National Institute of Standards and Technology

NISTNational Bureau of StandardsBureau of StandardsNational Institute for Standards and TechnologyNBSNational Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)United States Bureau of StandardsNational Institute of Standards & TechnologyU.S. Bureau of StandardsU.S. National Bureau of Standards
The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is a physical sciences laboratory, and a non-regulatory agency of the United States Department of Commerce.wikipedia
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SEAC (computer)

SEACStandards Eastern Automatic Computerearly digital SEAC computer
In 1948, financed by the United States Air Force, the Bureau began design and construction of SEAC, the Standards Eastern Automatic Computer.
SEAC (Standards Eastern Automatic Computer or Standards Electronic Automatic Computer) was a first-generation electronic computer, built in 1950 by the U.S. National Bureau of Standards (NBS) and was initially called the National Bureau of Standards Interim Computer, because it was a small-scale computer designed to be built quickly and put into operation while the NBS waited for more powerful computers to be completed (the DYSEAC).

SWAC (computer)

SWACStandards Western Automatic ComputerSWAC computer
About the same time the Standards Western Automatic Computer, was built at the Los Angeles office of the NBS by Harry Huskey and used for research there.
The SWAC (Standards Western Automatic Computer) was an early electronic digital computer built in 1950 by the U.S. National Bureau of Standards (NBS) in Los Angeles, California.

ASM-N-2 Bat

BatBat (guided bomb)Pelican
During World War II, military research and development was carried out, including development of radio propagation forecast methods, the proximity fuze and the standardized airframe used originally for Project Pigeon, and shortly afterwards the autonomously radar-guided Bat anti-ship guided bomb and the Kingfisher family of torpedo-carrying missiles.
It was developed and overseen by a unit within the National Bureau of Standards (which unit later became a part of the Army Research Laboratory) with assistance from the Navy’s Bureau of Ordnance, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Bell Telephone Laboratories.

Proximity fuze

proximity fuseproximityproximity fuses
During World War II, military research and development was carried out, including development of radio propagation forecast methods, the proximity fuze and the standardized airframe used originally for Project Pigeon, and shortly afterwards the autonomously radar-guided Bat anti-ship guided bomb and the Kingfisher family of torpedo-carrying missiles.
Also eventually pulled in were researchers from the National Bureau of Standards (this research unit of NBS later became part of the Army Research Laboratory).

Collapse of the World Trade Center

collapsecollapsedWorld Trade Center
Following September 11, 2001, NIST conducted the official investigation into the collapse of the World Trade Center buildings.
In September 2005, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) published the results of its investigation into the collapse.

Project Kingfisher

Kingfisher familyKingfisher Project
During World War II, military research and development was carried out, including development of radio propagation forecast methods, the proximity fuze and the standardized airframe used originally for Project Pigeon, and shortly afterwards the autonomously radar-guided Bat anti-ship guided bomb and the Kingfisher family of torpedo-carrying missiles.
Developed by the Bureau of Ordnance (BuOrd) and the National Bureau of Standards, under the direction of Hugh Latimer Dryden and Edward Conden.

Samuel Wesley Stratton

Samuel W. StrattonSamuel Stratton
President Theodore Roosevelt appointed Samuel W. Stratton as the first director.
He won the support for his plans from Secretary of the Treasury Lyman J. Gage and in March 1901, President William McKinley appointed him the first director of the National Bureau of Standards.

Gaithersburg, Maryland

GaithersburgGaithersburg, MDCity of Gaithersburg
NIST is headquartered in Gaithersburg, Maryland, and operates a facility in Boulder, Colorado.
The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is headquartered in Gaithersburg directly west of I-270.

WWVB

described laterWWVL
From its measurement of the natural resonance frequency of cesium—which defines the second—NIST broadcasts time signals via longwave radio station WWVB near Fort Collins, Colorado, and shortwave radio stations WWV and WWVH, located near Fort Collins and Kekaha, Hawaii, respectively.
WWVB is a time signal radio station near Fort Collins, Colorado and is operated by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

DYSEAC

A mobile version, DYSEAC, was built for the Signal Corps in 1954.
DYSEAC was a first-generation computer built by the National Bureau of Standards for the US Army Signal Corps.

WWVH

NIST Station WWVH - Kekaha, HawaiiWWVH radio
From its measurement of the natural resonance frequency of cesium—which defines the second—NIST broadcasts time signals via longwave radio station WWVB near Fort Collins, Colorado, and shortwave radio stations WWV and WWVH, located near Fort Collins and Kekaha, Hawaii, respectively.
WWVH is the callsign of the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology's shortwave radio time signal station in Kekaha, on the island of Kauai in the state of Hawaii.

NIST-F1

NIST‑F1
NIST's Boulder laboratories are best known for NIST‑F1, which houses an atomic clock.
NIST-F1 is a cesium fountain clock, a type of atomic clock, in the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Boulder, Colorado, and serves as the United States' primary time and frequency standard.

Project Pigeon

pigeon bombpigeon to steer a missile
During World War II, military research and development was carried out, including development of radio propagation forecast methods, the proximity fuze and the standardized airframe used originally for Project Pigeon, and shortly afterwards the autonomously radar-guided Bat anti-ship guided bomb and the Kingfisher family of torpedo-carrying missiles.
The testbed was the same National Bureau of Standards-developed, unpowered airframe that was later used for the US Navy's radar-guided "Bat" glide bomb, which was basically a small glider, with wings and tail surfaces, an explosive warhead section in the center, and a "guidance section" in the nose cone.

WWV (radio station)

WWVNIST Station WWV - Fort Collins, ColoradoWWV frequency measurement
From its measurement of the natural resonance frequency of cesium—which defines the second—NIST broadcasts time signals via longwave radio station WWVB near Fort Collins, Colorado, and shortwave radio stations WWV and WWVH, located near Fort Collins and Kekaha, Hawaii, respectively.
WWV is operated by U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), under the oversight of its Time and Frequency Division, which is part of NIST's Physical Measurement Laboratory based in Gaithersburg, Maryland.

Metrology

metrologicalmetrologistlegal metrology
The Bureau took custody of the copies of the kilogram and meter bars that were the standards for US measures, and set up a program to provide metrology services for United States scientific and commercial users.
In the United States legal metrology is under the authority of the Office of Weights and Measures of National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), enforced by the individual states.

Harry Huskey

Harry D. HuskeyHarry Douglas HuskeyHuskey, Harry
About the same time the Standards Western Automatic Computer, was built at the Los Angeles office of the NBS by Harry Huskey and used for research there.
Huskey designed and managed the construction of the Standards Western Automatic Computer (SWAC) at the National Bureau of Standards in Los Angeles (1949–1953).

Harry Diamond (engineer)

Harry DiamondHarry Diamond (P)
Between the wars, Harry Diamond of the Bureau developed a blind approach radio aircraft landing system.
He joined the National Bureau of Standards in 1927.

United States Department of Commerce

Department of CommerceU.S. Department of CommerceCommerce Department
The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is a physical sciences laboratory, and a non-regulatory agency of the United States Department of Commerce.
The new agency would be organized around four "pillars": a technology and innovation office including the United States Patent and Trademark Office and the National Institute of Standards and Technology; a statistical division including the United States Census Bureau and other data-collection agencies currently in the Commerce Department, and also the Bureau of Labor Statistics which would be transferred from the Department of Labor; a trade and investment policy office; and a small business development office.

Atomic clock

atomic clocksatomiccaesium clock
NIST's Boulder laboratories are best known for NIST‑F1, which houses an atomic clock.
The first atomic clock was an ammonia absorption line device at 23870.1 MHz built in 1949 at the U.S. National Bureau of Standards (NBS, now NIST).

Boulder, Colorado

BoulderBoulder, COCity of Boulder
NIST is headquartered in Gaithersburg, Maryland, and operates a facility in Boulder, Colorado.

Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award

Baldrige AwardMalcolm Baldrige National Quality Improvement Act of 1987Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Program
It is administered by the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program, which is based at and managed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), an agency of the U.S. Department of Commerce.

United States Department of the Treasury

Treasury DepartmentU.S. Treasury DepartmentU.S. Treasury
From 1830 until 1901, the role of overseeing weights and measures was carried out by the Office of Standard Weights and Measures, which was part of the United States Department of the Treasury.
After 1901, responsibility was assigned to the agency that subsequently became known as the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

Technical Guidelines Development Committee

NIST works in conjunction with the Technical Guidelines Development Committee of the Election Assistance Commission to develop the Voluntary Voting System Guidelines for voting machines and other election technology.
The Technical Guidelines Development Committee (TGDC) of the National Institute of Standards and Technology supports the Election Assistance Commission in the United States by providing recommendations on voluntary standards and guidelines related to voting equipment and technologies.

Advanced Technology Program

NIST ATPTechnology Innovation Program
The NIST Advanced Technology Program (ATP, or NIST ATP) is a United States government (U.S. Department of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology) program designed to stimulate early-stage advanced technology development that would otherwise not be funded.

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

ARRAAmerican Recovery and Reinvestment ActRecovery Act
NIST's 2009 budget was $992 million, and it also received $610 million as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.