Nanda Empire

Nanda dynastyNandaNandasNanda kingsMagadha empireMagadhanNanda EmperorNanda eraNanda kingNanda period
The Nanda dynasty ruled in northern part of the Indian subcontinent during the 4th century BCE, and possibly during the 5th century BCE.wikipedia
239 Related Articles

Gangaridai

Gangaridai EmpireGangaridai KingdomGônggarriddhi
Modern historians generally identify the ruler of the Gangaridai and the Prasii mentioned in ancient Greco-Roman accounts as a Nanda king.
The writers variously mention the Gangaridai as a distinct tribe, or a nation within a larger kingdom (presumably the Nanda Empire).

Maurya Empire

Mauryan EmpireMauryanMaurya
The last Nanda king was overthrown by Chandragupta Maurya, the founder of the Maurya Empire, and the latter's mentor Chanakya.
Chandragupta Maurya raised an army, with the assistance of Chanakya (also known as Kauṭilya), and overthrew the Nanda Empire in c.

Indian campaign of Alexander the Great

Indian campaignAlexander's India campaigncampaign in India
The chroniclers of Alexander the Great, who invaded north-western India during 327-325 BCE, characterize this king as a militarily powerful and prosperous ruler. Alexander the Great invaded north-western India at the time of Agrammes or Xandrames, whom modern historians generally identified as the last Nanda king - Dhana Nanda.
Alexander's march east put him in confrontation with the Nanda Empire of Magadha and the Gangaridai of Bengal.

Mahapadma Nanda

MahapadmaNandaUgrasena Nanda
The Puranas name the dynasty's founder as Mahapadma, and claim that he was the son of the Shaishunaga king Mahanandin.
Mahapadma Nanda (IAST: Mahāpadmānanda; c. 4th century BCE), according to the Puranas, was the first Emperor of the Nanda Empire of ancient India.

Chanakya

KautilyaKautiliyaAcharya Chanakya
The last Nanda king was overthrown by Chandragupta Maurya, the founder of the Maurya Empire, and the latter's mentor Chanakya. The Nanda dynasty was overthrown by Chandragupta Maurya, who was supported by his mentor (and later minister) Chanakya.
According to the Buddhist legend, the Nanda kings who preceded Chandragupta were robbers-turned-rulers.

Shaishunaga dynasty

Shishunaga dynastyShishunaga EmpireShaishunaga
The Puranas name the dynasty's founder as Mahapadma, and claim that he was the son of the Shaishunaga king Mahanandin. The Nandas overthrew the Shaishunaga dynasty in the Magadha region of eastern India, and expanded their empire to include a larger part of northern India.
This dynasty was succeeded by the Nanda Empire in c. 345 BCE.

Patna

Patna, BiharMount Carmel High School, PatnaPatna, India
The Nanda capital was located at Pataliputra (near present-day Patna) in the Magadha region of eastern India.
Ancient Patna, known as Patliputra, was the capital of the Magadh Empire under the Haryanka, Nanda, Mauryan, Shunga, Gupta and Pala empires.

Pataliputra

PatliputraPāṭaliputraPushpapura
The Nanda capital was located at Pataliputra (near present-day Patna) in the Magadha region of eastern India. After that, the Nandas rose to power at Pataliputra and captured the Avanti capital Ujjayini.
413–345 BCE), Nanda Empire (c.

Chandragupta Maurya

ChandraguptaChandra Gupta MauryaSandracottus
The last Nanda king was overthrown by Chandragupta Maurya, the founder of the Maurya Empire, and the latter's mentor Chanakya. The Nanda dynasty was overthrown by Chandragupta Maurya, who was supported by his mentor (and later minister) Chanakya.
The conquest was fictionalised in Mudrarakshasa, in which Chandragupta is said to have first acquired Punjab and then allied with a local king named Parvatka under the advice of Chanakya, and advanced upon the Nanda Empire.

Alexander the Great

AlexanderAlexander III of MacedonAlexander of Macedon
The chroniclers of Alexander the Great, who invaded north-western India during 327-325 BCE, characterize this king as a militarily powerful and prosperous ruler. Alexander the Great invaded north-western India at the time of Agrammes or Xandrames, whom modern historians generally identified as the last Nanda king - Dhana Nanda.
East of Porus' kingdom, near the Ganges River, was the Nanda Empire of Magadha, and further east, the Gangaridai Empire of Bengal region of the Indian subcontinent.

Magadha

MagadhMagadha KingdomMagadhas
The Nandas overthrew the Shaishunaga dynasty in the Magadha region of eastern India, and expanded their empire to include a larger part of northern India. The Nanda capital was located at Pataliputra (near present-day Patna) in the Magadha region of eastern India.
Buddhism and Jainism were the religions promoted by the early Magadhan kings, such as Srenika, Bimbisara and Ajatashatru, and the Nanda Dynasty (345–321 BCE) that followed was mostly Jain.

Bihar

Bihar stateBihar, IndiaState of Bihar
* The Maithala (literally, "of Mithila") territory was located to the north of Magadha, on the border of present-day Nepal and northern Bihar.
Later the Nanda Dynasty ruled a vast tract stretching from Bengal to Punjab.

Hathigumpha inscription

Hathigumpha inscriptionsHathigumpha'' inscriptionHatigumpha inscription
Proponents of this theory also interpret the Hathigumpha inscription to mean that "Nandaraja" (the Nanda king) flourished in year 103 of the Mahavira Era, that is, in 424 BCE. An analysis of various historical sources - including the ancient Greek accounts, the Puranas, and the Hathigumpha inscription - suggests that the Nandas controlled eastern India, the Ganges valley, and at least a part of Kalinga.

Mudrarakshasa

MalayketuMalayaketuMudra-Rakshasa
This is confirmed by the Buddhist and Jain traditions, as well as the Sanskrit play Mudrarakshasa.
Parvata and Chandragupta plan to divide up the old possessions of the Nanda Empire.

Parishishtaparvan

Parishishta-ParvanPariśiṣṭaparvan
The Jain tradition, as recorded in the Avashyaka Sutra and Parishishta-parvan, corroborates the Greco-Roman accounts, stating that the first Nanda king was the son of a barber.
According to Hemachandra, the sequence of rulers in the times of the Jains discussed was: Shrenika, Kunika, Udayin, the nine Nandas, Chandragupta Maurya, Ashoka, and Samprati.

Karnataka

Karnataka StateKarnataka, IndiaKarnatka
Some inscriptions suggest that the Nandas also ruled the Kuntala country, which included a part of present-day Karnataka in southern India.
Prior to the third century BCE, most of Karnataka formed part of the Nanda Empire before coming under the Mauryan empire of Emperor Ashoka.

Dhana Nanda

NandaDhananandDhana
Alexander the Great invaded north-western India at the time of Agrammes or Xandrames, whom modern historians generally identified as the last Nanda king - Dhana Nanda.
According to the Buddhist text Mahabodhivamsa, Dhana Nanda (died c. 321 BCE) was the last ruler of the Nanda dynasty.

War elephant

war elephantselephantselephantry
According to Curtius, Alexander learned that Agrammes had 200,000 infantry; 20,000 cavalry; 3000 elephants; and 2,000 four-horse chariots.
The Mahajanapadas would be conquered by the Nanda Empire under the reign of Mahapadma Nanda.

Avanti (Ancient India)

AvantiMalavasAvanti Kingdom
The 14th century Jain writer Merutunga, in his Vichara-shreni, states that king Chandra Pradyota of Avanti died on the same night as the Jain leader Mahavira.
Avanti was a part of the Magadha empire during the rule of the Shaishunaga and the Nanda dynasties.

Nanded

Nanded, MHNanded DistrictNander
According to one theory, Nanded in this region was originally called "Nau Nand Dehra" (abode of the nine Nandas), which may be considered as evidence of the Nanda control of this area.
In the 5th and 4th centuries BCE, Nanded was ruled by the Nanda dynasty.

Kalinga (historical region)

KalingaKalinga KingdomKalingas
An analysis of various historical sources - including the ancient Greek accounts, the Puranas, and the Hathigumpha inscription - suggests that the Nandas controlled eastern India, the Ganges valley, and at least a part of Kalinga. The Kshatriyas said to have been exterminated by him include Maithalas, Kasheyas, Ikshvakus, Panchalas, Shurasenas, Kurus, Haihayas, Vitihotras, Kalingas, and Ashmakas.
Assuming that Nandaraja refers to a king of the Nanda dynasty, it appears that Kalinga region was annexed by the Nandas at some point.

Panchala

PanchalasPancalaPanchal
The Kshatriyas said to have been exterminated by him include Maithalas, Kasheyas, Ikshvakus, Panchalas, Shurasenas, Kurus, Haihayas, Vitihotras, Kalingas, and Ashmakas.
Panchala was annexed into the Magadha empire during the reign of Mahapadma Nanda in the mid-4th century BCE.

Conquest of the Nanda Empire

conquer the Nanda Empireconqueredoverthrown
The Nanda dynasty was overthrown by Chandragupta Maurya, who was supported by his mentor (and later minister) Chanakya.
The conquest of the Nanda Empire under Dhana Nanda by a force under Chandragupta Maurya in the 4th century BC led to the establishment of the Maurya Empire.

Torana

toranarchwayspandols
A granite stone fragment of an arch discovered by K. P. Jayaswal from Kumhrar, Pataliputra has been analysed as a pre Maurya-Nanda period keystone fragment of a trefoil arch of gateway with mason's marks of three archaic Brahmi letters inscribed on it which probably decorated a Torana.
A granite stone fragment of an arch discovered by K. P. Jayaswal from Kumhrar, Pataliputra has been analysed as a pre Mauryan Nanda period keystone fragment of a trefoil arch of gateway with mason's marks of three archaic Brahmi letters inscribed on it which probably decorated a torana.

Mamulanar

Māmoolanār
A verse by the Tamil poet Mamulanar refers to "the untold wealth of the Nandas", which was "swept away and submerged later on by the floods of the Ganges".
Also, his writing about the Mauryas and Nandas indicated that he must have lived before 320 BCE.