Name of Canada

Dominion of CanadaBorealiaCanadaCanada's nameDominionname "Canadanamed "The Country of CanadasBritish Dominion of Canadadominion'' was chosenfederal government
The name of Canada has been in use since the founding of the French colony of Canada in the 16th century.wikipedia
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Canada (New France)

CanadaColony of CanadaNew France
The name of Canada has been in use since the founding of the French colony of Canada in the 16th century.
The word "Canada" at this point referred to the territory along the Saint Lawrence River, then known as the Canada river, from Grosse Island in the east to a point between Quebec and Trois-Rivières, although this territory had greatly expanded by 1600.

Quebec French

FrenchQuébécoisQuebec
It is pronounced in English and in standard Quebec French.
It also began to borrow words and gather importations (see loan word), especially place names such as Québec, Canada and Hochelaga, and words to describe the flora and fauna such as (cranberry) and (largemouth bass), from First Nations languages.

Canadian Confederation

ConfederationConfederation of CanadaFather of Confederation
Upon Confederation in 1867, the name Canada was officially adopted for the new Dominion of Canada.
Canadian Confederation (Confédération canadienne) was the process by which the British colonies of the Province of Canada, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick were united into one federation, Canada (formally the Dominion of Canada), on July 1, 1867.

Jacques Cartier

CartierCartier, JacquesFrench navigator and explorer
This explanation is historically documented in Jacques Cartier's Bref récit et succincte narration de la navigation faite en MDXXXV et MDXXXVI.
Jacques Cartier was the first European to describe and map the Gulf of Saint Lawrence and the shores of the Saint Lawrence River, which he named "The Country of Canadas", after the Iroquois names for the two big settlements he saw at Stadacona (Quebec City) and at Hochelaga (Montreal Island).

Quebec City

QuebecQuebec City, QuebecQuébec City
Although the Laurentian language, which was spoken by the inhabitants of St. Lawrence Valley settlements such as Stadacona (modern-day Quebec City) and Hochelaga (modern-day Montreal) in the 16th century, is now extinct, it was closely related to other dialects of the Iroquoian languages, such as the Oneida and Mohawk languages.
The name "Canada" refers to this settlement.

Albion

AlbaAlbinaAlbinus
New Albion and Albionoria ("Albion of the North") were briefly suggested as names of Canada during the period of the Canadian Confederation.

St. Lawrence Iroquoians

St. Lawrence IroquoianLaurentianIroquoian
The name Canada is now generally accepted as originating from the St. Lawrence Iroquoian word kanata or canada, meaning "village" or "settlement".
The origins of the word canada, from which the nation derived its name, offers an example of the changes in historical understanding required by new evidence.

Bref récit

Bref récit et succincte narration de la navigation faite en MDXXXV et MDXXXVIBref récit et succincte narration de le navigation faite en MDXXXV et MDXXXVI
This explanation is historically documented in Jacques Cartier's Bref récit et succincte narration de la navigation faite en MDXXXV et MDXXXVI.
The book is noted, in part, for providing the historical documentation for the name of Canada.

Samuel Leonard Tilley

Sir Samuel Leonard TilleySamuel L. TilleySamuel Tilley
New Brunswick premier Sir Samuel Leonard Tilley suggested the term 'Dominion', inspired by Psalm 72:8 (from the King James Bible): "He shall have dominion also from sea to sea, and from the river unto the ends of the earth."
A common tale states that Tilley was the originator of the word "Dominion" in Canada's name.

Laurentian language

LaurentianSt. Lawrence IroquoianSaint-Lawrence Iroquoian
Although the Laurentian language, which was spoken by the inhabitants of St. Lawrence Valley settlements such as Stadacona (modern-day Quebec City) and Hochelaga (modern-day Montreal) in the 16th century, is now extinct, it was closely related to other dialects of the Iroquoian languages, such as the Oneida and Mohawk languages. The name originates from a Saint-Lawrence Iroquoian word kanata (or canada) for "settlement", "village", or "land".

Inuktitut

Inuktitut languageInuktitukInuktitut writing
In Inuktitut, one of the official languages of the territory of Nunavut, the Iroquoian word (pronounced ) is used, with the Inuktitut syllabics ᑲᓇᑕ.

Nunavut

NUGovernment of NunavutNunavut Territory
In Inuktitut, one of the official languages of the territory of Nunavut, the Iroquoian word (pronounced ) is used, with the Inuktitut syllabics ᑲᓇᑕ.

Inuktitut syllabics

syllabicsInuktitutak'''ł'''ak
In Inuktitut, one of the official languages of the territory of Nunavut, the Iroquoian word (pronounced ) is used, with the Inuktitut syllabics ᑲᓇᑕ.

New France

FrenchCanadaNouvelle-France
The first French colony of Canada, which formed one of several colonies within New France, was set up along the Saint Lawrence River and the northern shores of the Great Lakes.

Great Lakes

North American Great LakesGreat Lakethe Great Lakes
The first French colony of Canada, which formed one of several colonies within New France, was set up along the Saint Lawrence River and the northern shores of the Great Lakes.

Upper Canada

UpperProvince of Upper CanadaUpper Canadian
Later the area became two British colonies, called Upper Canada and Lower Canada until their union as the British Province of Canada in 1841.

Lower Canada

LowerProvince of Lower CanadaLower Canadian
Later the area became two British colonies, called Upper Canada and Lower Canada until their union as the British Province of Canada in 1841.

Province of Canada

Canada WestUnited Province of CanadaCanada
Later the area became two British colonies, called Upper Canada and Lower Canada until their union as the British Province of Canada in 1841.

Dominion

DominionsBritish Dominiondominion status
Upon Confederation in 1867, the name Canada was officially adopted for the new Dominion of Canada.

Canada

CanadianCANCanadians
Upon Confederation in 1867, the name Canada was officially adopted for the new Dominion of Canada.

Saint Lawrence River

St. Lawrence RiverSt Lawrence RiverSt. Lawrence
Although the Laurentian language, which was spoken by the inhabitants of St. Lawrence Valley settlements such as Stadacona (modern-day Quebec City) and Hochelaga (modern-day Montreal) in the 16th century, is now extinct, it was closely related to other dialects of the Iroquoian languages, such as the Oneida and Mohawk languages. The first French colony of Canada, which formed one of several colonies within New France, was set up along the Saint Lawrence River and the northern shores of the Great Lakes.

Stadacona

Quebec villageStadacona (Quebec City)Stadaconé
Although the Laurentian language, which was spoken by the inhabitants of St. Lawrence Valley settlements such as Stadacona (modern-day Quebec City) and Hochelaga (modern-day Montreal) in the 16th century, is now extinct, it was closely related to other dialects of the Iroquoian languages, such as the Oneida and Mohawk languages.