National Endowment for the Arts

NEANational Endowment of the ArtsThe National Endowment for the ArtsNEA FellowshipNational Endowment for the Arts FellowshipNational Endowments for the ArtsNational Endowment for the Arts (NEA)National Council on the ArtsNational EndowmentNational Endowment for the Arts Creative Writing Fellowship
The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) is an independent agency of the United States federal government that offers support and funding for projects exhibiting artistic excellence.wikipedia
3,200 Related Articles

Tony Honors for Excellence in Theatre

Tony HonorTony Honor for Excellence in TheatreTony Honors for Excellence
The NEA has its offices in Washington, D.C. It was awarded Tony Honors for Excellence in Theatre in 1995, as well as the Special Tony Award in 2016.

NEA Jazz Masters

NEA Jazz MasterNEA Jazz Masters AwardJazz Master
The NEA Jazz Masters Fellowships are awarded to individuals who have made significant contributions to the art of jazz.
The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA), every year honors up to seven jazz musicians with Jazz Master Awards.

NEA Four

In 1996, Congress cut the NEA funding to $99.5 million as a result of pressure from conservative groups, including the American Family Association, who criticized the agency for using tax dollars to fund highly controversial artists such as Barbara DeGenevieve, Andres Serrano, Robert Mapplethorpe, and the performance artists known as the "NEA Four".
The "NEA Four", Karen Finley, Tim Miller, John Fleck, and Holly Hughes, were performance artists whose proposed grants from the United States government's National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) were vetoed by John Frohnmayer in June 1990.

Robert Mapplethorpe

MapplethorpeRobert MaplethorpeMapplethorpe obscenity trial
In 1996, Congress cut the NEA funding to $99.5 million as a result of pressure from conservative groups, including the American Family Association, who criticized the agency for using tax dollars to fund highly controversial artists such as Barbara DeGenevieve, Andres Serrano, Robert Mapplethorpe, and the performance artists known as the "NEA Four".
The ICA was awarded a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts to support Mapplethorpe's exhibit at the Corcoran Gallery of Art.

Jesse Helms

Senator Jesse HelmsSenator Helmscontroversies
Republican Senators Jesse Helms and Al D'Amato began to rally against the NEA, and expanded the attack to include other artists.
He fought what he considered to be liberalism whenever it was on the agenda, opposing civil rights, disability rights, feminism, gay rights, affirmative action, access to abortions, the Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA), and the National Endowment for the Arts.

American Family Association

One Million MomsNational Federation for DecencyAFA
In 1996, Congress cut the NEA funding to $99.5 million as a result of pressure from conservative groups, including the American Family Association, who criticized the agency for using tax dollars to fund highly controversial artists such as Barbara DeGenevieve, Andres Serrano, Robert Mapplethorpe, and the performance artists known as the "NEA Four".
The AFA has repeatedly lobbied Congress to eliminate funding for the National Endowment for the Arts.

Piss Christ

Immersion (Piss Christ)Pisschrist
The work at the center of the controversy was Piss Christ, a photo of a plastic crucifix submerged in a vial of an amber fluid described by the artist as his own urine.
The piece was a winner of the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art's "Awards in the Visual Arts" competition, which was sponsored in part by the National Endowment for the Arts, a United States Government agency that offers support and funding for artistic projects.

Barbara DeGenevieve

In 1996, Congress cut the NEA funding to $99.5 million as a result of pressure from conservative groups, including the American Family Association, who criticized the agency for using tax dollars to fund highly controversial artists such as Barbara DeGenevieve, Andres Serrano, Robert Mapplethorpe, and the performance artists known as the "NEA Four".
DeGenevieve won awards from the National Endowment for the Arts (Visual Artist Fellowship); Art Matters Foundation Fellowship; and the Illinois Arts Council.

Washington Project for the Arts

WPAThe Washington Project for the ArtsWashington Projects for the Arts
The Washington Project for the Arts later hosted the Mapplethorpe show.
To support his programs, Nodal landed major grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the District of Columbia's Commission on the Arts and Humanities.

Special Tony Award

Lifetime Achievement in the TheatreLifetime Achievement Tony AwardSpecial Award
The NEA has its offices in Washington, D.C. It was awarded Tony Honors for Excellence in Theatre in 1995, as well as the Special Tony Award in 2016.

John Frohnmayer

John E. FrohnmayerJohn
The "NEA Four", Karen Finley, Tim Miller, John Fleck, and Holly Hughes, were performance artists whose proposed grants from the United States government's National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) were vetoed by John Frohnmayer in June 1990.
He was the fifth chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, a program of the United States government.

Holly Hughes (performance artist)

Holly HughesHughes, Holly
The "NEA Four", Karen Finley, Tim Miller, John Fleck, and Holly Hughes, were performance artists whose proposed grants from the United States government's National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) were vetoed by John Frohnmayer in June 1990.
She began as a feminist painter in New York City but is best known for her connection with the NEA Four, with whom she was denied funding from the National Endowment for the Arts, and for her work with the Women's One World Cafe.

National Endowment for the Arts v. Finley

The artists won their case in court in 1993 and were awarded amounts equal to the grant money in question, though the case would make its way to the United States Supreme Court in National Endowment for the Arts v. Finley.
National Endowment for the Arts v. Finley, 524 U.S. 569 (1998), was a United States Supreme Court case in which the Court ruled that the National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities Act, as amended in 1990, ( (d)(1)), which required the Chairperson of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) to ensure that "artistic excellence and artistic merit are the criteria by which [grant] applications are judged, taking into consideration general standards of decency and respect for the diverse beliefs and values of the American public" was facially valid, as it neither inherently interfered with First Amendment rights nor violated constitutional vagueness principles.

Karen Finley

The "NEA Four", Karen Finley, Tim Miller, John Fleck, and Holly Hughes, were performance artists whose proposed grants from the United States government's National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) were vetoed by John Frohnmayer in June 1990.
She was notably one of the NEA Four, four performance artists whose grants from the National Endowment for the Arts were vetoed in 1990 by John Frohnmayer after the process was condemned by Senator Jesse Helms under "decency" issues.

Tim Miller (performance artist)

Tim Miller
The "NEA Four", Karen Finley, Tim Miller, John Fleck, and Holly Hughes, were performance artists whose proposed grants from the United States government's National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) were vetoed by John Frohnmayer in June 1990.
He was one of the NEA Four, four performance artists whose National Endowment for the Arts grants were vetoed in 1990 by NEA chair John Frohnmayer.

National Endowment for the Humanities

NEHNational Council on the HumanitiesNEH Fellowship
Gingrich had called for the NEA to be eliminated completely along with the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.
NEH was created in 1965 under the National Foundation on the Arts and Humanities, which included the National Endowment for the Arts and later the Institute for Museum Services, as a move to provide greater investment in culture by the federal government.

Roger L. Stevens

Roger Stevens
He was the founding Chairman of both the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts (1961) and the National Endowment for the Arts (1965).

John Fleck (actor)

John Fleck
The "NEA Four", Karen Finley, Tim Miller, John Fleck, and Holly Hughes, were performance artists whose proposed grants from the United States government's National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) were vetoed by John Frohnmayer in June 1990.
In 1990 he and three of his fellow artists became embroiled in a lawsuit against the government's National Endowment for the Arts program.

Nancy Hanks (art historian)

Nancy HanksNancy Hanks (NEA)
Nancy Hanks (1927–1983) was the second chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA).

Jane Alexander

Jane Quigley
Jane Alexander (born October 28, 1939) is an American author, actress, and former director of the National Endowment for the Arts.

William Powhida

Artist William Powhida has noted that "in one single auction, wealthy collectors bought almost a billion dollars in contemporary art at Christie's in New York."
He further commented: "If you had a 2 percent tax just on the auctions in New York you could probably double the NEA budget in two nights."

Michael P. Hammond

Michael P. Hammond (June 13, 1932 – January 29, 2002) was an American musician, educator, and eighth chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts.

National Heritage Fellowship

National Heritage FellowNational Heritage AwardNational Heritage Fellows
Additionally, the NEA awards three Lifetime Honors: NEA National Heritage Fellowships to master folk and traditional artists, NEA Jazz Masters Fellowships to jazz musicians and advocates, and NEA Opera Honors to individuals who have made extraordinary contributions to opera in the United States.
The National Heritage Fellowship is a lifetime honor presented to master folk and traditional artists by the National Endowment for the Arts.

Dana Gioia

Gioia, Dana
He served as the chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) between 2003 and 2009.