Names of God in Judaism

GodHashemnames of Godname of GodAdonaiYahLordthe NameDivine NamesGod's name
The name of God most often used in the Hebrew Bible is the Tetragrammaton (YHWH ).wikipedia
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Tetragrammaton

YHWHGodYahweh
The name of God most often used in the Hebrew Bible is the Tetragrammaton (YHWH ).
Common substitutions for Hebrew forms are hakadosh baruch hu ("The Holy One, Blessed Be He"), Adonai or HaShem ("The Name").

Jehovah

GodGod of HostsIehova
It is frequently anglicized as Jehovah and Yahweh and written in most English editions of the Bible as "the " owing to the Jewish tradition increasingly viewing the divine name as too sacred to be uttered.
Jehovah is a Latinization of the Hebrew, one vocalization of the Tetragrammaton (YHWH), the proper name of the God of Israel in the Hebrew Bible and one of the seven names of God in Judaism.

God

supreme beingLordCreator
The name of God most often used in the Hebrew Bible is the Tetragrammaton (YHWH ).
In the Hebrew Tanakh, God is referred to as Elohim or Adonai, in addition to other names.

Elohim

God’ĕlōhîmElokim
Rabbinic Judaism describes seven names which are so holy that, once written, should not be erased: YHWH and six others which can be categorized as titles are El ("God"), Eloah ("God"), Elohim ("Gods"), Shaddai (“Almighty"), Ehyeh (“I Will Be”), and Tzevaot ("[of] Hosts"). Other names are considered mere epithets or titles reflecting different aspects of God, but chumrah sometimes dictates special care such as the writing of "G-d" instead of "God" in English or saying Ṭēt-Vav (undefined, lit. "9-6") instead of Yōd-Hē (undefined, lit. "10-5" but also "Jah") for the number fifteen in Hebrew. The Masoretic Text uses vowel points of Adonai or Elohim (depending on the context) marking the pronunciation as Yəhōwāh ; however, scholarly consensus is that this is not the original pronunciation.
Elohim (Hebrew: ) in the Hebrew Bible refers to deities, and is one of the many names or titles for God in the Hebrew Bible.

Jah

Yah-iahGod
Rabbinic Judaism describes seven names which are so holy that, once written, should not be erased: YHWH and six others which can be categorized as titles are El ("God"), Eloah ("God"), Elohim ("Gods"), Shaddai (“Almighty"), Ehyeh (“I Will Be”), and Tzevaot ("[of] Hosts"). Other names are considered mere epithets or titles reflecting different aspects of God, but chumrah sometimes dictates special care such as the writing of "G-d" instead of "God" in English or saying Ṭēt-Vav (undefined, lit. "9-6") instead of Yōd-Hē (undefined, lit. "10-5" but also "Jah") for the number fifteen in Hebrew.
Jah or Yah (, Yah) is a short form of Yahweh (in consonantal spelling YHWH, called the Tetragrammaton), the proper name of God in the Hebrew Bible.

Ineffability

ineffablecannot be expressed in wordscannot put the ''feeling'' of a passion into words
It is frequently anglicized as Jehovah and Yahweh and written in most English editions of the Bible as "the " owing to the Jewish tradition increasingly viewing the divine name as too sacred to be uttered.
A typical example is the name of God in Judaism, written as YHWH but substituted with "the Lord" or "HaShem" (the name) when reading.

God in Judaism

GodGod of IsraelGod of the Jews
The documentary hypothesis proposes that the Torah was compiled from various original sources, two of which (the Jahwist and the Elohist) are named for their usual names for God (YHWH and Elohim respectively).
The names of God used most often in the Hebrew Bible are the Tetragrammaton (YHWH Hebrew: ) and Elohim.

Kyrios

kurioskyrioiLord
It was thus replaced vocally in the synagogue ritual by the Hebrew word Adonai (“My Lords”), which was translated as Kyrios (“Lord”) in the Septuagint, the Greek version of the Hebrew scriptures.
The reasoning here is that at the time that the Septuagint was written, when reading out loud Jews pronounced Adonai, the Hebrew word for "Lord", when they encountered the name of God, "YHWH", which was thus translated into Greek in each instance as kyrios.

El Shaddai

ShaddaiAlmightyDWXI Prayer Partners Foundation
Rabbinic Judaism describes seven names which are so holy that, once written, should not be erased: YHWH and six others which can be categorized as titles are El ("God"), Eloah ("God"), Elohim ("Gods"), Shaddai (“Almighty"), Ehyeh (“I Will Be”), and Tzevaot ("[of] Hosts"). Other names are considered mere epithets or titles reflecting different aspects of God, but chumrah sometimes dictates special care such as the writing of "G-d" instead of "God" in English or saying Ṭēt-Vav (undefined, lit. "9-6") instead of Yōd-Hē (undefined, lit. "10-5" but also "Jah") for the number fifteen in Hebrew.
El Shaddai or just Shaddai is one of the names of the God of Israel.

Holy of Holies

Most Holy Placeinner sanctuaryVeil of the Temple
Rabbinical Judaism teaches that the name is forbidden to all except the High Priest, who should only speak it in the Holy of Holies of the Temple in Jerusalem on Yom Kippur.
According to the Hebrew Bible, in order that God may dwell among the Israelites, God gave Moses instructions for erecting a sanctuary.

Elohist

EElohist (E)
The documentary hypothesis proposes that the Torah was compiled from various original sources, two of which (the Jahwist and the Elohist) are named for their usual names for God (YHWH and Elohim respectively).
In the E source God's name is always presented as "Elohim" or "El" until the revelation of God's name to Moses, after which God is referred to as "YHWH".

15 (number)

15fifteen15th
Rabbinic Judaism describes seven names which are so holy that, once written, should not be erased: YHWH and six others which can be categorized as titles are El ("God"), Eloah ("God"), Elohim ("Gods"), Shaddai (“Almighty"), Ehyeh (“I Will Be”), and Tzevaot ("[of] Hosts"). Other names are considered mere epithets or titles reflecting different aspects of God, but chumrah sometimes dictates special care such as the writing of "G-d" instead of "God" in English or saying Ṭēt-Vav (undefined, lit. "9-6") instead of Yōd-Hē (undefined, lit. "10-5" but also "Jah") for the number fifteen in Hebrew.
In the Hebrew numbering system, the number 15 is not written according to the usual method, with the letters that represent "10" and "5" (י-ה, yodh and heh), because those spell out one of the Jewish names of God. Instead, the date is written with the letters representing "9" and "6" (ט-ו, teth and vav)

I Am that I Am

I am who I ama sacred name of GodEheieh
Rabbinic Judaism describes seven names which are so holy that, once written, should not be erased: YHWH and six others which can be categorized as titles are El ("God"), Eloah ("God"), Elohim ("Gods"), Shaddai (“Almighty"), Ehyeh (“I Will Be”), and Tzevaot ("[of] Hosts"). Other names are considered mere epithets or titles reflecting different aspects of God, but chumrah sometimes dictates special care such as the writing of "G-d" instead of "God" in English or saying Ṭēt-Vav (undefined, lit. "9-6") instead of Yōd-Hē (undefined, lit. "10-5" but also "Jah") for the number fifteen in Hebrew.
Names of God in Judaism

Yahweh

GodYahGod of Israel
It is frequently anglicized as Jehovah and Yahweh and written in most English editions of the Bible as "the " owing to the Jewish tradition increasingly viewing the divine name as too sacred to be uttered.
Yahweh is frequently invoked in Graeco-Roman magical texts dating from the second century BCE to the fifth century CE, most notably in the Greek Magical Papyri, under the names Iao, Adonai, Sabaoth, and Eloai.

Teth

Tetטṭēt
Rabbinic Judaism describes seven names which are so holy that, once written, should not be erased: YHWH and six others which can be categorized as titles are El ("God"), Eloah ("God"), Elohim ("Gods"), Shaddai (“Almighty"), Ehyeh (“I Will Be”), and Tzevaot ("[of] Hosts"). Other names are considered mere epithets or titles reflecting different aspects of God, but chumrah sometimes dictates special care such as the writing of "G-d" instead of "God" in English or saying Ṭēt-Vav (undefined, lit. "9-6") instead of Yōd-Hē (undefined, lit. "10-5" but also "Jah") for the number fifteen in Hebrew.
As well, in gematria, the number 15 is written with Tet and Vav, (9+6) to avoid the normal construction Yud and Hei (10+5) which spells a name of God.

John (given name)

JohnJan(Ioannis)
It is a common element in Hebrew theophoric names such as Elijah and also appears in the forms yahu ("Jeremiah"), yeho ("Joshua"), and yo ("John", ultimately from the biblical "Yohanan").
The name is derived from the Latin Ioannes and Iohannes, which are forms of the Greek name Iōannēs, originally borne by Hellenized Jews transliterating the Hebrew name Yohanan, "Graced by Yah", or, "Yahweh is Gracious".

Masoretic Text

MasoreticMasorahMasoretic tradition
The Masoretic Text uses vowel points of Adonai or Elohim (depending on the context) marking the pronunciation as Yəhōwāh ; however, scholarly consensus is that this is not the original pronunciation.
Safeguarding of the Tetragrammaton; e.g. substitution of "Elohim" or "Adonai" for "YHWH" in some passages.

Adon

lord
Adonai (, lit. "My Lords") is the plural form of adon ("Lord") along with the first-person singular pronoun enclitic.
The pluralization of Adon "my lord" is Adonai "my lords."

El (deity)

ElGodĒl
Rabbinic Judaism describes seven names which are so holy that, once written, should not be erased: YHWH and six others which can be categorized as titles are El ("God"), Eloah ("God"), Elohim ("Gods"), Shaddai (“Almighty"), Ehyeh (“I Will Be”), and Tzevaot ("[of] Hosts"). Other names are considered mere epithets or titles reflecting different aspects of God, but chumrah sometimes dictates special care such as the writing of "G-d" instead of "God" in English or saying Ṭēt-Vav (undefined, lit. "9-6") instead of Yōd-Hē (undefined, lit. "10-5" but also "Jah") for the number fifteen in Hebrew.
Names of God in Judaism

Angels in Judaism

angelangelsJewish angelic hierarchy
In its later uses, however, it often denotes God in His role as leader of the heavenly hosts.
God promises to send one to Moses in Exodus 33:2, and sends one to stand in the way of Balaam in Numbers 22:31.

He (letter)

HeHeiHeh
Rabbinic Judaism describes seven names which are so holy that, once written, should not be erased: YHWH and six others which can be categorized as titles are El ("God"), Eloah ("God"), Elohim ("Gods"), Shaddai (“Almighty"), Ehyeh (“I Will Be”), and Tzevaot ("[of] Hosts"). Other names are considered mere epithets or titles reflecting different aspects of God, but chumrah sometimes dictates special care such as the writing of "G-d" instead of "God" in English or saying Ṭēt-Vav (undefined, lit. "9-6") instead of Yōd-Hē (undefined, lit. "10-5" but also "Jah") for the number fifteen in Hebrew.
Hei is often used to represent the name of God as an abbreviation for Hashem, which means The Name and is a way of saying God without actually saying the name of God.

Yodh

Yudyodي
Rabbinic Judaism describes seven names which are so holy that, once written, should not be erased: YHWH and six others which can be categorized as titles are El ("God"), Eloah ("God"), Elohim ("Gods"), Shaddai (“Almighty"), Ehyeh (“I Will Be”), and Tzevaot ("[of] Hosts"). Other names are considered mere epithets or titles reflecting different aspects of God, but chumrah sometimes dictates special care such as the writing of "G-d" instead of "God" in English or saying Ṭēt-Vav (undefined, lit. "9-6") instead of Yōd-Hē (undefined, lit. "10-5" but also "Jah") for the number fifteen in Hebrew.
Two Yuds in a row designate the name of God Adonai and in pointed texts are written with the vowels of Adonai; this is done as well with the Tetragrammaton.

Hallelujah

AllelujaHallelujaAlleluia
It also appears 24 times in the Psalms as a part of Hallelujah ("Praise Jah").
The second part, Yah, is a shortened form of YHWH, the name for the Creator.

Adonis

Far East Amur adonisAchtaroutAdone
The Phoenicians used it as a title of Tammuz, the origin of the Greek Adonis.
This word is related to Adonai, one of the titles used to refer to the God of the Hebrew Bible and still used in Judaism to the present day.

Baal

Ba‘alBa'alBa'al Hammon
Baal, properly Baʿal, meant "owner" and, by extension, "lord", "master", and "husband" in Hebrew and the other Northwest Semitic languages.
Scholars propose that, as the cult of Hadad increased in importance, his true name came to be seen as too holy for any but the high priest to speak aloud and the alias "Lord" ("Baʿal") was used instead, as "Bel" was used for Marduk among the Babylonians and "Adonai" for Yahweh among the Israelites.