National Gallery of Victoria

NGVThe National Gallery of VictoriaNational GalleryMelbourneNGV InternationalVictoriaArt Gallery of VictoriaGallery of VictoriaMcArthur Gallery of the State Library of VictoriaMelbourne National Gallery
The National Gallery of Victoria, popularly known as the NGV, is an art museum in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.wikipedia
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Melbourne

Melbourne, AustraliaMelbourne, VictoriaGreater Melbourne
The National Gallery of Victoria, popularly known as the NGV, is an art museum in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
The city is home to many of the best-known cultural institutions in the nation, such as the Melbourne Cricket Ground, the National Gallery of Victoria and the World Heritage-listed Royal Exhibition Building.

Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia

Ian Potter CentreIan Potter FoundationNGV
The NGV houses an encyclopedic art collection across two sites: NGV International, located on St Kilda Road in the Melbourne Arts Precinct of Southbank, and the Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia, located nearby at Federation Square.
The Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia is an art gallery that houses the Australian part of the art collection of the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV).

National Gallery of Victoria Art School

National Gallery SchoolNational Gallery Art Schoolart school
The National Gallery of Victoria Art School, associated with the gallery, was founded in 1867 and remained the leading centre for academic art training in Australia until about 1910.
The National Gallery of Victoria Art School, associated with the National Gallery of Victoria, was a private fine arts college founded in 1867.

List of most visited art museums

List of most visited art museums in the worldmost visited art museum in the worldmost visited art museums in the world
Founded in 1861, it is Australia's oldest, largest and most visited art museum.

List of largest art museums

largestlargest art museums largest
Founded in 1861, it is Australia's oldest, largest and most visited art museum.

Federation Square

BMW EdgeDeakin EdgeFed Square
The NGV houses an encyclopedic art collection across two sites: NGV International, located on St Kilda Road in the Melbourne Arts Precinct of Southbank, and the Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia, located nearby at Federation Square. The Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia in Federation Square was designed by Lab Architecture Studio to house the NGV's Australian art collection.
The mix of occupants and tenants were soon modified, with the cinemedia centre becoming the new body known as ACMI, offices for multicultural broadcaster SBS added, and the gallery space becoming the Australian art wing of the National Gallery of Victoria, which became the Ian Potter Centre.

Roy Grounds

Sir Roy GroundsGroundsSir Roy Burman Grounds
The NGV International building, designed by Sir Roy Grounds, opened in 1968, and was redeveloped by Mario Bellini before reopening in 2003. In 1962, Roy Grounds split from his partners Frederick Romberg and Robin Boyd, retained the commission, and designed the gallery at 180 St Kilda Road (now known as NGV International).
In 1959 the firm was awarded the commission to design the National Gallery of Victoria and Arts Centre, with Grounds named in the contract as the architect in charge.

Robin Boyd (architect)

Robin BoydBoydRobin Gerard Penleigh Boyd
In 1962, Roy Grounds split from his partners Frederick Romberg and Robin Boyd, retained the commission, and designed the gallery at 180 St Kilda Road (now known as NGV International).
She had married Daryl Lindsay, director of the National Gallery of Victoria, 1942 to 1956, and brother to artist Lionel Lindsay and renowned artist and author Norman Lindsay.

Arts Centre Melbourne

Victorian Arts CentreThe Arts CentreMelbourne Arts Centre
In 2018 the State Government of Victoria announced a new contemporary art gallery would built behind the Arts Centre and the existing NGV International building.
It was designed by architect Roy Grounds, the masterplan for the complex (along with the National Gallery of Victoria) was approved in 1960 and construction began in 1973 following some delays.

Shearing the Rams

The 1880s saw the birth and development of the Heidelberg School (also known as Australian Impressionism) in the outer suburbs of Melbourne, and the NGV was well-placed to acquire some of the movement's key artworks, including Tom Roberts' Shearing the Rams (1890), Arthur Streeton's ‘The purple noon's transparent might’ (1896), and Frederick McCubbin's The Pioneer (1904).
It forms part of the National Gallery of Victoria's Australian art collection, held at the Ian Potter Centre in Federation Square, Melbourne.

Melbourne Arts Precinct

Arts PrecinctSouthbank Arts Precinct
The NGV houses an encyclopedic art collection across two sites: NGV International, located on St Kilda Road in the Melbourne Arts Precinct of Southbank, and the Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia, located nearby at Federation Square.

Henry Barkly

Sir Henry BarklyBarklyBarkly, Sir Henry
These works were displayed in the Museum of Art, opened by Governor Sir Henry Barkly in May 1861 on the lower floor of the south wing of the Public Library (now the State Library of Victoria) on Swanston Street.
He was a founder and president of the Royal Society of Victoria, 1860–63, and helped to found the National Gallery of Victoria, the Acclimatization Society and the National Observatory.

St Kilda Road, Melbourne

St Kilda RoadSt KildaSt Kilda Rd
The NGV houses an encyclopedic art collection across two sites: NGV International, located on St Kilda Road in the Melbourne Arts Precinct of Southbank, and the Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia, located nearby at Federation Square. In 1962, Roy Grounds split from his partners Frederick Romberg and Robin Boyd, retained the commission, and designed the gallery at 180 St Kilda Road (now known as NGV International).
Much of site was used as an outdoor carpark before construction of the National Gallery of Victoria commenced in the early 1960s.

Ian Potter

Sir Ian Potter Ian Potter Cultural Trust Award
The drive achieved its aim and secured $15 million from the Ian Potter Foundation on 11 July 2000, $3 million from Lotti Smorgon, $2 million from the Clemenger Foundation, and $1 million each from James Fairfax and the Pratt Foundation.
The Ian Potter Centre at Federation Square (part of the National Gallery of Victoria), the Ian Potter Museum of Art at the University of Melbourne and the Ian Potter Children's Garden at the Royal Botanic Gardens in Melbourne are named after him.

Heidelberg School

Australian ImpressionismAustralian ImpressionistAustralian Impressionists
The 1880s saw the birth and development of the Heidelberg School (also known as Australian Impressionism) in the outer suburbs of Melbourne, and the NGV was well-placed to acquire some of the movement's key artworks, including Tom Roberts' Shearing the Rams (1890), Arthur Streeton's ‘The purple noon's transparent might’ (1896), and Frederick McCubbin's The Pioneer (1904).
The artists are well-represented in Australia's major public galleries, including the National Gallery of Australia, the National Gallery of Victoria and the Art Gallery of New South Wales.

Nicholas Chevalier

N. Chevalier
Grand designs for a building fronting Lonsdale and Swanston streets were drawn by Nicholas Chevalier in 1860 and Frederick Grosse in 1865, featuring an enormous and elaborate library and gallery, but these visions were never realised.
In 1864, when the National Gallery of Victoria was founded, an exhibition of works by Victorian artists was held.

Southbank, Victoria

SouthbankSouthbank PromenadeSouthbank, Melbourne
The NGV houses an encyclopedic art collection across two sites: NGV International, located on St Kilda Road in the Melbourne Arts Precinct of Southbank, and the Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia, located nearby at Federation Square.
Despite being dominated by modern apartments and office towers Southbank has a number of significant heritage buildings existing in the Arts precinct, on the eastern end and along St Kilda Road, which includes former Repatriation Commission Outpatient Clinic, the Victorian Arts Centre and National Gallery of Victoria (1960s), parts of the Victorian College of the Arts campus as well as the Victoria Barracks and Malthouse Theatre.

The Pioneer (painting)

The PioneerThe Pioneer'' (painting)
The 1880s saw the birth and development of the Heidelberg School (also known as Australian Impressionism) in the outer suburbs of Melbourne, and the NGV was well-placed to acquire some of the movement's key artworks, including Tom Roberts' Shearing the Rams (1890), Arthur Streeton's ‘The purple noon's transparent might’ (1896), and Frederick McCubbin's The Pioneer (1904).
The painting is part of the National Gallery of Victoria's Australian art collection and exhibited in the Ian Potter Centre in Federation Square in Melbourne.

Joseph Brown Collection

A large number of works were donated by Dr. Joseph Brown in 2004 which form the Joseph Brown Collection.
The Joseph Brown Collection comprises works of art donated to the National Gallery of Victoria in 2004 by the collector and art dealer Joseph Brown.

State Library Victoria

State Library of VictoriaMelbourne Public LibraryState Library
These works were displayed in the Museum of Art, opened by Governor Sir Henry Barkly in May 1861 on the lower floor of the south wing of the Public Library (now the State Library of Victoria) on Swanston Street.
The National Gallery of Victoria moved to new buildings in St Kilda Road in 1968.

Leonard French

Leonard William French
One of the features of the building is the Leonard French stained glass ceiling, one of the world's largest pieces of suspended stained glass, which casts colourful light on the floor below.
His stained glass creations include a series of panels in the cafe and foyer of the National Library of Australia in Canberra, and a stained glass ceiling for the great hall at the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne, which is one of the largest in the world.

Alfred Felton

Felton BequestFelton
The most significant, the Felton Bequest, was established by the will of Alfred Felton and from 1904, has been used to purchase over 15,000 works of art.
The Bequest has been established to support culture and the community, with half the funding benefiting Victorian charities (particularly those that support women and children) and the other half used to acquire and donate art works to the National Gallery of Victoria.

Australian art

Art of AustraliaVisual arts of AustraliaAustralian
The Ian Potter Centre: NGV Australia in Federation Square was designed by Lab Architecture Studio to house the NGV's Australian art collection.
He remains notable for his artworks which recorded traditional Aboriginal ways for the education of Westerners (which remain on permanent exhibition at the Ian Potter Centre of the National Gallery of Victoria and at the Ballarat Fine Art Gallery).

Mario Bellini

Bellini
The NGV International building, designed by Sir Roy Grounds, opened in 1968, and was redeveloped by Mario Bellini before reopening in 2003.

Frederick Romberg

RombergGrounds, Romberg and Boyd
In 1962, Roy Grounds split from his partners Frederick Romberg and Robin Boyd, retained the commission, and designed the gallery at 180 St Kilda Road (now known as NGV International).
During the National Gallery of Victoria and Cultural Centre project, where the practice of Grounds, Romberg and Boyd was appointed as the architects; at a more personal level, it caused the breakup of the partnership.