Two of these are within today's Santa Ana, Manila, and the other is now a barangay of the Mandaluyong City across the river from the other sites.
These industrious people trace their roots to Emperor Soledan (also known as “Anka Widyaya” of the Great Madjapahit Empire) and Empress Sasaban of the Kingdom of Sapa whose son Prince Balagtas ruled as sovereign of the kingdom in about the year 1300.

Taytay, Rizal

TaytaySan Juan CityTaytay, Rizal, Calabarzon, Philippines
Taytay was a settlement situated along the coastline of the eastern side of Laguna de Bay that formed part of the Kingdom of Namayan, also known as the Kingdom of "Sapa", which was ruled by Lakan Tagkan.

Santa Ana Church

Nuestra Señora de los Desamparados ChurchNuestra Señora de los DesamparadosOur Lady of the Abandoned
The site most associated with the kingdom is the town proper of Santa Ana, which grew around the Our Lady of the Abandoned Parish.
The bulk of data gathered regarding the pre-Hispanic culture of Santa Ana (known as the ancient settlement of Namayan ) led to the construction of a site museum in the patio, which was later declared as a National Cultural Treasure on August 1973 by the virtue of Presidential Decree No.

Piloncitos

gold
The Namayans, like Tondo, used Piloncitos, small gold ingots some of the size of a corn kernel—and weighing from 0.09 to 2.65 grams.
Piloncitos are the earliest form of precious metal based currency of Tondo, Namayan and Rajahnate of Butuan in present-day Philippines.

Old Tagalog

Archaic TagalogClassical Tagalog
It is the language of Tondo, Namayan, state of Ma-i, Rajahnate of Maynila, and other regions of the northern Philippines.

Dayang Kalangitan

KalangitanQueen Kalangitan
In order to maintain power and influence as queen, Kalangitan assented to the marriage of one of her daughters, Dayang Panginoan, to Prince Balagtas, the son of Empress Sasaban of Namayan.

Empress Sasaban

Sasaban
In oral traditions associated with the early history of the Tagalog people, Empress Sasaban or Dayang Sasaban (Baybayin: ᜐᜐᜊᜈ᜔, Javanese: ꦱꦼꦒꦮꦺꦴꦤ꧀) is said to have been a 14th Century noblewoman (Dayang) of the Tagalog polity of Namayan, on the shores of the Pasig River in Luzon.

Baybayin

TagalogBaybayin scriptTagalog script
Namayan (Baybayin: Pre-Kudlit: or (Sapa), Post-Kudlit: ), also called Sapa, Maysapan or Nasapan, and sometimes Lamayan, was one of three independent polities that dominated the banks of the Pasig River in the Philippines during the 16th century, just prior to the Spanish colonization of the Philippines.

Philippines

FilipinoPhilippinePhilippine Islands
Namayan (Baybayin: Pre-Kudlit: or (Sapa), Post-Kudlit: ), also called Sapa, Maysapan or Nasapan, and sometimes Lamayan, was one of three independent polities that dominated the banks of the Pasig River in the Philippines during the 16th century, just prior to the Spanish colonization of the Philippines.

History of the Philippines (1521–1898)

Spanish colonial periodSpanish colonial eraSpanish Era
Namayan (Baybayin: Pre-Kudlit: or (Sapa), Post-Kudlit: ), also called Sapa, Maysapan or Nasapan, and sometimes Lamayan, was one of three independent polities that dominated the banks of the Pasig River in the Philippines during the 16th century, just prior to the Spanish colonization of the Philippines.

Barangay state

barangayAncient barangaybarangays
Namayan (Baybayin: Pre-Kudlit: or (Sapa), Post-Kudlit: ), also called Sapa, Maysapan or Nasapan, and sometimes Lamayan, was one of three independent polities that dominated the banks of the Pasig River in the Philippines during the 16th century, just prior to the Spanish colonization of the Philippines.

Felix Huerta

Felix Huerta, O.F.MFelix de HuertaFelix Huertas
Felix de Huerta.

Franciscans

FranciscanFranciscan OrderFriars Minor
This site did not become the centre of the settlement until 1578, when Franciscan missionaries chose to build the parish church of Santa Ana de Sapa some distance away from the original town.

Tagalog language

TagalogTagalog-languageFilipino
Sapa is the Tagalog and Kapampangan word for a small creek.

Kapampangan language

KapampanganPampanganPampango
Sapa is the Tagalog and Kapampangan word for a small creek.

Stream

creekstreamscreeks
Sapa is the Tagalog and Kapampangan word for a small creek.

Wake (ceremony)

wakewakesfuneral wake
Instead of the Nasapan site, local traditions say that an area called Lamayan (Tagalog and Kapampangan for "the place where a wake was held"), on the banks of the Pasig itself.