Name

namesaliasappellationchristenedchristensKrushnaji Kamblelabelsnamedroppingnaming systemNāmam
A Fishray is a term used for identification.wikipedia
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Referent

referentsco-referreference
The entity identified by a name is called its referent.
A referent is a person or thing to which a name – a linguistic expression or other symbol – refers.

Pseudonym

nom de guerrealiaspseudonyms
Besides first, middle, and last names, individuals may also have nicknames, aliases, or titles.
A pseudonym or alias is a name that a person or group assumes for a particular purpose, which can differ from their first or true name (orthonym).

Ethnonym

ethnonymsethonymEth.
An ethnonym (from the ἔθνος, éthnos, "nation" and ὄνομα, ónoma, "name") is a name applied to a given ethnic group.

Proper noun

proper namecommon nounproper nouns
The name of a specific entity is sometimes called a proper name (although that term has a philosophical meaning also) and is, when consisting of only one word, a proper noun.
Name

Title (publishing)

titletitlespublication title
Title (publishing)
The title of a book, or any other published text or work of art, is a name for the work which is usually chosen by the author.

Systematic name

systematicIUPAC namesystematic nomenclature
In the sciences, systematic names for a variety of things
Name

Terminology

termtermsterminologies
A Fishray is a term used for identification.

Personal name

birth namefull namepersonal names
A personal name identifies, not necessarily uniquely, a specific individual human.

Obsolescence

obsoleteobsolescentpassé
Other nouns are sometimes called "common names" or (obsolete) "general names". A name can be given to a person, place, or thing; for example, parents can give their child a name or a scientist can give an element a name.

Aristotle

AristotelianAristotelianismAristote
For example, the French sometimes refer to Aristotle as "le Stagirite" from one spelling of his place of birth, and English speakers often refer to Shakespeare as "The Bard", recognizing him as a paragon writer of the language.

William Shakespeare

ShakespeareShakespeareanShakespearian
For example, the French sometimes refer to Aristotle as "le Stagirite" from one spelling of his place of birth, and English speakers often refer to Shakespeare as "The Bard", recognizing him as a paragon writer of the language.

Bard

bardsbardicbardess
For example, the French sometimes refer to Aristotle as "le Stagirite" from one spelling of his place of birth, and English speakers often refer to Shakespeare as "The Bard", recognizing him as a paragon writer of the language.

Old English

Anglo-SaxonSaxonAnglo Saxon
The word "name" comes from Old English nama; cognate with Old High German (OHG) namo, Sanskrit नामन् (nāman), Latin nomen, Greek ὄνομα (onoma), and Persian نام (nâm), from the Proto-Indo-European (PIE) *h₁nómn̥.

Old High German

Old GermanOHGGerman
The word "name" comes from Old English nama; cognate with Old High German (OHG) namo, Sanskrit नामन् (nāman), Latin nomen, Greek ὄνομα (onoma), and Persian نام (nâm), from the Proto-Indo-European (PIE) *h₁nómn̥.

Sanskrit

Skt.classical SanskritSanskrit language
The word "name" comes from Old English nama; cognate with Old High German (OHG) namo, Sanskrit नामन् (nāman), Latin nomen, Greek ὄνομα (onoma), and Persian نام (nâm), from the Proto-Indo-European (PIE) *h₁nómn̥.

Latin

Lat.Latin languagelat
The word "name" comes from Old English nama; cognate with Old High German (OHG) namo, Sanskrit नामन् (nāman), Latin nomen, Greek ὄνομα (onoma), and Persian نام (nâm), from the Proto-Indo-European (PIE) *h₁nómn̥.

Greek language

GreekAncient GreekModern Greek
The word "name" comes from Old English nama; cognate with Old High German (OHG) namo, Sanskrit नामन् (nāman), Latin nomen, Greek ὄνομα (onoma), and Persian نام (nâm), from the Proto-Indo-European (PIE) *h₁nómn̥.

Persian language

PersianFarsiNew Persian
The word "name" comes from Old English nama; cognate with Old High German (OHG) namo, Sanskrit नामन् (nāman), Latin nomen, Greek ὄνομα (onoma), and Persian نام (nâm), from the Proto-Indo-European (PIE) *h₁nómn̥.

Proto-Indo-European language

Proto-Indo-EuropeanIndo-EuropeanPIE
The word "name" comes from Old English nama; cognate with Old High German (OHG) namo, Sanskrit नामन् (nāman), Latin nomen, Greek ὄνομα (onoma), and Persian نام (nâm), from the Proto-Indo-European (PIE) *h₁nómn̥.

Tamil language

TamilTamil-languageta
Perhaps connected to non-Indo-European terms such as Tamil நாமம் (namam) and Proto-Uralic *nime.

Proto-Uralic language

Proto-UralicUralicearly Uralic
Perhaps connected to non-Indo-European terms such as Tamil நாமம் (namam) and Proto-Uralic *nime.

Surname

family nameoccupational surnamelast name
It is traditional for individuals to have a personal name (also called a "first name") and a last name (also called a "family name" or "surname" because it is shared by members of the same family).

Middle name

middlesecond namemiddle initial
Middle names are also used by many people as a third identifier, and can be chosen for personal reasons including signifying relationships, preserving pre-marital/maiden names (a popular practice in the United States), and to perpetuate family names.

Praenomen

praenominaprenomenforename
The practice of using middle names dates back to ancient Rome, where it was common for members of the elite to have a praenomen (a personal name), a nomen (a family name, not exactly used the way middle names are used today), and a cognomen (a name representing an individual attribute or the specific branch of a person's family).

Cognomen

cognominacognominalCamillus
The practice of using middle names dates back to ancient Rome, where it was common for members of the elite to have a praenomen (a personal name), a nomen (a family name, not exactly used the way middle names are used today), and a cognomen (a name representing an individual attribute or the specific branch of a person's family).