Nasal consonant

NasalNasalsnasal consonantsnasal stopnasal stopsvoiceless nasalnasal occlusive nasal nasal sound(Pre)nasal stop
In phonetics, a nasal, also called a nasal occlusive or nasal stop in contrast with an oral stop or nasalized consonant, is an occlusive consonant produced with a lowered velum, allowing air to escape freely through the nose.wikipedia
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Stop consonant

PlosiveStopstops
In phonetics, a nasal, also called a nasal occlusive or nasal stop in contrast with an oral stop or nasalized consonant, is an occlusive consonant produced with a lowered velum, allowing air to escape freely through the nose.
Stops contrast with nasals, where the vocal tract is blocked but airflow continues through the nose, as in and, and with fricatives, where partial occlusion impedes but does not block airflow in the vocal tract.

Consonant

consonantsCconsonantal
In phonetics, a nasal, also called a nasal occlusive or nasal stop in contrast with an oral stop or nasalized consonant, is an occlusive consonant produced with a lowered velum, allowing air to escape freely through the nose.
Examples are, pronounced with the lips;, pronounced with the front of the tongue;, pronounced with the back of the tongue;, pronounced in the throat; and, pronounced by forcing air through a narrow channel (fricatives); and and, which have air flowing through the nose (nasals).

Occlusive

occlusionocclusivesPlosives
In phonetics, a nasal, also called a nasal occlusive or nasal stop in contrast with an oral stop or nasalized consonant, is an occlusive consonant produced with a lowered velum, allowing air to escape freely through the nose.
Some of the Chimakuan, Salishan, and Wakashan languages near Puget Sound lack nasal occlusives and, as does the Rotokas language of Papua New Guinea.

Nasalization

nasalizednasalnasalisation
In phonetics, a nasal, also called a nasal occlusive or nasal stop in contrast with an oral stop or nasalized consonant, is an occlusive consonant produced with a lowered velum, allowing air to escape freely through the nose.
Nasality is usually seen as a binary feature, although surface variation in different degrees of nasality caused by neighboring nasal consonants has been observed.

Sonorant

sonorantssonorant consonantResonant
In terms of acoustics, nasals are sonorants, which means that they do not significantly restrict the escape of air (as it can freely escape out the nose).
Vowels are sonorants, as are consonants like and : approximants, nasals, flaps or taps, and most trills.

Oral consonant

oraloral sounds
The vast majority of consonants are oral consonants.
An oral consonant is a consonant sound in speech that is made by allowing air to escape from the mouth, as opposed to the nose, as in a nasal consonant.

Phonetics

phoneticphoneticallyphonetician
In phonetics, a nasal, also called a nasal occlusive or nasal stop in contrast with an oral stop or nasalized consonant, is an occlusive consonant produced with a lowered velum, allowing air to escape freely through the nose.
Nasals (sometimes referred to as nasal stops) are consonants in which there's a closure in the oral cavity and the velum is lowered, allowing air to flow through the nose.

Manner of articulation

articulationmanners of articulationspeech
In phonetics, a nasal, also called a nasal occlusive or nasal stop in contrast with an oral stop or nasalized consonant, is an occlusive consonant produced with a lowered velum, allowing air to escape freely through the nose.
It is most commonly found in nasal occlusives and nasal vowels, but nasalized fricatives, taps, and approximants are also found.

Spanish language

SpanishSpanish-languageCastilian
The voiced palatal nasal is a common sound in European languages, such as: Spanish, French and Italian, Catalan and Hungarian, Czech and Slovak, Polish, Occitan and Portuguese, and (before a vowel) Modern Greek.
The Spanish consonant system is characterized by (1) three nasal phonemes, and one or two (depending on the dialect) lateral phoneme(s), which in syllable-final position lose their contrast and are subject to assimilation to a following consonant; (2) three voiceless stops and the affricate ; (3) three or four (depending on the dialect) voiceless fricatives; (4) a set of voiced obstruents—,, and sometimes —which alternate between approximant and plosive allophones depending on the environment; and (5) a phonemic distinction between the "tapped" and "trilled" r-sounds (single and double in orthography).

English language

EnglishEnglish-languageen
Examples of nasals in English are, and, in words such as nose, bring and mouth. Many Germanic languages, including German, Dutch, English and Swedish, as well as varieties of Chinese such as Mandarin and Cantonese, have, and.

Burmese language

BurmeseMyanmarMyanmar language
Voiceless nasals occur in a few languages such as Burmese, Welsh, Icelandic and Guaraní.

Czech language

CzechcsCzech-language
The voiced palatal nasal is a common sound in European languages, such as: Spanish, French and Italian, Catalan and Hungarian, Czech and Slovak, Polish, Occitan and Portuguese, and (before a vowel) Modern Greek.

Nasal palatal approximant

J̃ j̃ j̇̃J̃ j̇̃
In Brazilian Portuguese and Angolan Portuguese, written, is typically pronounced as, a nasal palatal approximant, a nasal glide (in Polish, this feature is also possible as an allophone).
* It is a nasal consonant, which means air is allowed to escape through the nose, in this case in addition to through the mouth.

Japanese phonology

Japanesephonological reasonsJapanese pronunciation
The Japanese syllabary kana ん, typically romanized as n and occasionally m, can manifest as one of several different nasal consonants depending on what consonant follows it; this allophone, colloquially written in IPA as, is known as the moraic nasal, per the language's moraic structure.

Welsh language

WelshWelsh-languageWelsh-speaking
Voiceless nasals occur in a few languages such as Burmese, Welsh, Icelandic and Guaraní.
The voiceless alveolar lateral fricative, the voiceless nasals, and, and the voiceless alveolar trill are distinctive features of the Welsh language.

Hungarian language

HungarianMagyarHungarian-language
The voiced palatal nasal is a common sound in European languages, such as: Spanish, French and Italian, Catalan and Hungarian, Czech and Slovak, Polish, Occitan and Portuguese, and (before a vowel) Modern Greek.

Kana

Japanese syllabaryJapanese KanaJapanese syllabaries
The Japanese syllabary kana ん, typically romanized as n and occasionally m, can manifest as one of several different nasal consonants depending on what consonant follows it; this allophone, colloquially written in IPA as, is known as the moraic nasal, per the language's moraic structure.
Apart from the five vowels, this is always CV (consonant onset with vowel nucleus), such as ka, ki, etc., or V (vowel), such as a, i, etc., with the sole exception of the C grapheme for nasal codas usually romanised as n.

Polish language

PolishplPolish-language
The voiced palatal nasal is a common sound in European languages, such as: Spanish, French and Italian, Catalan and Hungarian, Czech and Slovak, Polish, Occitan and Portuguese, and (before a vowel) Modern Greek. In Brazilian Portuguese and Angolan Portuguese, written, is typically pronounced as, a nasal palatal approximant, a nasal glide (in Polish, this feature is also possible as an allophone).

French language

FrenchfrancophoneFrench-language
The voiced palatal nasal is a common sound in European languages, such as: Spanish, French and Italian, Catalan and Hungarian, Czech and Slovak, Polish, Occitan and Portuguese, and (before a vowel) Modern Greek.

Catalan language

CatalanCatalan-languageca
The voiced palatal nasal is a common sound in European languages, such as: Spanish, French and Italian, Catalan and Hungarian, Czech and Slovak, Polish, Occitan and Portuguese, and (before a vowel) Modern Greek.

Dental, alveolar and postalveolar nasals

alveolar nasalndental nasal
The symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet that represents dental, alveolar, and postalveolar nasals is, and the equivalent X-SAMPA symbol is.

Nasal vowel

nasalnasal vowelsnasalized
However, there are also nasalized fricatives, nasalized flaps, nasal glides, and nasal vowels, as in French, Portuguese, and Polish.
In most languages, vowels adjacent to nasal consonants are produced partially or fully with a lowered velum in a natural process of assimilation and are therefore technically nasal, but few speakers would notice.

Labiodental nasal

ɱ
The might be better characterized as a labiodental nasal approximant than as a nasal occlusive.

Swedish language

SwedishSwedish-languageSwedish-speaking
Many Germanic languages, including German, Dutch, English and Swedish, as well as varieties of Chinese such as Mandarin and Cantonese, have, and.

Italian language

ItalianItalian-languageit
The voiced palatal nasal is a common sound in European languages, such as: Spanish, French and Italian, Catalan and Hungarian, Czech and Slovak, Polish, Occitan and Portuguese, and (before a vowel) Modern Greek.