National Labor Relations Board

NLRBChairman of the National Labor Relations BoardNational Labor BoardNational Labor Relations ActNational Labor Relations Board (NLRB)National Labour Relations Boardof the National Labor Relations Board
The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) is an independent agency of the federal government of the United States with responsibilities for enforcing U.S. labor law in relation to collective bargaining and unfair labor practices.wikipedia
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Unfair labor practice

unfair labor practiceslabor practicelabor practices
The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) is an independent agency of the federal government of the United States with responsibilities for enforcing U.S. labor law in relation to collective bargaining and unfair labor practices. Under the National Labor Relations Act of 1935 it supervises elections for labor union representation and can investigate and remedy unfair labor practices.
Such acts are investigated by the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB).

Collective bargaining

collectively bargaincollective bargaining agreementbargain collectively
The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) is an independent agency of the federal government of the United States with responsibilities for enforcing U.S. labor law in relation to collective bargaining and unfair labor practices.
An issue of jurisdiction surfaced in National Labor Relations Board v. Catholic Bishop of Chicago (1979) when the Supreme Court held that the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) could not assert jurisdiction over a church-operated school because such jurisdiction would violate the First Amendment establishment of freedom of religion and the separation of church of state.

David J. Saposs

David Saposs
He is best known for being the chief economist of the National Labor Relations Board from 1935 to 1940.

J. Warren Madden

On July 20, 1939, Republicans and conservative Democrats formed a coalition to push through the House of Representatives a resolution establishing a Special Committee to Investigate the National Labor Relations Board (the "Smith Committee"), chaired by conservative, anti-labor Rep. Howard W. Smith (D-VA).
He served as a Judge of the United States Court of Claims and was the first Chairman of the National Labor Relations Board (serving from 1935 to 1940).

Nathan Witt

Nathan R. WittWitt
The allegations were true, in at least one case: Nathan Witt, the NLRB's executive secretary and the man to whom Madden had delegated most administrative functions, was a member of the Communist Party of the United States.
Nathan Witt (February 11, 1903 – February 16, 1982), born Nathan Wittowsky, was an American lawyer who is best known as being the Secretary of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) from 1937 to 1940.

National Labor Relations Act of 1935

National Labor Relations ActWagner ActNational Labor Relations Act 1935
Under the National Labor Relations Act of 1935 it supervises elections for labor union representation and can investigate and remedy unfair labor practices.
The law established the National Labor Relations Board to prosecute violations of labor law and to oversee the process by which employees decide whether to be represented by a labor organization.

Executive order

executive ordersExecutive order (United States)Presidential Executive Order
On June 29, President Roosevelt abolished the NLB and in Executive Order 6763 established a new, three-member National Labor Relations Board.
On June 29, the president issued Executive Order 6763 "under the authority vested in me by the Constitution", thereby creating the National Labor Relations Board.

La Follette Committee

La Follette Civil Liberties CommitteeCivil Liberties CommitteeCivil Liberties Subcommittee
Better known as the "La Follette Committee", the subcommittee held extensive hearings for five years and published numerous reports.
In the United States Senate, the La Follette Civil Liberties Committee, or more formally, Committee on Education and Labor, Subcommittee Investigating Violations of Free Speech and the Rights of Labor (1936-1941), began as an inquiry into a National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) investigation of methods used by employers in certain industries to avoid collective bargaining with unions.

Independent agencies of the United States government

independent agencyindependent agency of the United States governmentindependent agencies
The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) is an independent agency of the federal government of the United States with responsibilities for enforcing U.S. labor law in relation to collective bargaining and unfair labor practices.

American Federation of Labor

AFLAmerican Federation of LabourA. F. of L.
During his time on the NLRB, Madden was often opposed by the American Federation of Labor (AFL), which believed that Madden was using the NLRA and the procedures and staff of the NLRB to favor the AFL's primary competitor, the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO).
The Wagner Act also set up to the National Labor Relations Board, which used its powers to rule in favor of unions and against the companies.

Labor spying in the United States

labor spieslabor spya company spy
The Economic Division was deeply aware of employer use of labor spies, violence, and company unions to thwart union organizing, and quietly pressed for a congressional investigation into these and other tactics.
A member of the National Labor Relations Board estimated that American industrialists spent eighty million dollars spying on their workers.

Harry A. Millis

On November 15, 1940, President Roosevelt nominated Harry A. Millis to the NLRB and named him Chairman, and nominated Madden to a seat on the U.S. Court of Claims.
Millis is best known for serving on the "first" National Labor Relations Board, an executive-branch agency which had no statutory authority.

Franklin D. Roosevelt

Franklin Delano RooseveltFranklin RooseveltRoosevelt
On August 5, 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt announced the establishment of the National Labor Board, under the auspices of the NRA, to implement the collective bargaining provisions of Section 7(a).
The act also established the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) to facilitate wage agreements and to suppress the repeated labor disturbances.

NLRB v. Jones & Laughlin Steel Corp.

National Labor Relations Board v. Jones & Laughlin Steel CorporationNLRB v. Jones & Laughlin Steel CorpNLRB v. Jones & Laughlin Steel Corporation
The Supreme Court upheld the NLRA in National Labor Relations Board v. Jones & Laughlin Steel Corporation, 301 U.S. 1 (1937).
The case arose after the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) ordered Jones & Laughlin Steel to rehire workers who had been fired for seeking to unionize.

Protected concerted activity

concerted activityprotection of concerted activity
Unfair labor practices may involve union-related situations or instances of protected concerted activity.
Consequently, in recent years, the General Counsel of the National Labor Relations Board has often taken the position that employee conversations about common workplace issues which make use of social media such as Facebook and Twitter are protected against retaliation.

Strike action

strikestrikeslabor strike
The committee uncovered extensive evidence of millions of company dollars used to pay for spies and fifth columnists within unions, exposed the culpability of local law enforcement in acts of violence and murder against union supporters (particularly in the Harlan County War), revealed the wide extent of illegal blacklisting of union members, and exposed the use of armed strikebreakers and widespread stockpiling of tear gas, vomit gas, machine guns, mortars, and armor by corporations to use against strikers.
Sympathy strikes, once the norm in the construction industry in the United States, have been made much more difficult to conduct due to decisions of the National Labor Relations Board permitting employers to establish separate or "reserved" gates for particular trades, making it an unlawful secondary boycott for a union to establish a picket line at any gate other than the one reserved for the employer it is picketing.

Paul M. Herzog

Paul Herzog
He resigned from the NLRB on June 7, 1945, and Paul M. Herzog was named his successor.
He was Chairman of the United States National Labor Relations Board from 1945 to 1953.

Robert N. Denham

In August 1947, Robert N. Denham became the NRLB's general counsel.
Robert N. Denham (1885-1954) was an American attorney who served as general counsel to the National Labor Relations Board.

Howard W. Smith

Howard SmithHoward W. "Judge" SmithHoward Worth Smith
On July 20, 1939, Republicans and conservative Democrats formed a coalition to push through the House of Representatives a resolution establishing a Special Committee to Investigate the National Labor Relations Board (the "Smith Committee"), chaired by conservative, anti-labor Rep. Howard W. Smith (D-VA).
A leader of the conservative coalition, he led the opposition to the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), established by the Wagner Act of 1935.

Robert F. Wagner

Robert WagnerRobert Ferdinand WagnerRobert Ferdinand Wagner I
Senator Robert F. Wagner (D – NY) subsequently pushed legislation through Congress to give a statutory basis to federal labor policy that survived court scrutiny.
It created the National Labor Relations Board, which mediated disputes between unions and corporations, and greatly expanded the rights of workers by banning many "unfair labor practices" and guaranteeing all workers the right to form a union.

Congress of Industrial Organizations

CIOCommittee for Industrial OrganizationCommittee for Industrial Organizations
During his time on the NLRB, Madden was often opposed by the American Federation of Labor (AFL), which believed that Madden was using the NLRA and the procedures and staff of the NLRB to favor the AFL's primary competitor, the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO).
The SWOC, now known as the United Steel Workers of America, won recognition in Little Steel in 1941 through a combination of strikes and National Labor Relations Board elections in the same year.

Right-to-work law

right-to-workRight to Workright-to-work legislation
The act also enumerated new employer rights, defined union-committed ULPs, gave states the right to opt out of federal labor law through right-to-work laws, required unions to give an 80-days' strike notice in all cases, established procedures for the President to end a strike in a national emergency, and required all union officials to sign an anti-Communist oath.
The Act tasked the National Labor Relations Board, which had existed since 1933, with overseeing the rules.

Wilma B. Liebman

Three members' terms expired in December 2007, leaving the NLRB with just two members—Chairman Wilma B. Liebman and Member Peter Schaumber.
Wilma B. Liebman (born 1950) is an American lawyer and civil servant who is best known for serving as a Member of the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB).

Wildcat strike action

wildcat strikewildcat strikesunofficial strike
Drafted by the powerful Republican Senator Robert A. Taft and the strongly anti-union Representative Fred A. Hartley, Jr., the Taft-Hartley Act banned jurisdictional strikes, wildcat strikes, political strikes, secondary boycotts, secondary picketing, mass picketing, union campaign donations made from dues money, the closed shop, and unions of supervisors.
Nevertheless, US workers can formally request that the National Labor Relations Board end their association with their labor union, if they feel that the union is not adequately representing their interests.