A report on Natchez–Vidalia Bridge

The Natchez–Vidalia Bridge are two twin cantilever bridges carrying U.S. Route 84, and 425 across the Mississippi River between Vidalia, Louisiana and Natchez, Mississippi.

- Natchez–Vidalia Bridge

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Vidalia, Louisiana

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Largest city and the parish seat of Concordia Parish, Louisiana, United States.

Largest city and the parish seat of Concordia Parish, Louisiana, United States.

Natchez-Vidalia Bridge over Mississippi River

The city of Natchez, Mississippi, lies on the opposite bank of the river, connected by the Natchez–Vidalia Bridge, carrying U.S. Routes 65, 84, and 425.

Western terminus at US 160 in Pagosa Springs, CO

U.S. Route 84

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East–west U.S. Highway that started as a short Georgia–Alabama route in the original 1926 scheme.

East–west U.S. Highway that started as a short Georgia–Alabama route in the original 1926 scheme.

Western terminus at US 160 in Pagosa Springs, CO
BNSF freight train running parallel to US 84 while crossing the Llano Estacado
US 84 is known in Lubbock as Avenue Q, a major downtown thoroughfare.
US 84 sign north of Snyder
Abandoned section of US 84 east of Jena
End US Route 84/Georgia State Route 38 sign at Interstate 95 east of Midway, Georgia.

The four-laned Natchez–Vidalia Bridge, crossing the Mississippi River, carries US 84 into Natchez.

Along US 425 north of Star City

U.S. Route 425

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North–south United States highway that travels in the U.S. states of Mississippi, Louisiana, and Arkansas.

North–south United States highway that travels in the U.S. states of Mississippi, Louisiana, and Arkansas.

Along US 425 north of Star City

The route travels northwest through the city concurrent with US 84 to the Natchez–Vidalia Bridge, along which the two routes cross the Mississippi River into Louisiana.

Mississippi River

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Second-longest river and chief river of the second-largest drainage system on the North American continent, second only to the Hudson Bay drainage system.

Second-longest river and chief river of the second-largest drainage system on the North American continent, second only to the Hudson Bay drainage system.

The beginning of the Mississippi River at Lake Itasca (2004)
Former head of navigation, St. Anthony Falls, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Confluence of the Wisconsin and Mississippi Rivers, viewed from Wyalusing State Park in Wisconsin
The Upper Mississippi River at its confluence with the Missouri River north of St. Louis
The confluence of the Mississippi (left) and Ohio (right) rivers at Cairo, Illinois, the demarcation between the Middle and the Lower Mississippi River
Lower Mississippi River near New Orleans
Map of the Mississippi River watershed
Sequence of NASA MODIS images showing the outflow of fresh water from the Mississippi (arrows) into the Gulf of Mexico (2004)
View along the former riverbed at the Tennessee/Arkansas state line near Reverie, Tennessee (2007)
In Minnesota, the Mississippi River runs through the Twin Cities (2007)
Community of boathouses on the Mississippi River in Winona, MN (2006)
The Mississippi River at the Chain of Rocks just north of St. Louis (2005)
A low-water dam deepens the pool above the Chain of Rocks Lock near St. Louis (2006)
The Stone Arch Bridge, the Third Avenue Bridge and the Hennepin Avenue Bridge in Minneapolis (2004)
The Dubuque-Wisconsin Bridge (2004)
The Chain of Rocks Bridge at St. Louis, Missouri
The Hernando de Soto Bridge in Memphis, Tennessee (2009)
Vicksburg Bridge
Towboat and barges at Memphis, Tennessee
Ships on the lower part of the Mississippi
Oil tanker on the Lower Mississippi near the Port of New Orleans
Barge on the Lower Mississippi River
Lock and Dam No. 11, north of Dubuque, Iowa (2007)
Lock and Dam No. 2, near Hastings, Minnesota (2007)
Lock and Dam No. 15, is the largest roller dam in the world Davenport, Iowa; Rock Island, Illinois. (1990)
Formation of the Atchafalaya River and construction of the Old River Control Structure.
Project design flood flow capacity for the Mississippi river in thousands of cubic feet per second.
Soldiers of the Missouri Army National Guard sandbag the River in Clarksville, Missouri, June 2008, following flooding.
Discovery of the Mississippi by De Soto A.D. 1541 by William Henry Powell depicts Hernando de Soto and Spanish Conquistadores seeing the Mississippi River for the first time.
Map of the French settlements (blue) in North America in 1750, before the French and Indian War (1754 to 1763).
Ca. 1681 map of Marquette and Jolliet's 1673 expedition.
Route of the Marquette-Jolliete Expedition of 1673
A Home on the Mississippi (1871)
Shifting sand bars made early navigation difficult.
Battle of Vicksburg (ca. 1888)
Mississippi River from Eunice, Arkansas, a settlement destroyed by gunboats during the Civil War.
Campsite at the river in Arkansas
The Old River Control Structure complex. View is to the east-southeast, looking downriver on the Mississippi, with the three dams across channels of the Atchafalaya River to the right of the Mississippi. Concordia Parish, Louisiana is in the foreground, on the right, and Wilkinson County, Mississippi, is in the background, across the Mississippi on the left.
Great River Road in Wisconsin near Lake Pepin (2005)
The American paddlefish is an ancient relict from the Mississippi
The source of the Mississippi River at Lake Itasca

Natchez-Vidalia Bridge