Names of God

name of GodLordGodname for Godnamesholy namesnames of a deitythe name of Goddivine namesepithets for God
There are various names of God, many of which enumerate the various qualities of a Supreme Being.wikipedia
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God

Supreme BeingLordnature of God
There are various names of God, many of which enumerate the various qualities of a Supreme Being.
Monotheists refer to their gods using names prescribed by their respective religions, with some of these names referring to certain cultural ideas about their god's identity and attributes.

Thou shalt not take the name of the Lord thy God in vain

taking God's name in vainblasphemyin vain
The prohibition on misuse (not use) of this name is the primary subject of the command not to take the name of the Lord in vain.
It is a prohibition of blasphemy, specifically, the misuse or "taking in vain" of the name of the God of Israel, or using His name to commit evil.

Ancient of Days

Atik YominAtika Kadishaone of God's titles in the Book of Daniel
Other names used by Christians include Ancient of Days, Father/Abba which is Hebrew, "Most High" and the Hebrew names Elohim, El-Shaddai, Yahweh, Jehovah and Adonai.
Ancient of Days is a name for God in the Book of Daniel: in the original Aramaic atik yomin עַתִּיק יֹומִין; in the Septuagint palaios hemeron ; and in the Vulgate antiquus dierum.

I Am that I Am

I AM WHO AMI Am who I Ama sacred name of God
For example, in Judaism the tetragrammaton is sometimes related to the ancient Hebrew ehyeh ("I will be").

Monotheism

monotheisticmonotheistmonotheists
Correlation between various theories and interpretation of the name of "the one God", used to signify a monotheistic or ultimate Supreme Being from which all other divine attributes derive, has been a subject of ecumenical discourse between Eastern and Western scholars for over two centuries.
The hymn is an early example of enumerating the names of a deity, a tradition developed extensively in the sahasranama literature of Hinduism.

God (word)

godtheostheos = god
The English word "God" (and its equivalent in other languages) is used by multiple religions as a noun or name to refer to different deities, or specifically to the Supreme Being, as denoted in English by the capitalized and uncapitalized terms "God" and "god".

Elohim

GodEloahElokim
Ancient cognate equivalents for the biblical Hebrew Elohim, one of the most common names of God in the Bible, include proto-Semitic El, biblical Aramaic Elah, and Arabic 'ilah.

Islam

IslamicMuslimMuslims
Allah—meaning "the god" in Arabic—is the name of God in Islam.
This includes greeting others with "as-salamu 'alaykum" ("peace be unto you"), saying bismillah ("in the name of God") before meals, and using only the right hand for eating and drinking.

Names of God in Judaism

AdonaiGodHaShem
For example, in Judaism the tetragrammaton is sometimes related to the ancient Hebrew ehyeh ("I will be"). Ancient cognate equivalents for the biblical Hebrew Elohim, one of the most common names of God in the Bible, include proto-Semitic El, biblical Aramaic Elah, and Arabic 'ilah.

Mandaeism

MandaeanMandaeansMandean
Mandaeans believe in one God called Hayyi Rabbi (The Great Life or The Great Living God).
Other names used are Mare d'Rabuta (Lord of Greatness) and Melka d'Nhura (King of Light).

Shangdi

ShàngdìShang DiDi
Shàngdì (上帝 pinyin shàng dì, literally 'King Above') is used to refer to the Christian God in the Standard Chinese Union Version of the Bible.

Tianzhu (Chinese name of God)

TiānzhǔTianzhuLord of Heaven
Zhŭ and Tiānzhǔ 主,天主 (lit.

Incarnation (Christianity)

IncarnationIncarnation of Christincarnate
In Mormonism the name of God the Father is Elohim and the name of Jesus in his pre-incarnate state was Jehovah.
The Mormon godhead of Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost are not said to be one in substance or essence; instead, they remain three separate beings, or personages.

Hu (Sufism)

HuHe-ness
In Tasawwuf, the inner, mystical dimension of Islam, Hu, Huwa (depends on placement in sentence), or Parvardigar in Persian are used as names of God.
In Sufism Hu or Huwa is the pronoun used with Allah or God, and is used as a name of God.

Allah

GodAllāhAlmighty Allah
Allah—meaning "the god" in Arabic—is the name of God in Islam. For instance, names like Ram (pervading), Hari (shining), Parmeshwar (supreme lord), and Jagdish (world lord) refer to Hindu terms, while names like Allah (Arabic for God), Khuda (Persian for God), Rahim (merciful), Karim (generous), and Sahib (lord) are of Muslim origin.

Khuda

KhodaKhodaiKhodaii
For instance, names like Ram (pervading), Hari (shining), Parmeshwar (supreme lord), and Jagdish (world lord) refer to Hindu terms, while names like Allah (Arabic for God), Khuda (Persian for God), Rahim (merciful), Karim (generous), and Sahib (lord) are of Muslim origin.

Ahura Mazda

OhrmazdAhuramazdaMazda
In Zoroastrianism, 101 names of God (Pazand Sad-o-yak nam-i-khoda) is a list of names of God (Ahura Mazda).

Quality (philosophy)

qualityqualitiesqualitative
There are various names of God, many of which enumerate the various qualities of a Supreme Being.

Noun

nounssubstantiveabstract noun
The English word "God" (and its equivalent in other languages) is used by multiple religions as a noun or name to refer to different deities, or specifically to the Supreme Being, as denoted in English by the capitalized and uncapitalized terms "God" and "god".

Proper noun

proper namecommon nounproper nouns
The English word "God" (and its equivalent in other languages) is used by multiple religions as a noun or name to refer to different deities, or specifically to the Supreme Being, as denoted in English by the capitalized and uncapitalized terms "God" and "god".

Cognate

cognatescognationequivalent
Ancient cognate equivalents for the biblical Hebrew Elohim, one of the most common names of God in the Bible, include proto-Semitic El, biblical Aramaic Elah, and Arabic 'ilah.