National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics

NACAits predecessorNASA's Advisory CouncilChairmen of the National Advisory Committee for AeronauticsNACA 64National Adviser Committee for AeronauticsSafety Advisory Group for Space Flight
The National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) was a U.S. federal agency founded on March 3, 1915, to undertake, promote, and institutionalize aeronautical research.wikipedia
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NASA

National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationNational Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)space program
On October 1, 1958, the agency was dissolved, and its assets and personnel transferred to the newly created National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA).
NASA was established in 1958, succeeding the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA).

Bell X-1

X-1Bell X-1ABell X1
NACA was also key in developing the area rule that is used on all modern supersonic aircraft, and conducted the key compressibility research that enabled the Bell X-1 to break the sound barrier. Although the Bell X-1 was commissioned by the Air Force and flown by Air Force test pilot Chuck Yeager, when it exceeded Mach 1 NACA was officially in charge of the testing and development of the aircraft.
The Bell X-1 is a rocket-engine–powered aircraft, designated originally as the XS-1, and was a joint National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics–U.S. Army Air Forces–U.S. Air Force supersonic research project built by Bell Aircraft.

NACA duct

NACA ductsNACANACA flush inlet
Among other advancements, NACA research and development produced the NACA duct, a type of air intake used in modern automotive applications, the NACA cowling, and several series of NACA airfoils which are still used in aircraft manufacturing.
A NACA duct, also sometimes called a NACA scoop or NACA inlet, is a common form of low-drag air inlet design, originally developed by the U.S. National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), the precursor to NASA, in 1945.

North American P-51 Mustang

P-51 MustangP-51Mustang
During World War II, NACA was described as "The Force Behind Our Air Supremacy" due to its key role in producing working superchargers for high altitude bombers, and for producing the laminar wing profiles for the North American P-51 Mustang.
One was a wing designed using laminar flow airfoils, which were developed co-operatively by North American Aviation and the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA).

NACA airfoil

NACA 4415NACA 23012NACA 23112
Among other advancements, NACA research and development produced the NACA duct, a type of air intake used in modern automotive applications, the NACA cowling, and several series of NACA airfoils which are still used in aircraft manufacturing.
The NACA airfoils are airfoil shapes for aircraft wings developed by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA).

Advisory Committee for Aeronautics

Aeronautical Research CommitteeAeronautical Research CouncilAeronautics Research Council
The most influential agency upon which the NACA was based was the British Advisory Committee for Aeronautics.
Following the establishment of this committee, other countries created similar agencies, notably the French L’Etablissement Central de l’Aérostation Militaire in Meudon (now Office National d'Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiales), the Russian "Aerodynamic Institute of Koutchino" and the U.S.A.'s National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, founded in 1915.

NACA cowling

cowlingengine cowlNACA
Among other advancements, NACA research and development produced the NACA duct, a type of air intake used in modern automotive applications, the NACA cowling, and several series of NACA airfoils which are still used in aircraft manufacturing.
The NACA cowling is a type of aerodynamic fairing used to streamline radial engines for use on airplanes and developed by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics in 1927.

Ames Research Center

NASA Ames Research CenterNASA AmesARC
Ames Aeronautical Laboratory (Moffett Field)
It was founded in 1939 as the second National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) laboratory.

Langley Research Center

NASA Langley Research CenterLangleyLangley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory
Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory (Hampton, Virginia)
Established in 1917 by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), the research center devotes two-thirds of its programs to aeronautics, and the rest to space.

Area rule

area-ruledarea-rulingarea-rule
NACA was also key in developing the area rule that is used on all modern supersonic aircraft, and conducted the key compressibility research that enabled the Bell X-1 to break the sound barrier. In 1951, NACA Engineer Richard Whitcomb determined the area rule that explained transonic flow over an aircraft.
Richard T. Whitcomb, after whom the rule is named, independently discovered this rule in 1952, while working at the NACA.

Armstrong Flight Research Center

NASA DrydenFlight Research CenterDryden
Muroc Flight Test Unit (Edwards Air Force Base)
It has also previously been known as the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics Muroc Flight Test Unit (1946), the NACA High-Speed Flight Research Station (1949), the NACA High-Speed Flight Station (1954), the NASA High-Speed Flight Station (1958) and the NASA Flight Research Center (1959).

Variable Density Tunnel

Langley two-dimensional low-turbulence pressure tunnel
2) Variable Density Tunnel (1922)
The Variable Density Tunnel (VDT) was the second wind tunnel at the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) Langley Research Center.

Lockheed P-38 Lightning

P-38P-38 LightningP-38 Lightnings
On the other hand, NACA's 1941 refusal to increase airspeed in their wind tunnels set Lockheed back a year in their quest to solve the problem of compressibility encountered in high speed dives made by the Lockheed P-38 Lightning.
Johnson said in his autobiography that he pleaded with NACA to do model tests in its wind tunnel.

Edwards Air Force Base

Edwards AFBEdwardsMuroc Army Air Field
Muroc Flight Test Unit (Edwards Air Force Base)
Armstrong's history dates back to late 1946, when 13 engineers arrived at what is now Edwards from the NACA Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory in Virginia to support the last supersonic research flights by the X-1 rocket plane in a joint NACA, Army Air Forces and Bell Aircraft program.

Curtiss P-40 Warhawk

P-40P-40 KittyhawkCurtiss P-40
The offered P-40 Tomahawk fighters were considered too outdated to be a feasible front line fighter by European standards, and so North American began development of a new aircraft.
Seeing little gain, Kelsey ordered the aircraft to be evaluated in a NACA wind tunnel to identify solutions for better aerodynamic qualities.

William F. Durand

William Frederick Durand
2) William F. Durand (Stanford University) (1916–1918)
He was the first civilian chair of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, the forerunner of NASA.

George P. Scriven

George Percival Scriven
1) George P. Scriven (United States Army) (1915–1916)
Scriven was first Chairman of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (1915–1916), the forerunner of NASA.

Richard T. Whitcomb

Richard WhitcombWhitcomb, Richard T.Whitcomb
In 1951, NACA Engineer Richard Whitcomb determined the area rule that explained transonic flow over an aircraft.
He was employed at the Langley Research Center operated by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) and its successor, NASA.

North American X-15

X-15X-15 rocket planeNorth American X-15A-2
NACA also participated in development of the first aircraft to fly to the "edge of space", North American's X-15.
The X-15 was based on a concept study from Walter Dornberger for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) for a hypersonic research aircraft.

Chuck Yeager

Charles "Chuck" YeagerCharles E. "Chuck" YeagerCharles E. Yeager
Although the Bell X-1 was commissioned by the Air Force and flown by Air Force test pilot Chuck Yeager, when it exceeded Mach 1 NACA was officially in charge of the testing and development of the aircraft.
After Bell Aircraft test pilot Chalmers "Slick" Goodlin demanded $150,000 ($1.6 million in 2015 dollars) to break the sound "barrier," the USAAF selected Yeager to fly the rocket-powered Bell XS-1 in a NACA program to research high-speed flight.

Vannevar Bush

Bush, Vannevar Bush, VannevarBush
6) Vannevar Bush (Carnegie Institution) (1940–1941)
Bush was appointed to the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) in 1938, and soon became its chairman.

Joseph Sweetman Ames

Joseph S. AmesJoseph AmesDr. Joeseph S. Ames
5) Joseph Sweetman Ames (Johns Hopkins University) (1927–1939)
He is best remembered as one of the founding members of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA, the predecessor of NASA) and its longtime chairman (1919–1939).

John Ripley Freeman

John R. FreemanJohn Freeman
3) John R. Freeman (consultant) (1918–1919)
He was a member of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics during World War I, and served as chairman from 1918–1919.

Hampton, Virginia

HamptonHampton, VAHampton City
Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory (Hampton, Virginia)
Roy F. Brissenden, World War II pilot, physicist, aeronautical engineer, mechanical engineer, teacher, inventor, project leader at Hampton, Langley Research Center NACA/NASA

Robert R. Gilruth

Bob GilruthGilruth, Robert R.Robert Gilruth
He worked for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics from 1937 to 1958 and its successor NASA, until his retirement in 1973.