National Center for Supercomputing Applications

NCSANational Center for Supercomputer Applications
The National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) is a state-federal partnership to develop and deploy national-scale cyberinfrastructure that advances research, science and engineering based in the United States of America.wikipedia
179 Related Articles

University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign

University of IllinoisUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignIllinois
NCSA operates as a unit of the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Donna Cox, leader of the Advanced Visualization Laboratory at NCSA and a professor in the School of Art and Design at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, and her team created visualizations for the Oscar-nominated IMAX film "Cosmic Voyage", the PBS NOVA episodes "Hunt for the Supertwister" and "Runaway Universe", as well as Discovery Channel documentaries and pieces for CNN and NBC Nightly News.
The university also hosts the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) and is home to the fastest supercomputer on a university campus.

Bill Gropp

William D. GroppWilliam Gropp
NCSA is led by Bill Gropp.
William Douglas "Bill" Gropp is the director of the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) and the Thomas M. Siebel Chair in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign.

Blue Waters

Blue Waters petascale supercomputer
In 2007, NCSA was awarded a grant from the National Science Foundation to build "Blue Waters", a supercomputer capable of performing quadrillions of calculations per second, a level of performance known as petascale.
Blue Waters is a petascale supercomputer at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

NCSA Telnet

NCSA quickly came to the attention of the worldwide scientific community with the release of NCSA Telnet in 1986.
NCSA Telnet is an implementation of the Telnet protocol created at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign National Center for Supercomputing Applications in 1986 and continuously developed until 1995.

National Science Foundation

NSFNational Science Foundation (NSF)U.S. National Science Foundation
In 2007, NCSA was awarded a grant from the National Science Foundation to build "Blue Waters", a supercomputer capable of performing quadrillions of calculations per second, a level of performance known as petascale. Support for NCSA comes from the National Science Foundation,
In 1993 students and staff at the NSF-supported National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, developed Mosaic, the first freely available browser to allow World Wide Web pages that include both graphics and text.

World Wide Web

WebWWWthe web
Today's computers are easy to use, and the web is omnipresent. In 1993, NCSA released the Mosaic web browser, the first popular graphical Web browser, which played an important part in expanding the growth of the World Wide Web.
Historians generally agree that a turning point for the Web began with the introduction of the Mosaic web browser in 1993, a graphical browser developed by a team at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign (NCSA-UIUC), led by Marc Andreessen.

Mosaic (web browser)

MosaicNCSA MosaicMosaic web browser
In 1993, NCSA released the Mosaic web browser, the first popular graphical Web browser, which played an important part in expanding the growth of the World Wide Web.
Mosaic was developed at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign beginning in late 1992.

Netscape

Netscape Communications CorporationNetscape CommunicationsNetscape Communications Corp.
NCSA Mosaic was written by Marc Andreessen and Eric Bina, who went on to develop the Netscape Web browser.
This browser was subsequently renamed Netscape Navigator, and the company took the "Netscape" name (coined by employee Greg Sands, although it was also a trademark of Cisco Systems ) on November 14, 1994, to avoid trademark ownership problems with NCSA, where the initial Netscape employees had previously created the NCSA Mosaic web browser.

Marc Andreessen

Marc Andreesen
NCSA Mosaic was written by Marc Andreessen and Eric Bina, who went on to develop the Netscape Web browser.
He also worked at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at the University of Illinois, where he became familiar with Tim Berners-Lee's open standards for the World Wide Web.

Larry Smarr

Larry L. SmarrSmarr
The idea for NCSA and the four other supercomputer centers arose from the frustration of its founder, Larry Smarr, who wrote an influential paper, "The Supercomputer Famine in American Universities", in 1982, after having to travel to Europe in summertime to access supercomputers and conduct his research.
In 1985 Smarr became the first director of the Illinois center, the National Center for Supercomputing Applications.

NCSA HTTPd

HTTPdmost commonly used web server software
The server-complement was called NCSA HTTPd, which later became known as Apache HTTP Server.
NCSA HTTPd is an early, now discontinued, web server originally developed at the NCSA at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign by Robert McCool and others.

Internet Explorer

Microsoft Internet ExplorerIEMSIE
Mosaic was later licensed to Spyglass, Inc. which provided the foundation for Internet Explorer.
The Internet Explorer project was started in the summer of 1994 by Thomas Reardon, who, according to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Review of 2003, used source code from Spyglass, Inc. Mosaic, which was an early commercial web browser with formal ties to the pioneering National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) Mosaic browser.

Eric Bina

NCSA Mosaic was written by Marc Andreessen and Eric Bina, who went on to develop the Netscape Web browser.
In 1993, Bina along with Marc Andreessen authored the first version of Mosaic while working as a programmer at National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Donna Cox

Donna Cox, leader of the Advanced Visualization Laboratory at NCSA and a professor in the School of Art and Design at the University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, and her team created visualizations for the Oscar-nominated IMAX film "Cosmic Voyage", the PBS NOVA episodes "Hunt for the Supertwister" and "Runaway Universe", as well as Discovery Channel documentaries and pieces for CNN and NBC Nightly News.
Donna J. Cox is an American artist and scientist, Michael Aiken Endowded Chair; Professor of Art + Design; Director, Advanced Scientific Visualization Laboratory at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC); Director, Visualization and Experimental Technologies at National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA); and Director, edream (Illinois Emerging Digital Research and Education in Arts Media Institute).

NCSA Brown Dog

Brown Dog
It is supported by the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) that is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF).

Cyberinfrastructure

e-infrastructuree-InfrastructureseInfrastructure
This project has now evolved to the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) project, led by the National Center for Supercomputing Applications.

Visualization (graphics)

visualizationKnowledge visualizationvisualisation
The proposal's vision of the computing future were then unusual or non-existent, but elements of it are now commonplace, such as visualization, workstations, high-speed I/O, data storage, software engineering, and close collaboration with the multi-disciplinary user community.

Workstation

workstationscomputer workstationUnix workstation
The proposal's vision of the computing future were then unusual or non-existent, but elements of it are now commonplace, such as visualization, workstations, high-speed I/O, data storage, software engineering, and close collaboration with the multi-disciplinary user community.

Input/output

I/Ooutputinterface
The proposal's vision of the computing future were then unusual or non-existent, but elements of it are now commonplace, such as visualization, workstations, high-speed I/O, data storage, software engineering, and close collaboration with the multi-disciplinary user community.

Computer data storage

main memorystoragememory
The proposal's vision of the computing future were then unusual or non-existent, but elements of it are now commonplace, such as visualization, workstations, high-speed I/O, data storage, software engineering, and close collaboration with the multi-disciplinary user community.

Software engineering

software engineersoftware engineerssoftware
The proposal's vision of the computing future were then unusual or non-existent, but elements of it are now commonplace, such as visualization, workstations, high-speed I/O, data storage, software engineering, and close collaboration with the multi-disciplinary user community.

Collaboration

collaborativecollaboratecollaborated
The proposal's vision of the computing future were then unusual or non-existent, but elements of it are now commonplace, such as visualization, workstations, high-speed I/O, data storage, software engineering, and close collaboration with the multi-disciplinary user community.