National Firearms Act

US National Act Stamp, affixed to transfer forms to indicate tax paid.

The National Firearms Act (NFA), 73rd Congress, Sess.

- National Firearms Act
US National Act Stamp, affixed to transfer forms to indicate tax paid.

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A MAC-10 with a silencer. The silencer is treated as a Title II weapon or NFA firearm itself; the firearm to which the silencer is attached maintains its separate legal status as Title I or Title II. If a silencer is integral to a Title II weapon, such as an SBR, the entire weapon only counts as a single Title II item.

Title II weapons

A MAC-10 with a silencer. The silencer is treated as a Title II weapon or NFA firearm itself; the firearm to which the silencer is attached maintains its separate legal status as Title I or Title II. If a silencer is integral to a Title II weapon, such as an SBR, the entire weapon only counts as a single Title II item.
The USAS-12 automatic shotgun is a "destructive device".
The Serbu Super-Shorty pump-action shotgun, manufactured without a buttstock, is an AOW smooth-bore handgun, not an SBS.
A disguised firearm such as this cell phone gun is an AOW.

Title II weapons, or NFA firearms, are designations of certain weapons under the United States National Firearms Act (NFA).

A sawn-off break-open shotgun of the type commonly known as a lupara

Sawed-off shotgun

Type of shotgun with a shorter gun barrel—typically under 18 in—and often a shortened or absent stock.

Type of shotgun with a shorter gun barrel—typically under 18 in—and often a shortened or absent stock.

A sawn-off break-open shotgun of the type commonly known as a lupara
This short-barrelled shotgun was manufactured with a reduced-length barrel, rather than being modified after its manufacture.
Fabarm FP6 Entry – features a 14-inch barrel and is classified as a short-barrelled shotgun in the U.S.

Under the National Firearms Act (NFA), it is illegal for a private citizen to possess a sawed-off modern smokeless powder shotgun (a shotgun with a barrel length shorter than 18 in or a minimum overall length of the weapon, total, including the 18-inch minimum barrel, of under 26 in) (under U.S.C. Title II), without a tax-paid registration from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, requiring a background check and either a $200 or $5 tax for every transfer, depending upon the specific manufacturing circumstances of the particular sawed-off modern shotgun being transferred.

73rd United States Congress

Meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives.

Meeting of the legislative branch of the United States federal government, composed of the United States Senate and the United States House of Representatives.

President Franklin D. Roosevelt signs the Tennessee Valley Authority Act

June 6, 1934: The National Firearms Act of 1934 (ch. 757, ) regulated machine guns, short-barreled rifles and shotguns.

A case of silencers produced by Gemtech.

Silencer (firearms)

[[File:Suppressors.jpg|thumb|upright=1.35|Silenced firearms (without magazines) Top to bottom:• Uzi

[[File:Suppressors.jpg|thumb|upright=1.35|Silenced firearms (without magazines) Top to bottom:• Uzi

A case of silencers produced by Gemtech.
Cutaway silencer
Revolver with silencer. Gas can be seen escaping between barrel and cylinder
Cross-section drawing of a centerfire rifle silencer, showing expansion chamber "reflexed" (going back around) the rifle barrel, and four sound baffles. The diffractor and baffles are carefully shaped to deflect gas.
Cross-section drawing of a rimfire rifle silencer, showing short expansion chamber and thirteen plastic baffles. These baffles use alternating angled flat surfaces to repeatedly deflect gas expanding through the silencer. In the actual silencer, baffles are orientated at 90 degrees to one another about the axis of bullet travel. (The illustration does not demonstrate this well.)
Cross-section drawing of a pistol silencer, showing expansion chamber wrapped around inner suppressor assembly, and four wipes. The bullet pushes a bullet-diameter hole through the wipes, trapping propellant gas behind it entirely until the bullet has passed through the wipe completely
Cross-section of a silencer integral to the firearm
Firearm suppressor disassembled to show blast chamber, baffles, and sections of the outer tube
Silenced 12 gauge shotgun and 7.62×39 mm rifle
SilencerCo Osprey .45 silencer on a Springfield pistol
Rear of a silencer with the Nielsen device protruding (completely assembled)
Retaining ring unscrewed and Nielsen device partially removed
Nielsen device completely removed and disassembled
Rear of silencer showing the rotational indexing system incorporated into some Nielsen devices
Integral silencer on VSS Vintorez sniper rifle and AS Val assault rifle
Firearm silencers including the SilencerCo Osprey 9, SWR Octane 45, and SilencerCo Saker 5.56

The US National Firearms Act (NFA) of 1934 defined silencers and established regulations limiting their sale and ownership.

ATF Form 4590 ("Factoring Criteria for Weapons")

Gun Control Act of 1968

U.S. federal law that regulates the firearms industry and firearms ownership.

U.S. federal law that regulates the firearms industry and firearms ownership.

ATF Form 4590 ("Factoring Criteria for Weapons")

The National Firearms Act of 1934 (NFA) is Title II.

Governments issue driver's licenses to people who are allowed to drive motor vehicles on public roads.

Federal Firearms License

License in the United States that enables an individual or a company to engage in a business pertaining to the manufacture or importation of firearms and ammunition, or the interstate and intrastate sale of firearms.

License in the United States that enables an individual or a company to engage in a business pertaining to the manufacture or importation of firearms and ammunition, or the interstate and intrastate sale of firearms.

Governments issue driver's licenses to people who are allowed to drive motor vehicles on public roads.

Certain types of firearms, accessories and other weapons are currently restricted under the National Firearms Act (NFA).

AR-15-style rifles come in many sizes and have many options, depending on the manufacturer. The part shown bottom center is the lower receiver without the receiver extension, rear takedown pin, and buttstock.

AR-15 style rifle

Any lightweight semi-automatic rifle based on the Colt AR-15 design.

Any lightweight semi-automatic rifle based on the Colt AR-15 design.

AR-15-style rifles come in many sizes and have many options, depending on the manufacturer. The part shown bottom center is the lower receiver without the receiver extension, rear takedown pin, and buttstock.
1973 Colt AR-15 SP1 rifle with 'slab side' lower receiver (lacking raised boss around magazine release button) and original Colt 20-round box magazine
A stripped lower receiver, one that is lacking the additional parts included in a completed lower receiver, is the only part of an AR-15 style rifle that needs to be transferred through a federally licensed firearms dealer under United States federal law.
American Tactical OMNI AR-15 style rifle, (Lower in polymer), 5.56×45mm NATO caliber, with Millett DMS-1 scope and FAB Defense stock and grips

Civilian rifles commonly have 16 in or longer barrels to comply with the National Firearms Act.

From left to right: a .45 ACP, a .410 bore shotshell, a 20 gauge shotshell, and a 12 gauge shotshell

.410 bore

One of the smallest caliber of shotgun shell commonly available .

One of the smallest caliber of shotgun shell commonly available .

From left to right: a .45 ACP, a .410 bore shotshell, a 20 gauge shotshell, and a 12 gauge shotshell
Two .410 shells being loaded into a side-by-side, double-barrel shotgun
Firing Winchester Supreme Elite 410 shells loaded with three 71-grain disks and twelve BB shot into a melon
.410 bore M-35 shotgun shells for M6 survival rifle with .22 long rifle for comparison
H. Koon "Snake Charmer" advertisement
Original USAF M6 Survival Rifle/Shotgun, Caliber .22 Hornet/.410 Shotgun
Contender in 45 Colt/.410 with ventilated rib
A modern .45 Colt & .410 bore Bond Arms derringer
Smith and Wesson Governor with .45ACP, .45 Colt and .410 shotgun shells

With the short barrel, this is legally classified as an any other weapon in the United States, so the M6 Scout is made with 18.5 in barrels for civilian sales.

A 7.63 mm Mauser C96

Mauser C96

Semi-automatic pistol that was originally produced by German arms manufacturer Mauser from 1896 to 1937.

Semi-automatic pistol that was originally produced by German arms manufacturer Mauser from 1896 to 1937.

A 7.63 mm Mauser C96
An early C96 prototype
"Red 9" Mauser C96 with stock
Mauser C96 carbine
Mauser "Red 9" C96 with stripper clip
Mauser C96 M1920 Bolo in Tula State Arms Museum in 2016
Mauser M712 Schnellfeuer
Astra 900

The US National Firearms Act of 1934 placed a $200 tax on select-fire weapons ("machine guns"), making exports of the Schnellfeuer guns to the US impractical since at the time this was roughly half the cost of a new car.

A "sawn-off" Mauser 98

Short-barreled rifle

Unusually short barrel.

Unusually short barrel.

A "sawn-off" Mauser 98

While they are not considered NFA devices under the 1934 National Firearms Act, most are regulated by the Gun Control Act of 1968.